NAMBUCCA SHIRE COUNCIL

 

General Purpose Committee - 14 December 2011

 

AGENDA                                                                                                   Page

 

1        APOLOGIES         

2        DISCLOSURE OF INTEREST                           3    

4        General Manager Report

9.1     Draft Community Strategic Plan

5        Director Environment and Planning Report

10.1   Valla Urban Growth Area - Planning Proposal

6        Director Engineering Services Report

11.1   Nambucca Flood Investigation – Phase 2 Seaview Street, Nambucca Heads

11.2   Asset Management Plans Summary    

 

 

         


NAMBUCCA SHIRE COUNCIL

 

 

DISCLOSURE OF INTEREST AT MEETINGS

 

 

Name of Meeting:

 

Meeting Date:

 

Item/Report Number:

 

Item/Report Title:

 

 

 

I

 

declare the following interest:

          (name)

 

 

 

 

Pecuniary – must leave chamber, take no part in discussion and voting.

 

 

 

Non Pecuniary – Significant Conflict – Recommended that Councillor/Member leaves chamber, takes no part in discussion or voting.

 

 

Non-Pecuniary – Less Significant Conflict – Councillor/Member may choose to remain in Chamber and participate in discussion and voting.

 

For the reason that

 

 

 

 

 

 

Signed

 

Date

 

 

 

 

 

Council’s Email Address – council@nambucca.nsw.gov.au

 

Council’s Facsimile Number – (02) 6568 2201

 

(Instructions and definitions are provided on the next page).

 


Definitions

 

(Local Government Act and Code of Conduct)

 

 

Pecuniary – An interest that a person has in a matter because of a reasonable likelihood or expectation of appreciable financial gain or loss to the person or another person with whom the person is associated.

(Local Government Act, 1993 section 442 and 443)

 

A Councillor or other member of a Council Committee who is present at a meeting and has a pecuniary interest in any matter which is being considered must disclose the nature of that interest to the meeting as soon as practicable.

 

The Council or other member must not take part in the consideration or discussion on the matter and must not vote on any question relating to that matter. (Section 451).

 

 

Non-pecuniary – A private or personal interest the council official has that does not amount to a pecuniary interest as defined in the Act (for example; a friendship, membership of an association, society or trade union or involvement or interest in an activity and may include an interest of a financial nature).

 

If you have declared a non-pecuniary conflict of interest you have a broad range of options for managing the conflict.  The option you choose will depend on an assessment of the circumstances of the matter, the nature of your interest and the significance of the issue being dealt with.  You must deal with a non-pecuniary conflict of interest in at least one of these ways.

 

·        It may be appropriate that no action is taken where the potential for conflict is minimal.  However, council officials should consider providing an explanation of why they consider a conflict does not exist.

·        Limit involvement if practical (for example, participate in discussion but not in decision making or visa-versa).  Care needs to be taken when exercising this option.

·        Remove the source of the conflict (for example, relinquishing or divesting the personal interest that creates the conflict or reallocating the conflicting duties to another officer).

·        Have no involvement by absenting yourself from and not taking part in any debate or voting on the issue as if the provisions in section 451(2) of the Act apply (particularly if you have a significant non-pecuniary conflict of interest).

 

         


General Purpose Committee                                                                                         14 December 2011

General Manager's Report

ITEM 9.1      SF1618            141211         Draft Community Strategic Plan

 

AUTHOR/ENQUIRIES:     Michael Coulter, General Manager         

 

Summary:

 

A draft Community Strategic Plan has now been completed and is ready for exhibition.  It is proposed that it be exhibited until Friday 27 January 2012.

 

 

Recommendation:

 

1.         That the draft Community Strategic Plan be placed on public exhibition until Friday 27 January 2012

 

2.         That the exhibition comprise 2 advertisements in the Guardian News and a media release with the documents to be available at the front counter of Council’s Administration Centre, at Council’s libraries, and on Council’s website.

 

 

OPTIONS:

 

Council can decide whether or not to place the Community Strategic Plan on exhibition.  The plan has to be completed by 30 June 2012.  It would be advantageous for the plan to be completed by early February 2012 to enable it to be referred to IPART as information to support Council’s application for a special rate variation.

 

DISCUSSION:

 

The Integrated Planning and Reporting legislation requires that Council have in place a Community Strategic Plan.

 

The Community Strategic Plan is the highest level plan that a council will prepare.  The purpose of the plan is to identify the community’s main priorities and aspirations for the future and to plan strategies for achieving these goals.  While a council has a custodial role in initiating, preparing and maintaining the Community Strategic Plan on behalf of the local government area, it is not wholly responsible for its implementation.  Other partners, such as State agencies and community groups may also be engaged in delivering the long-term objectives of the plan.

 

Council must place the Draft Community Strategic Plan on public exhibition for a period of at least 28 days and comments from the community must be accepted and considered prior to the endorsement of the final Community Strategic Plan.

 

The Community Strategic Plan must be reviewed every four years.  From 2012, each newly elected council must complete the review by 30 June in the year following the local government elections and roll the planning period forward by at least 4 years to that it is always a 10 year minimum plan.

 

A draft Community Strategic Plan has now been completed and is ready for exhibition.  It is proposed that it be exhibited until Friday 27 January 2012.  This will enable the Plan to be considered by Council at its first meeting in February and be incorporated in the special rate variation application to IPART.

 

The draft Community Strategic Plan is a circularised document.

 

CONSULTATION:

 

Consultation in the preparation of the plan has followed a community engagement strategy (appendix B). 

 

There has been consultation with Councillors in relation to a first draft of the document.

 

SUSTAINABILITY ASSESSMENT:

 

Environment

 

The plan sets out Council’s strategic direction for environmental initiatives.

 

Social

 

The plan provides Council’s strategic direction for social initiatives.

 

Economic

 

The plan provides Council’s strategic direction for economic initiatives.

 

Risk

 

There are no discernible risks.

 

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS:

 

Direct and indirect impact on current and future budgets

 

The plan provides overall direction for Council’s future budgets.

 

Source of fund and any variance to working funds

 

The cost for the graphic design for the community strategic plan will need to be met from working funds.  That cost is about $10,000.

 

Attachments:

There are no attachments for this report.  


General Purpose Committee                                                                                         14 December 2011

Environment and Planning

ITEM 10.1    SF1082            141211         Valla Urban Growth Area - Planning Proposal

 

AUTHOR/ENQUIRIES:     Greg Meyers, Director Environment and Planning; Grant Nelson, Strategic Planner         

 

Summary:

 

Council at its meeting on 19 October 2011 resolved to exhibit the draft Valla Urban Growth Area Planning Proposal pursuant to Section 57 of the EPA Act. The exhibition period was from 28 October to 25 November 2011 inclusive with a public meeting held at the Nambucca Heads Entertainment Centre on Monday 7 November 2011. The list of attendees is attached.

 

During the exhibition period some 11 submissions were received which are attached and are addressed in this report. After the close of submissions on 25 November 2011 a further two submissions were received, one from the Nambucca Valley Conservation Association and the second one from the NSW Department of Primary Industries, Fisheries, Conservation and Aquaculture. Both submissions are attached and have been included and addressed in this report.

 

After considering the submissions no amendments are proposed and the Planning Proposal is presented to Council for endorsement so it may be referred to the Department of Planning and Infrastructure with a request that the Plan be made.

 

This Planning Proposal (Stage 1) will, when completed over the next 20 to 30 years or so, create a new Town for the Nambucca Valley. The total area in the whole VUGA is approximately 570ha, with the Stage 1 investigation area being 317ha.  Following the investigations, Stage 1 proposes to provide approximately 50ha of employment lands which has the potential to create some 250,000m2 of floor space for a range of industrial, warehousing, retail, and commercial uses which could provide some 750-1250 additional jobs for the Nambucca Valley.

 

To supplement these employment opportunities, some 800 residential lots will be created resulting in a population of approximately 1,900 residents.  As such a range of new open space areas and sport fields, potentially a new educational facility and other state provided services are provided for in the proposal.

 

The location of the Valla Urban Growth Area at the proposed new Nambucca Heads – Pacific Highway interchange will, in time, provide an ideal business and residential location with excellent access to the main Sydney/Brisbane highway and when the new Pacific Highway is completed is likely to be only 20-30 minutes from the Regional Centre of Coffs Harbour.

 

The new "Greenfield" residential areas will provide for well planned, walkable neighbourhoods with excellent views especially from the higher elevated sections.

 

The rezoning is the first step towards the development of the area. Following the rezoning, a site specific Development Control Plan must be prepared. Developer Contribution Plans, identification of and implementation plans for all required infrastructure - roads, water, sewer, stormwater, power, telecommunications etc will need to be prepared. The development of these will take considerable time to complete and will need to be controlled by Council.

 

NOTE: This matter requires a “Planning Decision” referred to in Section 375A of the Local Government Act 1993 requiring the General Manager to record the names of each Councillor supporting and opposing the decision

 

 

Recommendation:

 

1           That Council proceed with the Planning Proposal and refer the documents and submissions along with this Council report and resolutions to the Department of Planning and Infrastructure requesting that they seek the making of the Plan by the Minister.

 

2           That those persons/agencies who made submissions be advised of Council's decision.

 

 

OPTIONS:

 

Whilst Council could resolve not to proceed with this final stage of the proposed LEP amendment, this is not supported as the studies have identified that there are no major impediments identified nor any matter raised through the submissions that would prohibit the actual development of the Valla Urban Growth Area. 

 

 

DISCUSSION:

 

Background

 

The Valla Urban Growth Area (VUGA) (formerly Boggy Creek Release Area) has been identified within Council growth strategies since the mid 1990’s.

 

Council on the 15 November 2007 resolved to prepare a draft Local Environmental Plan (LEP) for part of the VUGA (draft Nambucca LEP 1995 Amendment No 67).

 

The Department of Planning (DoP) advised Council by letter dated 23 January 2008 that Council was required to prepare a Local Environmental Study (LES).  The DoP advised that the LES is required to address certain matters and Council should consult with relevant agencies.  Through the requirements of the DoP and the consultation process with the various government agencies, a number of studies were required to be completed as part of the rezoning process.

 

To initiate the rezoning process for Stage 1, two major landowners engaged a number of consultants to complete several studies relating to their respective properties.  To supplement these investigations Council also engaged several consultants to progress investigations in the broader area to ensure that the final boundaries of the Stage 1 area would fit in with the overall development of the whole Valla Urban Growth Area as shown in Figure 1 below.

 

Council, after considering the report and referenced Local Environmental Study at its meeting on 19 October 2011, resolved to exhibit the Valla Urban Growth Area Planning Proposal pursuant to Section 57 of the Act. The exhibition period was from 28 October to 25 November 2011 inclusive with a public meeting held at the Nambucca Heads Entertainment Centre on Monday 7 November 2011. All landowners within or adjoining or adjacent to the Valla Urban Growth Area were written to advising them of the exhibition and inviting them to attend the public meeting.

 

During the exhibition period some 11 submissions were received and are addressed in this report. After the close of submissions on 25 November 2011 a further two submissions were received, one from the Nambucca Valley Conservation Association and the second one from the NSW Department of Primary Industries, Fisheries Conservation and Aquaculture. Both submissions are attached and have been included and addressed in this report.

 

After considering the submissions no amendments are proposed. 

 

 


Figure 1

 

On 17 December 2008 the General Purpose Committee conducted a site inspection of the VUGA and the consultants acting on behalf of the two major landholders provided Councillors with a concept plan for the entire study area.

 

Whilst the two main landholders who initiated the rezoning process represent the major component of the Stage 1 area, it was considered that additional landholdings needed to be considered over the entire study area to ensure a co-ordinated and systematic rezoning occurs.  To this effect the majority of landowners in the VUGA gave permission for Council's consultants to enter upon their land to undertake specialist investigations.

 

This holistic approach to the LEP amendment has the following advantages:

 

·              It provides a superior information base on which to support decision making and preparation of a Master Plan that takes into consideration the broader landscape outside of stage 1.

·              More land may be available for various purposes such as offsets for development type and/or biodiversity purposes.

·              Should studies determine that the boundaries of stage 1 need to be refined Council does not have to provide separate resolutions to incorporate these areas into the LEP amendment rather, it is determined through the specialist investigations.

·              Reduced risk associated with unexpected issues arising during later stages of the growth area.

·              Council may be able to encourage more landholders to commit to the process.


The specialist investigations were included in the draft LES and exhibited with the Planning Proposal. The studies included are outlined in the table below:

 

Commissioned by Council

Commissioned by Landholders

Ecological Survey Report

Phase 1 Contamination Assessment

Ecological Conservation Report

Geotechnical and Acid Sulphate Soils Assessment

Ecological Vegetation and Habitat Management Report

Ecological Investigation

Acoustic Report

European and Aboriginal Heritage Investigation

European and Aboriginal Heritage Assessment

Community Needs Assessment

Bushfire Hazard Assessment

Traffic Assessment

Local Growth Management Strategy Employment Lands

Planning Proposal Preparation

Deep Creek Flood Study (presently being prepared)

Various concept Masterplanning

 

Should Council resolve to proceed with the final making of the Planning Proposal, the following steps are required before any actual on-ground development may proceed:

 

·              Finalise the land zone map and Local Environmental Plan (LEP) and refer the Planning Proposal to the Department of Planning and Infrastructure requesting that the Plan be made;

·              Once the Plan is made then the rezoned area is included in the Growth Area Maps of Council's LEP which triggers Part 6 of the LEP requiring a range of further things to be done.

 

The Nambucca LEP 2010 Part 6 requires, among other things, the following matters to be addressed:

 

6.2     Development control plan

 

(1)      The objective of this clause is to ensure that development on land in an urban release area occurs in a logical and cost-effective manner, in accordance with a staging plan and only after a development control plan that includes specific controls has been prepared for the land.

(2)      Development consent must not be granted for development on land in an urban release area unless a development control plan that provides for the matters specified in subclause (3) has been prepared for the land.

(3)      The development control plan must provide for all of the following:

          (a)      a staging plan for the timely and efficient release of urban land making provision for necessary infrastructure and sequencing,

          (b)      an overall transport movement hierarchy showing the major circulation routes and connections to achieve a simple and safe movement system for private vehicles, public transport, pedestrians and cyclists,

          (c)      an overall landscaping strategy for the protection and enhancement of riparian areas and remnant vegetation, including visually prominent locations, and detailed landscaping requirements for both the public and private domain,

          (d)      a network of passive and active recreational areas,

          (e)      stormwater and water quality management controls,

          (f)       amelioration of natural and environmental hazards, including bushfire, flooding and site contamination and, in relation to natural hazards, the safe occupation of, and the evacuation from, any land so affected,

          (g)      detailed urban design controls for significant development sites,

          (h)      measures to encourage higher density living around transport, open space and service nodes,

          (i)       measures to accommodate and control appropriate neighbourhood commercial and retail uses,

          (j)       suitably located public facilities and services, including provision for appropriate traffic management facilities and parking.

 

In addition to the above, specific Section 94 & 64 Plans need to be prepared, all zone boundaries need to be further refined, Building Height Maps, Floor Ratio Maps and a range of associated LEP amendments will be required and all readvertised together.

 

Council staff will need to take control of this process to ensure that the Stage 1 DCP provides for the broader Valla Urban Growth Area. How the process ultimately proceeds will be the subject of a Memorandum of Understanding between Council and the various landholders within the Stage 1 release area.

 

The following draft Objectives and Land Uses have been developed for the E4 Environmental Living zone as required by the DoPI letter of 23 September 2011.

 

A lot size map has also been prepared and is shown as Figure 4

 

Draft Proposed E4 Environmental Living Zone

 

Zone E4   Environmental Living

 

1        Objectives of zone

 

•        To provide for low-impact residential development in areas with special ecological, scientific or aesthetic values.

•        To ensure that residential development does not have an adverse effect on those values.

 

2        Permitted without consent

 

          Home occupations

 

3        Permitted with consent

 

          Bed and Breakfast Accommodation; Building Identification Sign; Business identification sign; Community Facility; Dwelling houses; Environmental Facility; Environmental protection works; Home-based childcare; Home Business; Home industry; Information and Education facility; Kiosk; Recreation Area; Roads

 

4        Prohibited

 

          Industries; Service Stations; Warehouse or distribution centres; Any other development not specified in item 2 or 3

 

Zone Maps

 

Figures 2, 3, and 4 below provide the total areas within each proposed zone, the proposed zones and the proposed minimum lot sizes in each zone. Figure 5 is the Urban Release Area Map.


Figure 2 – Areas within each proposed Zone

 


Figure 3 – Proposed Zones


 

Figure 4 - Proposed Lot Size Map

 

Figure 5 - Proposed Urban Release Area Map

 

 

Whilst the proposed rezoning will provide some certainty to the future development of land and assist land owners, developers and council to move forward with detailed Master Planning, it does not provide opportunity to commence development. This can only occur once Part 6 of the Nambucca Local Environmental Plan 2010 has been addressed and a further LEP amendment has been completed.

 

CONSULTATION:

 

Pursuant to Section 57 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 the Planning Proposal was publicly exhibited. Advertisements were included in the local Guardian News and those landowners within and adjoining or adjacent to the Valla Urban Growth Area along with the relevant Government Agencies were written to advising of the public exhibition. A public meeting was also held.

 

At the request of the Nambucca Heads Local Aboriginal Lands Council a face to face meeting was held with their representatives to work through and discuss the proposal. This meeting took place in the Council Chambers on Wednesday 23 November 2011, when the NHLALC Board met with the Acting Director Environment and Planning Mr Phillip Gall and Strategic Planner Mr Grant Nelson. The matters raised and the planning responses are outlined in the submissions table.

 

The following table provides an outline of the submissions received, the issues raised and the planning response to the issues. Copies of all submissions are attached.

 

 

Valla Urban Growth Area - Submissions

Name

Issues Raised

Planning Response

Samatha Cox

Queried the extent of the growth area as their land appears to be surrounded by future growth area.

The land in question in this submission is located west of the proposed Stage 1 Area. Further consideration of this land can be made when Council examines the future release of Stage 2.

Dr John Bennett

Questioned how a growth area such as the one proposed has been included in State Government Policy.

The Valla Urban Growth Area has been identified in Council Land Release Strategies since 1990, and included in subsequent land release strategies and structure plans prepared in 1995, 2005 and 2010. Most recently the Valla Urban Growth Area was identified for Short-Medium term release in the Local Growth Management Strategy - Employment Lands. The strategy examined the potential of other suitably unconstrained areas in the shire with limited success. Being a relatively unconstrained area identified for growth for some time that has direct access to the Pacific Highway upgrade, it is a logical area to be included as a growth area in the Mid North Coast Regional Strategy.

 

The growth is located on prime agricultural land.

Although the majority of the Valla Urban Growth Area is presently zoned RU2 Rural Landscape, it was previously zoned 1(d) Future Urban in the Nambucca LEP 1995. Despite this, the growth area was clearly identified in the Mid North Coast Strategy as an area identified for future growth. In finalising the Regionally Significant Farmland Mapping Project Final Recommendations Report (DoP, 2008) states the following:
Regionally significant farmland cannot be considered for urban (residential, tourism, commercial and
industrial) or rural residential zoning unless the land is:
a) identified in a council rural residential strategy which has been agreed to by the Department of
Planning as at the completion date of the Mid North Coast Regional Strategy, (or exhibited by
that time and subsequently agreed to); or
b) part of an Growth Area under the 2008 Mid North Coast Regional Strategy; or
c) already zoned, subdivided or approved for an urban or rural residential use under an LEP. 

The purpose of this project was to ensure within the regional area an adequate amount of farmland is retained for future agricultural use. It achieves this by recommending no inappropriate rezonings occur on mapped agricultural land. On this basis it is considered that the Regionally Significant Mapping project adequately protects farmland from rezoning in the region even though it specifically excludes growth areas such as the Valla Urban Growth Area from these recommendations. 

 

The flora and fauna reports indicate the area provides habitat for a number of threatened species - once this habitat is gone it is lost forever. It needs to be carefully conserved.

Agreed, the flora and fauna report indicates that there is potential habitat for threatened species available within the subject area. These areas are proposed to be protected from future development through the provision of 71Ha of E3 Environmental Management Zone land. The proposed Environmental Management Zones include areas that are presently vegetated but also riparian areas proposed to be rehabilitated/restored. Although impacts associated with anthropogenic change are inevitable the growth area has been designed to minimise these impacts and potentially improve some existing sensitive but degraded areas.

 

Despite threatened species being detected the reporting does not require a referral to the Commonwealth Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities. There is no sense here of the precautionary principle rather the opposite - a disturbing number and level of caveats.

The Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 governs federal involvement in biodiversity impacts. The species detected that are listed under this legislation were the Grey-headed flying fox, Cattle Egret and Black Faced Monarch. The flora and fauna report prepared as part of this proposal addressed the requirements of the EPBC Act and found that the 'action' being an LEP Amendment is not likely to impact on matters of National Environmental Significance including assessments of these individual species. This is generally because the site is not known to provide significant breeding or foraging grounds for these species and the proposal aims at maintaining and improving the potential habitat areas. 

 

The Conservation Management Strategy (Aug 2011) suggests: long term monitoring (so if there are unfortunate consequences, will the development be removed, like a movie run backwards, as if nothing happened? and making contingency plans for ‘compensatory measures.” I would just repeat that once habit is lost it is gone, it cannot be replanted or repaired.

As stated previously the majority of habitat is to be retained or rehabilitated. The long term monitoring of the habitat areas would be beneficial in a number of ways. It would ensure rehabilitated areas are establishing adequately; it would ensure edge effects on existing habitats and proposed areas are being adequately managed, for instance weed management and erosion and sediment control; it would gauge future management actions that may be required.

 

There is no proven need for this development but there is a proven need to save our biodiversity and preserve the lifestyle, vistas and character of this beautiful region.

The Mid North Coast Regional Strategy and Council’s Local Growth Management Strategy - Employment Lands identify the need for this type of development to occur at regional and local scale. The Mid North Coast Regional Strategy states employment lands in the regional centres will be complemented by strategically located employment lands in Nambucca (being the Valla Growth Area) and Kempsey.  The Local Growth Management Strategy - Employment Lands identifies the Stage 1 Valla Urban Growth Area employment lands for short-medium term release. In terms of residential land the Mid North Coast Regional Strategy indicates that the combined growth areas of the mid north coast caters for 59,600 new homes by 2031 for a forecast population increase of 94,000. The strategy expects that this supply of new residential land will respond to population increases in the region and assist with housing affordability.

Peter & Julie Mackay

Expansion is needed, but not an industrial area.

The Mid North Coast Regional Strategy and the Local Growth Management Strategy highlight the immediate need to provide additional employment lands in the Region and the Shire.

 

Current industrial areas in Nambucca Heads and Macksville are only 50% utilized.

Vacant Industrial Land in the Nambucca LGA is limited to approximately 20Ha or less in Macksville (Yarrawonga St) and 3 Ha in Nambucca Heads (Railway Rd) (LGMS 2009-2010 figures). The Local Growth Management Strategy - Employment Lands identifies between 38 and 93Ha of land is required in the short to medium term.

 

Pristine environment attracts tourists and retirees to the area.

The LGA and the region contain the attractions and environment that make the area a popular tourist destination. The area proposed to be used for the Valla Urban Growth Area has no current known tourism attractions or areas open to public access. The provision of the growth area has the potential to increase services and public areas available for visitors to the area.

 

Retail would be a better use of the first 250m of the immediate area facing the new highway.

Retail development is generally not permitted fronting Pacific Highway (S117 Directions). The industrial area is best placed close to the interchange to allow easier access to the major transport as well as minimising traffic conflicts with residential areas.

 

Industrial area should be kept out of sight not put right on the highway.

The preparation of the DCP will include a visual impact assessment and landscaping strategies to minimise visual intrusiveness of the area.

 

Council should resist the RTA building a truck marshalling depot in this area - will detract from entire Valley.

The proposed highway route is approved along with roadside facilities such as the truck interchange identified in the proposed route. A trailer exchange such as the one proposed has a number of benefits for the region including improving safety on roads by reducing travel distance and also will decrease heavy vehicle trailer exchanges from occurring in inappropriate locations such as residential streets or commercial precincts.

 

Delete all industrial zoning and replace with retail, limited to the first 250m facing the new highway. There is a need for this and it is more in keeping with the area.

The Local Growth Management Strategy - Employment Lands indicates Council requires additional industrial land to be provided and the area proposed is expected to be suitable for industries such as warehousing and distribution, light manufacturing and light industrial uses.

 

Increase residential lot sizes to keep more natural look of the Valley and to avoid creating a slum.

The actual lot sizes will be examined more closely with the urban design assessment undertaken as part of the DCP process. Those provided in the draft reflect the existing lot size provisions in the LGA. Although the minimum lot size is identified as 450m2, the market average lot size is expected to range between 600 and 800sqm.

 

50m wide tree corridors running north to south should be set aside to lessen the impact of development and ensure wildlife corridors.

The wildlife linkages identified in the draft zoning plan, traverse existing sensitive landscape features and habitat such as the riparian areas. At local scale the major wildlife corridor in the area occurs as a link between Mount England remnant and the Nambucca State Forest. The wildlife linkages proposed in this Planning Proposal will contribute significantly to existing habitat retention and improvement for certain species. Other more sensitive species would be more likely to utilise the larger adjoining corridor. A large part of the urban design will involve landscaping for visual separation, open space and amenity provision. Some of these features are likely to traverse the landscape in a north south direction.

 

Stage 2 - include the three properties that have been left off the map to achieve 100% change.

The land in question in this submission is located west of the proposed Stage 1 Area. Further consideration of this land can be made when Council examines the future release of Stage 2. The land was not previously identified as being within part of the Future Urban Zone (LEP 1995). Some of the land also appears to provide potential habitat, the equivalent of which was zoned E3 Environmental Management within the stage 1 area.


 

EPA

Consideration of some relevant planning matters appear to be deferred until the adoption of a DCP, eg Acid Sulphate Soils and flooding in the east of the area, soil contamination, flooding, water quality and Aboriginal cultural heritage, particularly with respect to non-Welsh and Ussher lands.

The studies completed to date have made a number of recommendations which are proposed to be addressed at the DCP stage. None of the studies completed have indicated that the proposal should not proceed, rather they provide recommendations to ensure it proceeds in an appropriate manner and with the appropriate level of investigations. Part 6 of the Nambucca LEP 2010 is designed to ensure that the attributes of the site are adequately addressed prior to development occurring on the Land.

 

Extent of environmental protection zones - future rezoning in Stage 2 will need to be consistent with recommendations of BCR. 27ha of habitat areas in deferred RU2 zones should be protected. Buffer in industrial zone should be rezoned as E3. Concerned about potentially inappropriate land uses adopted by default in the LEP (eg extensive agriculture)

The proposed zones are generally consistent with the Biodiversity Conservation Report. Areas that are not consistent will be subject to future rezoning consideration when the impacts of the highway interchange can be quantified. At present the proposed rural zone will ensure no intensification of land use permissibilities will impact on the land.

 

Identification of threatened species and endangered ecological communities.  Some species recorded in NWPS Atlas are not mentioned in report. Consideration needs to be given to their protection, if presence confirmed.

As stated previously the LEP amendment has generally used a maintain or improve policy over the landscape. Specific habitat types and the threatened species that may use them will be given further consideration, when preparing restoration and management plans for the area.

 

Contaminated Sites - Contamination Report should have been included in exhibition documents. Precise locations of the two identified contaminated sites needs to be confirmed and appropriate zoning established. More studies need to be done on RU2 zoned lands to the south of the Ussher lands.

The Phase 1 Environmental Site Assessment or preliminary contamination report was made available in the exhibition documents under appendix 8 of the Planning Proposal. As stated in the submission more detailed investigations into the potential contamination will be undertaken on the site during the preparation of the DCP. The RU2 zone in the south of the growth area will be given more consideration when a proposal is put forward to modify the zone. At present it is not proposed to amend the zoning in this area. 

 

Biodiversity Offsets - EPA would appreciate an opportunity to discuss offsetting and management options further if requested and preferably prior to rezoning rather than at commencement of development.

Further discussion on offsets will be made with the EPA and other government authorities such as the RMS during the preparation of the DCP for the area.

 

Acoustics investigation - Infrastructure SEPP guidelines are not referred to. Whilst similar to Aust Standards, these guidelines are generally less than the maximum. Combined predicted noise contours should be overlaid on the zone map. Consequences of noise on fauna using adjacent E3 zones has not been considered

The noise guidelines in the infrastructure SEPP apply to development adjacent to roads with daily traffic volumes exceeding 40,000 vehicles. The Pacific Highway at this location encounters approx 1,500 vehicles/day and therefore these provisions of the SEPP do not specifically apply although they could be used as guidelines. The Acoustic Assessment has considered the most relevant information available to suit this type of rezoning.  As the design/master planning of the area progresses additional modelling will be undertaken if necessary to ensure landuses, building densities and heights etc are appropriately considered in respect to noise impacts. The existing size and shape of landscape linkages and habitat areas within the proposed growth area would be subject to high edge to core ratios and subsequently greatly impacted by edge effects. Species using the edge areas of remnant habitat would largely be generalist species highly adapted to anthropogenic change. It is agreed that it is not ideal to increase these impacts therefore management of the ecotone will be given a priority in developing management strategies for these areas.

 

Provision of infrastructure - concerned about number of indicative roads shown across E3 zoned lands. Roads should run east west parallel to E3 zones. Cow Creek Road upgrading should be kept to a minimum to preserve integrity of nearby vegetation. More consideration needs to be given to integration of roads with deferred RU2 lands. Mains should be collocated with roads where possible. All new infrastructure should be subterranean where possible.

In developing the traffic hierarchy plan for the growth area an objective will be to minimise the number of crossings required over waterways. However it is also acknowledged that urban areas will generally require alternative exit routes to satisfy bushfire legislation. Other matters raised in this point will be given consideration during the preparation of the DCP.

 

Flooding and water quality information re flooding and water quality presented in Planning Proposal insufficient to provide adequate assessment. Studies should be extended to include RU2 lands to the south and the east. Comprehensive flood risk assessment incorporating climate change and sea level rise needs to be undertaken.

As stated in the Council report accompanying the exhibition material a flood study for Deep Creek is presently being undertaken in accordance with current state government policies on flood plain management and sea level rise. It has not aligned with the preparation of the Planning Proposal due to the availability of LiDAR. Now that Council has LiDAR available the study is progressing. Although it is unlikely that the study will be complete prior to the rezoning being considered, an additional LEP amendment will be undertaken at a later date to refine land use zones over the growth area and this amendment will give further consideration to any flood prone land.

 

Aboriginal Cultural Heritage - further studies should be conducted and a 20m buffer placed around former Cow Creek Aboriginal Reserve.  CCAR is a very significant area/place to local Aboriginal community.  Detailed consultation should occur with local Aboriginal community regarding its protection.

Further studies are to be undertaken at locations with potential archeological/heritage significance within the growth area. These studies will including test excavations at specific locations in the presence of NHLALC members. It is proposed to maintain the former aboriginal reserve as RU2 Rural Landscape (no change) and include a 20m buffer (development exclusion zone) to the land within the DCP. 

Geoff Smyth Consulting

A portion of land along Cow Creek Road should be included in the Planning Proposal - it would complete the development potential along Cow Creek Road. Also, land owned by the Marriotts to the north of Cow Creek Road could be included in the conservation area (this piece of land contains an Aboriginal site). This need not be addressed in Stage 1 but should be considered in future stages.

This submission is acknowledged and the potential addition of conservation lands and low density environmental living lots will be given consideration in future rezoning stages. It is noted that the need to include additional land may be limited.

RFS

Future subdivision of residential land is not to be undertaken in one complete subdivision/process. Council should ensure each subdivision meets the required RFS performance standards.

Section 6.2 of the Nambucca LEP 2010 requires Council to prepare a staging plan for the timely and efficient release of urban land making provision for necessary infrastructure and sequencing. Future subdivision of the land, if Bushfire Prone, will require a bushfire safety authority of the NSW Rural Fire Service.


 

 

Planning Proposal does not address how soil and erosion control issues on land with a slope greater than 15 degrees will be resolved.

Council’s DCP 2010 contains provisions relating to sediment and erosion control and these matters are typically addressed in the detailed design phase of subdivisions. Nevertheless it is intended to prepare an Integrated Water Cycle Management Plan to address stormwater and nutrient issues specifically related to the growth area.

 

"Home Day Care" is an exempt or complying development in some of the land use zones. If this activity is undertaken in a Bush Fire Prone Area they will require a Bush Fire Safety Authority under S100B of the Rural Fires Act 1997.

This is noted, however, this is matter of relevance across the state and should be addressed at the Standard Instrument LEP level or within the Rural Fires Act.

 

Grasslands are now a hazardous vegetation category - future developments will need to take this into consideration.

The Bushfire Hazard Assessment completed as part of the Planning Proposal process gives consideration to the grasslands as a hazard and the Planning for Bushfire Protection Guidelines.

 

Roads and utility services should provide an appropriate level of service for protection and evacuation of occupants in the event of an emergency.

Provision of services will be in accordance with relevant policies and guidelines. The Bushfire assessment undertaken as part of this planning proposal gives consideration to the protection and evacuation of occupants. These matters will be given further consideration during preparation of the DCP.

Nambucca Local Aboriginal Land Council

Council staff met with representatives from the NHLALC board on the 23-Nov 2011. The purpose of the meeting was to provide the Lands Council with an overview of the proposal and the findings within the growth area in order to allow the Lands Council to make a verbal or written submission.

 

 

The key matters raised at this meeting were that representatives of the NHLALC should be present on site whenever works are undertaken that may require the soil to be turned.

Council will ensure appropriate consultation and presence of the aboriginal community during any works or investigations that require disturbance to the soil.

 

No other specific matters of concern were raised.

 

 

A record of the meeting is available to Councillors on request.

 


 

Ms Bevan

Industry in the area is struggling to continue, building a new site will not help this

Vacant Industrial Land in the Nambucca LGA is limited to approximately 20Ha or less in Macksville (Yarrawonga St) and 3 Ha in Nambucca Heads (Railway Rd) (LGMS 2009-2010 figures). The Local Growth Management Strategy Employment Lands identifies between 38 and 93Ha of land is required in the short to medium term. The proposal will allow an alternative range of lot sizes that may suit other industry types.

 

Council will continue to assist local economic development through its business development unit.

 

Housing sites are not being purchased & built on – how long has Valla Pearl been on the market with minimum sales?

It is the intent of the growth area to provide an area of residential living in the vicinity of the proposed employment land, providing a work and live environment. The staging plan to be completed as part of the DCP will specifically address the release of residential and employment lands.

The Valla Pearl development is a Rural residential subdivision. This form of development should not be compared to residential development. A comparison to the residential developments in South Macksville or Valla Beach should be used as a gauge which demonstrate demand.

 

The infrastructure to support any increased population is not there & to hope it will just follow is unwise

 

Services would be required to be provided as part of the development of the land. Part 6 of the Nambucca LEP 2010 also requires the DCP for the area to consider the efficient staging of infrastructure and provision of services. Public Service providers such the Health providers, NSW Police or NSW Fire Brigades  are responsible for determining the resources required in a particular area. Public service providers have been advised of the proposed growth area.

Mac Wilson

The land has significant agricultural value.

It is considered that the Regionally Significant Farmland Mapping project adequately protects farmland from rezoning in the region even though it specifically excludes growth areas such as the Valla Urban Growth Area from these recommendations

 

There are no existing services, power, water, sewerage, or communications.

Services would be required to be provided as part of the development of the land. Part 6 of the Nambucca LEP 2010 also requires the DCP for the area to consider the efficient staging of infrastructure and provision of services.

 

Residents would need to use cars to access town services such as Nambucca Heads.

It is intended to have a small centre located within the growth area to assist in servicing the local residents. It would not be possible for all services to be addressed at a local level however this is typical of regional areas.

 

The development does not fit the character of the area.

The proposal is for a new urban area - it is not intended to maintain the existing rural character of the area. Rather the future master planning and development will need to ensure that the character of the adjoining land is respected particularly in the fringing urban areas.

 

No present demand for commercial/ industrial development.

Vacant Industrial Land in the Nambucca LGA is limited to approximately 20Ha or less in Macksville (Yarrawonga St) and 3 Ha in Nambucca Heads (Railway Rd) (LGMS 2009-2010 figures). The Local Growth Management Strategy Employment Lands identifies between 38 and 93Ha of land is required in the short to medium term.

 

Truck interchange would not be appropriate.

The proposed highway route is approved along with roadside facilities such as the truck interchange identified in the proposed route. A trailer exchange such as the one proposed has a number of benefits for region including improving safety on roads by reducing travel distance and also will decrease heavy vehicle trailer exchanges from occurring in inappropriate locations such as residential streets or commercial precincts.

 

Demand for residential area would only be as a dormitory suburb of the surrounding businesses, employment would be required elsewhere until business establishes.

It is the intent of the growth area to provide an area of residential living in the vicinity of the proposed employment land, providing a work and live environment. The staging plan to be completed as part of the DCP will specifically address the release of residential and employment lands.

 

450sqm minimum lot size may encourage low budget dwellings or overcapitilised development.

The actual lot sizes will be examined more closely with the urban design assessment undertaken as part of the DCP process. Those provided in the draft reflect the existing lot size provisions in the LGA. Although the minimum lot size is identified as 450m2, the market average lot size is expected to range between 600 and 800sqm.

 

Review this proposal and consider alternative locations adjacent to existing industrial and residential areas allowing the efficient expansion and connection to services.

This is a logical statement and if constraint free land was available which adjoins existing urban zoned lands then it would be unlikely that Council would have examined the Boggy/Cow Creek area as a potential growth area in 1995. The consultants who prepared the Local Growth Management Strategy - Employment Lands were requested to locate any potential reserve growth areas with suitable development potential and re examine the Boggy Cow Creek area in detail. Only one area in south Macksville was found to have any potential suitability (although slightly flood prone) and this land was located some distance from Macksville. The Valla Urban Growth Area was still identified as a suitable location for future growth.


 

Pete Rundle

Creating a new town is nonsensical - a more suitable option would be to augment an existing settlement working in collaboration with another LGA such as Bellingen. A suitable alternative location may be Raleigh for instance. 

This is a logical statement and if constraint free land was available which adjoins existing urban zoned lands then it would be unlikely that Council would have examined the Boggy/Cow Creek area as a potential growth area in 1995. The consultants who prepared the Local Growth Management Strategy - Employment Lands were requested to locate any potential reserve growth areas with suitable development potential and re examine the Boggy Cow Creek area in detail. Only one area in south Macksville was found to have any potential suitability (although slightly flood prone) and this land was located some distance from Macksville. The Valla Urban Growth Area was still identified as a suitable location for future growth.

 

Documents supporting the planning proposal indicated there is a shortage of industrial land, however land at Railway Crescent is presently available and has been undeveloped for some time.

Vacant Industrial Land in the Nambucca LGA is limited to approximately 20Ha or less in Macksville (Yarrawonga St) and 3 HA in Nambucca Heads (Railway Rd) (LGMS 2009-2010 figures). The Local Growth Management Strategy Employment Lands identifies between 38 and 93Ha of land is required in the short to medium term.

 

Single trees are not considered in the ecological assessments despite their paramount importance

Single trees scattered through the growth area will be considered in more detail at the DCP stage. Where individual trees have ecological, heritage or amenity significance their retention will be considered in the planning process.

 

The employment lands strategy suggests Nambucca LGA is overrepresented with population service industries such as personal services, cafes and restaurants, yet the Growth area proposes more of the same type of development. NSC needs more young businesses employing younger white collar workers.

Although the growth area will provide for some personal services to service the local population, located in the B2 Zone,  the other employment lands will  target industrial and other businesses intended to provide a range of employment opportunities. It is noted that although particular uses are identified as more suitable to the area, given location to the highway and central to Sydney and Brisbane, it is difficult to control the types of uses that the market will demand on these sites.

 

Internet has not been addressed in the services report.

There are provisions within the state government policy to assist in facilitating the rollout of the National Broadband Network. Internet would be available to all land within the growth area. An appropriate communications provider would be engaged during the design development phase to ensure this occurs in an appropriate manner.

 

Where is the school site located at Valla Beach? What is the future of Anderson Park?

The Department of Education owns land in Valla Beach - whether or not this land will be developed for that purpose is not known. There have been no plans or resolutions of Council that would change the way that Anderson Park is presently used.

 

Police Services in Nambucca are presently inadequate.

Public Service providers such the NSW Police or NSW Fire Brigades  are responsible for determining the resources required in a particular area. Public service providers have been advised of the proposed growth area.

 

The location of the proposal in relation to local hospitals is inadequate

A number of regional towns and villages are located some distance from a local hospitals.  This is not out of the ordinary. The location of the growth area would be approximately 30 mins to Coffs Harbour Base Hospital and 20 mins to Macksville District Hospital. When the Pacific Highway upgrade is completed these times are expected to be reduced.

 

How Fires Services would be affected by the Growth Area is not addressed.

Public Service providers such the NSW Police or NSW Fire Brigades  are responsible for determining the resources required in a particular area. Public service providers have been advised of the proposed growth area.

 

The proposal will have a disastrous impact on other businesses including the commercial land in Valla Beach.

The commercial land proposed at the Valla Urban Growth Area is expected to accommodate services and the needs of the local population. Similarly, the commercial zoned land at Valla Beach is intended to be available to service the local population at Valla Beach. In the short term there may be some overlap in services provided, however over time as the development in the growth area proceeds overlap in services will be reduced.

 

Cycle ways should be encouraged to connect with urban areas including the Valla Urban Growth Area.

Council has a Cycle way strategy and plan, this will need to be reviewed over time to ensure all localities are given consideration. It is expected the Valla Urban Growth Area will be designed as a live and work area where walk or ride to work infrastructure is provided. 

Monica Rundle

Please Clarify the term - Heavy Industry?

Although original plans and strategies recommended heavy industry may be a suitable use in this area, more recent investigations undertaken as part of the Local Growth Management Strategy Employment Lands indicate heavy industry should be prohibited to avoid land use conflicts. Heavy industry is defined as a building or place used to carry out an industrial activity that requires separation from other development because of the nature of the processes involved, or the materials used, stored or produced, and includes:
(a)  hazardous industry, or
(b)  offensive industry.
It may also involve the use of a hazardous storage establishment or offensive storage establishment.

 

Restricting the area to industrial/warehousing -manual business Council is failing to introduce entrepreneurial businesses for the younger workforce for example IT/clerical.

The employment lands will  target industrial and other businesses intended to provide a range of employment opportunities. Although particular uses are identified as more suitable to the area given location to the highway and central to Sydney and Brisbane, it is noted that it is difficult to control the types of uses that the market will demand on these sites.

 

Will Council ensure proposed industrial and retail areas take advantage of considerable roof footprints for the collection and re-use of water on site.

Part 6 of the Nambucca LEP 2010 requires that the DCP addresses stormwater and Water quality matters. During the preparation of the DCP a Water Cycle Management Strategy or similar plan will be developed to ensure both employment lands and urban lands adequately consider water sensitive urban design principles.

 

Will Council ensure proposed industrial and retail areas take advantage of considerable roof footprints for solar power.

There is no legislative requirement to require alternative energy sources, however it is acknowledged and will be given consideration during the preparation of the DCP.

 

There has been inadequate provision of services such as schools, hospitals and public transport.

Public Service providers such the NSW Police or NSW Fire Brigades  are responsible for determining the resources required in a particular area. Public service providers have been advised of the proposed growth area.

NSW Department of Trade, Investment, Regional Infrastructure and Services - Resources and Energy Division

The geotechnical investigation appears to be preliminary only, and provides insufficient basis for adequately assessing the proposal, even at a conceptual level.

The report prepared by Coffey was a preliminary geotechnical and acid sulphate soil investigation for Welsh and Ussher properties. The purpose of the preliminary assessment was to identify geotechnical constraints to the site for future urban land use. The objectives of the preliminary geotechnical assessment were to broadly identify specific site features and site constraints which may affect the design and planning for future urban development. This included:

-         Identify areas of steep slopes and potential instability,

-         Provide a preliminary assessment of likely foundation conditions, and

-         Provide an assessment of areas of erosion potential and areas affected by poor drainage.

The scope of works for this preliminary geotechnical investigation did not extend to intrusive investigations, such as drilling works to map site geology or collection of soil samples for geochemical laboratory analysis. The report provides a summary of site stratigraphy based on interpretation of currently available geological data (including mapping). It is noted that current mapping and site observations reported by Coffey identified outcropping Valla Adamelite (granite) on upper slopes and ridgelines in northern margins of the study area and which occurs on the eastern foot slopes of Mount England.

Coffey’s report has recommended that based on the information collated in the investigation and the site walkover assessment it is considered that the site will be suitable for urban development subject to further work which is detailed below. Further work required for the site should include but not be limited to the following:

-     A test pit and borehole investigation over the site to broadly assess the subsurface conditions. Test pit investigations would likely be used in the hill slope areas and borehole investigations used in the low lying floodplain area with a shallow water table.

-     Further investigation work to locate the presence and extent of old mine workings (assuming that the workings exist). This may require the use of geophysics at the site to identify any changes in subsurface conditions followed by intrusive investigations to identify and possibly remediate the site.

-     That further, more detailed, ASS investigation is undertaken in the low lying areas in the east of the site to gain a better understanding of the potential risk of ASS within the site.

-     Further investigation for pavement design and site classification will be required at appropriate stages of development.

The works which have been undertaken and the findings from the preliminary geotechnical investigation are considered appropriate for assessment of the current rezoning proposal. The request to undertake more detailed geological mapping and geochemical investigations are matters that can be investigated further during later stages of this projects development.

 

The western side of the subject proposal impinges on, or is close to known or potential hard rock and mineral resources developed in or around Triassic age granitic rocks forming Mount England. Nambucca Shire Council has previously been notified of the need to protect those resources pursuant to Ministerial Direction 1.3 (2007) (and earlier directions) issued under s117 of the Environmental Assessment and Planning Act 1979.

 

 

Granite hard rock resources occur within the northern margins of the study area. These areas also contain steep slopes and generally correspond with the heavily vegetated foot slopes on Mount England. There are no current quarrying activities located within the eastern slopes of Mount England. The physical and environmental constraints which would limit future urban development on these northern margins would similarly also provide a significant constraint to any future mining or quarrying proposal for this area.

Alternative sources of extractive materials already exist in the Valla area. Marriott’s Quarry is located on the north-west side of Mount England and holds a current development approval permitting extraction from this granite rock resource. Coffey understands that this quarry’s approval allows access to sufficient rock resource to satisfy local construction demand for at least the next 30 years.

Coffey understands that the proposed Local Environment Plan (LEP) amendment for the Valla Urban Growth Area rezoning proposal does not include prohibitions on the future development of mining or extractive industries within the study area. Therefore, the proposal is not inconsistent with Ministerial Planning Directions or the State Environmental Planning Policy (Mining, Petroleum Production and Extractive Industries) 2007.

 

Any assessment of the subject proposal needs to consider the hard rock resource potential of the Mount England area in its regional context. It is important to appreciate, that for geological reasons, the Mount England-Pickett Hill area is strategically significant as both a current and potential future source of complying coarse aggregate or premium road base.

 

Coffey has recently undertaken detailed geotechnical investigations and review of regional quarry resources on behalf of NSW Roads and Maritime Services (RMS) for the proposed Warrell Creek to Urunga (W2U) Pacific Highway Upgrade.

A review of available geological mapping shows that significant granite (Valla Adamelite) resources also occur to the north of Deep Creek in the Pickett Hill area. The alignment of the W2U Upgrade of the Pacific Highway traverses areas where large deposits of granite are known to be present within the road construction corridor.

Coffey is not aware that the RMS is considering sourcing hard rock resources from the Mount England area for use in the highway upgrade. Such an alternative quarry proposal may involve significant project delays while the necessary environmental impact studies and planning approvals were sought to develop a large hard rock quarry.

As discussed above the existing quarry operations which are located to the northwest of Mount England are understood to have sufficient capacity and hold long term development approvals to supply local construction demand for quarry resources.

 

The subject proposal does not appear to have given appropriate consideration to the construction material needs of the subject proposal, despite this information being requested by Mineral Resources Branch. This deficiency prevents any realistic assessment of the potential cumulative impact of the subject proposal on the sustainability and affordability of future construction material supply in the district.

 

The proposal is for an LEP amendment to allow rezoning for the Valla Urban Growth Area. It is not part of the current project studies to request detailed planning for construction material supply at this stage in the project. Local quarries located nearby to the study area have sufficient resources available and hold current development approvals which are considered to be sufficient to meet future construction material needs for urban development in the Valla area.

Further assessment of the need for construction materials and potential demand are matters to be examined during later stages of the project development.

 


 

LATE SUBMISSIONS

NSW Department of Primary Industries, Fisheries Conservation and Aquaculture

The Department supports the management issues identified in Conservation Areas Management Strategies.

No comment required

 

The conservation areas as proposed are supported.

No comment required

 

The Department recommends the Environmental Buffers discussed in the management report be included in the either the E3 or E2 zone in preference to the management through DCP controls.

 This recommendation will be further considered during the preparation of the DCP.

 

Development Activities should aim to improve or have no net impact upon the receiving watercourse.

As part of the DCP preparation an Integrated Water Cycle Management Strategy or similar report will be prepared to address water management within the growth area.

 

It is recommended that a Land Use Conflict Risk Assessment be undertaken with particular consideration to the North East and South West boundaries.

When preparing the DCP, consideration will be given to land use practices within the growth area and adjoining land. Appropriate land use mitigation/management measures will be used to avoid land use conflicts. Council's existing DCP provisions require buffers, however where necessary other land use mitigation measures such as refining the zone boundaries may be used to avoid land use conflicts. 

 

It is acknowledged that the land is identified in the Mid North Coast Regional Strategy for future growth, however no additional development should be proposed west of the highway, as it will impact on primary production.

Although Council is not aware of any other proposed LEP amendments for future growth on viable rural land, any future development of this type would be required to address the sustainability criteria of the Mid North Coast Regional Strategy if the area is not located in an agreed growth area.  The Mid North Coast Regional Strategy also contains provisions that prevent the rezoning of areas mapped as regionally significant farmland (other than agreed growth areas).

 

An agricultural Evaluation Study would be useful given some of the land is identified in the Regionally significant farmland mapping project.

The Mid North Coast Regional Strategy contains provisions that prevent the rezoning of areas mapped as regionally significant farmland (other than agreed growth areas). Therefore although part of the land is mapped as regionally significant farmland it would not prevent the planning proposal from proceeding. Further consideration will be given to land uses in the adjoining properties and how these lands may be impacted by the potential development of the growth area. As stated previously appropriate management of fringe areas will be required to minimise landuse conflicts.

Nambucca Valley Conservation Association

There will be issues with spray drift from nearby Macadamia farms.

Councils DCP 2010 has requirements for buffers to various land uses. These will be used to assist in the DCP preparation and staging of release areas. Some areas where adjoining lands are occupied by more intensive uses such as horticulture may require buffers to be implemented and development restricted until that adjoining land is released. 

 

Closer examination of contamination on land proposed E4 Environmental Living is required.

Agreed, the preliminary site investigation has identified that further investigations are required prior to finalising the master planning for the area (e.g at the DCP stage) to ensure areas proposed for development are considered appropriate for the proposed use.

 

Closer examination of the arsenic mine is required.

Agreed, the preliminary site investigation has identified that further investigations are required prior to finalising the master planning for the area (eg at the DCP stage) to ensure areas proposed for development are considered appropriate for the proposed use.

 

Environmental Living blocks are located on unstable and steep lands - not suitable for sustainable environmental living. These sites will require a great level of disturbance for development to proceed.

Investigations undertaken as part of the DCP will determine the type of development that should occur in the E4 Environmental Living. Further consideration of this area in detail may determine that an alternative lot size is required to reduce the density of the area to address amenity, services, bushfire, slopes and other potential constraints.

 

The structure plan population projections are not correct. The developers demographer suggests varying predictions in relation to sea change and which areas will develop. 

The structure plan population projections were based on a 2% average annual growth rate. It is acknowledged that population projections are not an exact science. It is for this reason that Council’s Local Growth Management Strategy looks at 3 variations of project growth: a low, medium and high scenario. Council will continue to monitor population growth which fluctuates overtime. Where necessary Council’s planning strategies will be reviewed and adjusted to accommodate significant changes to population demographics.

 

A lack of quality health services in regional areas is causing a movement of people back to the cities.

Current information suggests that although the LGA experienced population increases, persons aged 15-24 years decreased by 900 persons. Most gain in net population was by persons aged 55-69 which tends to suggest, sea change or tree change is given more weight than availability of services. Nevertheless, these trends may change over time unless additional services for an aging population are catered for in the region. This includes health services as well as other personal services.

 

The move to regional areas will reduce as sea or tree change will reduce as it does not reflect the emergent multiculturalism of the general demographic to Australia.

As stated above the current growth is largely contributed to by the net migration of persons aged between 55-69 years of age. Despite emergent trends in Australian demographics, it is likely that regional areas such as the Coffs Coast (including the Nambucca LGA) will continue to be an attractive area for retirement and other migration. As stated previously Council will continue to monitor population change over time and adjust strategies where necessary.

 

The population projections supporting the project are flexible and have generally be proven incorrect.

The reports accompanying the application acknowledge that estimates on population growth are subject to a number of factors and variations. The reports prepared are based on Council and state Government adopted strategies and plans which is the most current and reliable information available at present.

 

Regional development in non mining areas is problematic

Comments noted.

 

All regional areas are competing for development. Nambucca would be very low on the expansion priority list.

Comments noted, however the Mid North Coast Regional Strategy fails to prioritise regional development. Rather it identifies future growth areas required to meet the demands of growth over the region. It is up to local government areas to consider when these areas should be considered for release. Councils Local Growth Management Strategy - Employment Lands identifies this area should be considered for release in the short-medium term.

 

The argument that Nambucca is midway between Brisbane and Sydney is not a valid point to justify the proposal. This needs further examination before commitments to the development are made.

The location of the growth area in relation to Brisbane and Sydney may not be seen as advantage to all industry, however some may see the benefits being located here as well as between the two regional centres of Port Macquarie and Coffs Harbour. The Local Growth Management Strategy identifies a number of potential industry types that would benefit from this central location.

 

The risk identified of not proceeding at this time suggests short_to_medium Term employment will be impacted adversely is not justified. Clearly with current and trending economic and population movements, the prospect of the proposed development generating employment in the short to medium term is remote.

It may take some time to be in a position to have all plans for the growth area complete and services in place to allow development to occur on the land. The Local Growth Management Strategy suggests that Council should have a ready supply of employment lands to ensure prices are maintained at an affordable level and demand for certain sites requirements can be met. Progressing investigations now will allow Council to have a ready supply and meet future demands as they arise.

 

The suggestion that one fifth of the heavy vehicles passing through Nambucca shire will be to service this area is questionable.

Comments Noted.

 

Other nearby shires are also investigating transport cargo interchanges and heavy vehicle exchange facilities.

The RTA has identified a heavy transport interchange in the vicinity of the Valla Urban Growth Area. This has been approved as part of the Pacific Highway Improvement program. It may be that other areas are also provided with these types of facilities. The location of these facilities and the Highway upgrade is matter for the RTA consideration.

 

Consideration of the development should be delayed to allow consideration of changing economic and internal migration patterns to evolve with more predictability.

The 2011 census data will be available in 2012 and this information will be given consideration during the preparation of the DCP for the area which requires Council to prepare a staging plan for the timely and efficient release of urban land making provision for necessary infrastructure and sequencing.

 

The majority of regional development should target Coffs Harbour and Port Macquarie

Comments Noted

 

The demand which should be driving the planning is rubbery. It does not consider alternatives for any residential growth being satisfied by residential infill, that would be driven by population demands, especially of an aging population and the pattern of migration to the area.

Council is yet to commence its Local Growth Management Strategy - Residential Lands however previous strategies have identified the area for future growth by 2011-2016 (RDM 1996). In terms of residential land the Mid North Coast Regional Strategy indicates that the combined growth areas of the Mid North Coast caters for 59,600 new homes by 2031 for a forecast population increase of 94,000. The strategy expects that this supply of new residential land will respond to population increases in the region and assist with housing affordability. It will also provide opportunities for aged care facilities to support an aging population.

 

It appears the development is supply driven rather than demand driven.

Supply of unconstrained land is required to maintain affordability and choice for varying land uses.

 

The process should be shelved until the present changes in the Australian and global economy and how they will impact on regional development are properly assessed. All indications are that regional areas without good agricultural land, saleable energy sources or metals to be mined, will be hard put to attract, or indeed require urban residential growth.

The planning proposal suggests a 6 year planning and development phase prior to the land being market ready. It is uncertain how the global economy will be positioned at this time, however proceeding with investigations and planning processes at present will ensure that well designed, serviced and affordable land will be available to meet demands as they arise. The Council will maintain viable agricultural land and resources through provisions in its Local Environmental Plan, DCP and state government policies.

 

Council is strongly discouraged from committing any funds to further explore this project.

To date Council has contributed $60,000 to the investigations of the area through the 2009-2010 budget. Other funding attributed to the process has been through various grant programs. Although Council will continue to have a significant role in the preparation of the DCP and other plans for the area, Council contributions to funding of the project will be limited from this point unless otherwise directed by the Council.

 

A list of those people who signed in as attending the public meeting held on 7 November 2011 is also attached.

 

Consultants engaged by the two main landholders.

 

 


Consultants engaged by Council:

 

·              Department of State Forests

·              Northern Rivers Catchment Management Authority

·              Trans Grid

·              Department of Transport

·              Telstra New Estates

·              Essential Energy

·              NSW Office of Water

·              Valuer General ’s Department

·              Departments of Arts, Sport and Recreation

·              Department of Ageing, Disability and Home Care Services

·              Department of Aboriginal Affairs

 

 

SUSTAINABILITY ASSESSMENT:

 

Environment

 

The studies undertaken by both the landholder consultants and Council's consultants have undertaken a comprehensive review of the Environmental, Social and Economic impacts and benefits of the proposed rezoning for the Valla Urban Growth Area and the broader Nambucca Local Government Area

 

Social

 

The studies undertaken by both the landholder consultants and Council's consultants have undertaken a comprehensive review of the Environmental, Social and Economic impacts and benefits of the proposed rezoning for the Valla Urban Growth Area and the broader Nambucca Local Government Area

 

Economic

 

The studies undertaken by both the landholder consultants and Council's consultants have undertaken a comprehensive review of the Environmental, Social and Economic impacts and benefits of the proposed rezoning for the Valla Urban Growth Area and the broader Nambucca Local Government Area

 

Risk

 

Council has continued to support the Valla Urban Growth Area as its main area to accommodate and provide for additional employment and residential land within the shire.  Should Council withdraw its support now there would be limited locations and resources available to pursue Employment Lands in alternative sites.  This may have a detrimental result on the supply of medium and short term employment lands within the shire.

 

 


FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS:

 

Direct and indirect impact on current and future budgets

 

Proceeding to the final stage of this Planning Proposal would result in minimal being incurred other than staff time in preparing the final documents, plans etc for submission to the Department of Planning and Infrastructure.

 

Should the Minister make the Plan, then there is a range of works to be completed. Council’s main interest and involvement will relate to infrastructure and ensuring that Section 94 and 64 Plans are prepared and in place.

 

Notwithstanding the above, it is proposed that any Council funds dedicated to the project will be reclaimed by way of a Section 94 Contributions Plan at the development stage.

 

Source of fund and any variance to working funds

 

No variation sought. However once the Plan is made Council will be presented with a relevant budget to assist with the preparation of the various plans etc.

 

Attachments:

1View

33718/2011 - Samantha Cox - Submission

 

2View

33720/2011 - Dr Bennett - Submission

 

3View

32797/2011 - Mr P J and Mrs J A Mackay - Submission

 

4View

32922/2011 - EPA response regarding Stage 1 rezoning (Planning Proposal) - Valla Growth Area

 

5View

33033/2011 - Geoff Smyth Consulting acting on behalf of DS and VA Marriott - Submission

 

6View

34444/2011 - M Bevan - Submission

 

7View

33088/2011 - NSW Rural Fire Service - Comments

 

8View

34445/2011 - M Wilson - Submission

 

9View

33402/2011 - Mr P Rundle - Submission

 

10View

33403/2011 - Mrs M Rundle - Submission

 

11View

34447/2011 - Resources & Energy, Investment of Trade and Investment, Regional Infrastructure and Services - Submission

 

12View

34105/2011 - Late - Comments from referral of planning proposal Stage 1 Rezoning - Valla Growth Area - Department of Primary Industries, Fisheries and Agricultural Divisions

 

13View

34448/2011 - Late - Valla Urban Growth Submission - Nambucca Valley Conservation Association Inc

 

14View

34412/2011 - Attendance Sheet - 7 November 2011 - Public Meeting - Nambucca Heads

 

  


General Purpose Committee - 14 December 2011

Valla Urban Growth Area - Planning Proposal

 

From: samantha cox [mailto:samanthacox2@bigpond.com]

Sent: Friday, 4 November 2011 8:24 AM

To: Grant Nelson

Subject: 317 Boggy Creek Road

 

 

Hi Grant

 

Following on from our recent telephone conversation, I write this submission querying why our property at 317 Boggy Creek Road, Valla has been omitted from the proposed rezoning of the Valla growth area? We are  payng residential/rural rates.

 

What consideration has been given to noise barriers in relation to the new highway upgrade and rezoning development?.

Your assistance in this matter is greatly appreciated

Kind Regards 

Samantha Cox  

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General Purpose Committee - 14 December 2011

Valla Urban Growth Area - Planning Proposal

 

Nov 10 2011 - re Valla Urban Growth Area Stage 1

 

 

Dear Sir/Madam

 

I recently attended a council information evening in Nambucca on this development proposal

and would like to make the following points:

 

Apparently this proposal began as a broad State Government initiative to identify future industrial zoning land, yet now a town is proposed almost double the size of Valla Beach, in association with the industrial area - how has this happened?

The proposed development is on prime agricultural land which climate change concerns is a very valuable resource, modelling suggests Victoria will lose substantial amount of agricultural resources.

The flora and fauna surveys identified habitat suitable for threatened species like the Yellow-bellied Gliders and quoll, though these species were not seen during the surveys. I live opposite Jagun Nature Reserve - it used to have Yellow-bellied Gliders but no more, probably due to the new developments, but I heard a Koala there two weeks ago, and it was photographed. A koala has not been seen here since 1986, yet it is back due to habitat conservation. Threatened species like quolls and gliders require habitat for hunting, feeding, sleeping, rearing young, in short for living. They have no hope for a long term future unless their habitat is carefully conserved. Once habitat is lost it is gone for ever.

9 threatened species and 4 endangered ecological communities were identified yet the latest flora and fauna survey concludes that their presence is not relevant to refer the development to the Commonwealth Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities "as not likely to impact on a significant population of nationally listed threatened species or endangered ecological communities." [My underlining] There is no sense here of the Precautionary Principle, rather the opposite - a disturbing number and level of caveats.

 

 

The Conservation Management Strategy (Aug 2011) suggests:

long term monitoring (so if there are unfortunate consequences, will the development will be removed, like a movie run backwards, as if nothing happened? – and making contingency plans for ‘compensatory measures.” I would just repeat that once habit is lost it is gone, it cannot be replanted or repaired.

 

 

There is no proven need for this development but there is a proven need to save our biodiversity and preserve the lifestyle, vistas and character of this beautiful region. 

 

 

 

 

Yours faithfully,

 

 

 

Dr John Bennett

26 Birugna Close

Valla Beach


General Purpose Committee - 14 December 2011

Valla Urban Growth Area - Planning Proposal

 







General Purpose Committee - 14 December 2011

Valla Urban Growth Area - Planning Proposal

 








General Purpose Committee - 14 December 2011

Valla Urban Growth Area - Planning Proposal

 





General Purpose Committee - 14 December 2011

Valla Urban Growth Area - Planning Proposal

 


General Purpose Committee - 14 December 2011

Valla Urban Growth Area - Planning Proposal

 



General Purpose Committee - 14 December 2011

Valla Urban Growth Area - Planning Proposal

 



General Purpose Committee - 14 December 2011

Valla Urban Growth Area - Planning Proposal

 





General Purpose Committee - 14 December 2011

Valla Urban Growth Area - Planning Proposal

 



General Purpose Committee - 14 December 2011

Valla Urban Growth Area - Planning Proposal

 



General Purpose Committee - 14 December 2011

Valla Urban Growth Area - Planning Proposal

 



General Purpose Committee - 14 December 2011

Valla Urban Growth Area - Planning Proposal

 



General Purpose Committee - 14 December 2011

Valla Urban Growth Area - Planning Proposal

 

 


General Purpose Committee                                                                                         14 December 2011

Director of Engineering Services Report

ITEM 11.1    SF593              141211         Nambucca Flood Investigation – Phase 2 Seaview Street, Nambucca Heads

 

AUTHOR/ENQUIRIES:     Keith Williams, Manager Technical Services         

 

Summary:

 

At its General Purpose Committee meeting of 16 November 2011 Council sought clarification on the definition associated with Recommendation No 3 of the Nambucca Flood Investigation – Phase 2 Seaview Street report and resolved the following:

 

          ‘That the following recommendation be deferred to Council’s meeting on 17 November 2011 to allow for definitions to be provided for the terms and categories used:

 

                  That Council adopt a drainage design standard in accordance with the Australian Rainfall and Runoff (AR&R) and AUS-SPEC#1 Design Specifications September 2002 for future urban developments as follows:

 

                  ·         100 years for the ‘major’ system in all developments

                  ·         20 or 50 years for intensely developed business, commercial and

                             industrial areas

                  ·         10 years for other businesses, commercial and industrial areas and

                             intensely developed residential areas

                  ·         5 years for other residential areas and open spaces

                  ·         In addition, where a development is designed in such a way that the

                             major system flows involve surcharge across private property, then

                             the underground system (both pipes and inlets) shall be designed to

                             permit flows into and contain flows having an ARI of 100 years from

                             the upstream catchment which would otherwise flow across the

                             property.’

 

A late report was presented to council on 17 November 2011 following the resolution from the General Purpose Committee meeting with definitions of terms and categories used. Minor modifications to the wording of the original recommendation were made the report to remove the ambiguity of terms, Council resolved to further defer the matter to allow time to adequately read the report.

 

 

Recommendation:

 

That Council adopt a drainage design standard in accordance with AUS-SPEC#1 Design Specifications September 2002 for future urban developments as follows:

 

·      Major system in all developments 1 in 100 yr ARI

·      Main trunk  drainage systems (Minor) 1 in 20 yr ARI

·      Commercial/industrial area (Minor) 1 in 20 yr ARI

·      Inter-allotment drainage 1 in 20 yr ARI 

·      Rural residential area (Minor) 1 in 5 yr ARI

·      Urban Residential Areas (Minor) 1 in 5 yr ARI

·      Parks and recreation area (Minor) 1 in 1 yr ARI

 

            In addition, where a development is designed in such a way that the major system flows involve surcharge across private property, then the underground system (both pipes and inlets) shall be designed to permit flows into and contain flows having an ARI of 100 years from the upstream catchment which would otherwise flow across the property.’

 

 

OPTIONS:

 

i         Accept the definitions

ii        Ask for more information

 

DISCUSSION:

 

At its General Purpose Committee meeting of 16 November 2011 council were presented with a report Nambucca Flood Investigation – Phase 2 Seaview Street, with a number of recommendations for consideration. All other recommendations were adopted with the exception of:

 

That Council adopt a drainage design standard in accordance with the Australian Rainfall and Runoff (AR&R) and AUS-SPEC#1 Design Specifications September 2002 for future urban developments as follows:

 

                                      100 years for the major system in all developments

                                      20 or 50 years for intensely developed business, commercial and

                             industrial areas

                                      10 years for other businesses, commercial and industrial areas and

                                      intensely developed residential areas

                                      5 years for other residential areas and open spaces

                                      In addition, where a development is designed in such a way that the

                             major system flows involve surcharge across private property, then

                             the underground system (both pipes and inlets) shall be designed to

                             permit flows into and contain flows having an ARI of 100 years from

                             the upstream catchment which would otherwise flow across the

                             property.

 

Council sought further clarification of a certain terms and categories used in the original recommendation, and a further report was presented to council 17 November 2011 with definitions of terms used, this report was subsequently deferred.

 

This report now provides the required definitions of terms and categories used in the recommendation for council’s information.

 

Background

 

The main purpose of urban drainage systems is to collect and convey stormwater to receiving waters, with minimal nuisance, danger or damage while limiting pollutants entering the receiving waters.

 

The road and trunk drainage system is typically used to convey water collected in gully pits along the roads as well as overflows to the receiving waters. It consists of a network of pipes, overland flow paths and natural and constructed channels. The care, control and management of this system is the responsibility of Council so any work performed on it may only be carried out with Council’s knowledge and approval.

 

Definition Major/minor system

 

Streets are normally drained by networks of gutters, pits and pipes. Runoff is collected from properties and adjoining streets, as well as road surfaces and discharged to trunk drains and receiving waters.

 

The major/minor approach to urban drainage design is the adopted standard for councils in Australia as outlined in Australian Rainfall and Runoff.

 

Minor system

The minor system is defined as the gutter and pipe network capable of carrying runoff and nuisance flows from minor storms of a 1 to 5 year Average Recurrence Interval (ARI).  The pipelines prevent stormwater damage to properties and also limit the frequency and quantity of surface water to a level that is acceptable to the community.

 

Major system

A major drainage system caters for the runoff from storms of higher intensity than for which the minor drainage system has been designed. The major drainage system is designed to handle flows resulting from rare storm events up to and including a 100-year ARI. These flows shall follow a designated overland flow path, which shall be:

 

•        A road if the catchment area is small; and/or

•        A drainage reserve if it is impractical or unsafe for a road to carry the excess flows.

 

See attached sketch of the major/minor stormwater drainage system.

 

Definition Trunk Drainage

Trunk drains are large capacity channel or conduits which carry runoff from local street drainage systems to receiving waters.  They are typically natural or artificial channels located in dedicated drainage easements or right of way.

 

Design Rainfalls

 

The Average Recurrence Interval (ARI) and the Annual Exceedance Probability(AEP) are both a measure of the rarity of a rainfall event.

 

Relationship between ARI and AEP

The relationship is defined by the following formula:

AEP = 1 – exp(-1/ARI)

The 1% AEP and the 100 year ARI events are effectively the same magnitude, and can be used interchangeably, however as you get to ARI's below 10 years, the AEP and ARI events start to differ as is shown in the table below:

 

ARI (years)

AEP (%)

1

63.2%

2

39.3%

5

18.1%

10

9.5%

20

4.9%

50

2%

100

1%

ARI's of greater than 10 years are closely approximated by the reciprocal of the AEP.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Average Recurrence Interval (ARI)

 

Current Australian practise is to use the design average recurrence interval (ARI) values for street drainage systems.

 

Average recurrence interval is the likelihood of occurrence, expressed in terms of the long-term average number of years, between flood events as large as or larger than the design flood event. It should be noted that, a rainfall (or flood) ARI of 100 years does not imply the event will only occur every 100 years; it is also feasible that the event will occur five times in five successive years and not occur for another 495 years.

 

Annual Exeedance Probability (AEP)

 

The annual exceedance probability is the probability of exceedance of a given event within a period of one year.

 

The 100-year flood is more accurately referred to as the 1% annual exceedance probability flood, since it is a flood that has a 1% chance of being equaled or exceeded in any single year. Similarly, a flood level expected to be equaled or exceeded every 10 years on average is known as a ten-year flood.

 

Delete - Intensely developed business, commercial and industrial areas and Intensely developed residential areas

 

Australian Rainfall and Runoff (AR&R) uses the term “Intensely developed” for its adopted average recurrence intervals for underground drainage systems. In the report of presented to the General Purpose Committee 16 November 2011 It was recommended that council adopt the AR&R design ARI standards. However council does not have zones identified as intensely developed.

 

To prevent any ambiguity of the use of the term it is proposed to delete the wording intensely developed and adopt the standard used throughout NSW Auspec # 1 Design Specifications September 2002 for future urban developments as follows:

 

·      Major system in all developments 1 in 100 yr ARI

·      Main trunk  drainage systems (Minor) 1 in 20 yr ARI

·      Commercial/industrial area (Minor) 1 in 20 yr ARI

·      Inter-allotment drainage 1 in 20 yr ARI 

·      Rural residential area (Minor) 1 in 5 yr ARI

·      Urban Residential Areas (Minor) 1 in 5 yr ARI

·      Parks and recreation area (Minor) 1 in 1 yr ARI

 

            In addition, where a development is designed in such a way that the major system flows involve surcharge across private property, then the underground system (both pipes and inlets) shall be designed to permit flows into and contain flows having an ARI of 100 years from the upstream catchment which would otherwise flow across the property.’

 

 

CONSULTATION:

 

Council

Director Engineering Services

Manager Civil Works

GHD Consultants

 

 


SUSTAINABILITY ASSESSMENT:

 

Environment

 

The recommendations do not give rise to any environmental issues.

 

Social

 

The recommendations do not give rise to any social issues.

 

Economic

 

No items identified.

 

Risk

There is no risk associated with adopting the determination.

 

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS:

 

Direct and indirect impact on current and future budgets

 

No impact on current or future budgets

Source of fund and any variance to working funds

 

Not applicable

 

 

Attachments:

1View

32475/2011 - Sketch of the major/minor stormwater drainage system

 

  


General Purpose Committee - 14 December 2011

Nambucca Flood Investigation – Phase 2 Seaview Street, Nambucca Heads

 

 

 

 

 

MINOR SYSTEM

 

MAJOR SYSTEM

 
             

 


General Purpose Committee                                                                                         14 December 2011

Director of Engineering Services Report

ITEM 11.2    SF1575            141211         Asset Management Plans Summary      

 

AUTHOR/ENQUIRIES:     Peter Baynes, Manager Assets         

 

Summary:

 

None as this report is brief.

 

Recommendation:

 

1        That Council receive and note the report.

 

2        That the Asset Management Plan Summary be placed on public exhibit with the Community Strategic Plan until 27 January 2012.

 

 

DISCUSSION:

 

The attached report provides a summary of various asset management plans for exhibition with the Community Strategic Plan.  The report encapsulates the key issues with major asset classes and provides a summary of the proposed 10 year work program including an indication of where funds from the proposed 2% special rate variation will be spent.

 

CONSULTATION:

 

General Manager

Director Engineering Services

 

SUSTAINABILITY ASSESSMENT:

 

Environment

Environmental factors have been considered in developing the asset management plans.

 

Social

The asset management plans attempt to address community concerns regarding level of service from Council’s infrastructure assets.

 

Economic

Provision of adequate levels of service from infrastructure assets contribute to the economy of the Shire.

 

Risk

Asset management plans attempt to balance risk issues associated with asset condition and performance with the cost of service delivery.

 

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS:

 

Direct and indirect impact on current and future budgets

The proposed work plan forecasts expenditure above current budget allowances.  Review of the work program and budget position will be required as annual budgets are set.

 

Source of fund and any variance to working funds

General fund, loans and grants.

 

Attachments:

1View

34473/2011 - Asset Management Plans Summary for IPR

 

2View

 - Circularised Document - Consolidtated 10 year work plan (Trim 34475/2011)

 

  


General Purpose Committee - 14 December 2011

Asset Management Plans Summary  

 

 

ASSET MANAGEMENT PLANS SUMMARY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


December 2011


General Purpose Committee - 14 December 2011

Asset Management Plans Summary  

 

ASSET MANAGEMENT PLANS SUMMARY

 

What is Asset Management?

 

Asset Management is the management of assets to ensure the provision of agreed levels of service in the most cost effective manner and within a tolerable risk profile.

Council is in the early stages of implementing an asset management strategy and, like many local government bodies in NSW, is coming to grips with the reality of managing an ageing asset portfolio within the constraints of available funding.

 

Asset Management Plans

 

Asset management plans are prepared to demonstrate responsible management of infrastructure assets and services provided from those assets, compliance with regulatory requirements and communicate funding required to provide the required levels of service.  These plans are to be read in conjunction with Council's 20 Year Community Strategic Plan, Infrastructure Management Plan and Annual Budget.

 

Proposed Work Program

 

The Integrated Planning and Reporting (IPR) framework requires Council to develop a 10 year program of maintenance and capital works on infrastructure assets to enable ongoing delivery of agreed levels of service from these assets.  The following sections discuss the major components of the 10 year program.

Council is also applying for an additional 2% rate increase for additional revenue to fund a loan of $1.5M to improve the sealed road network.  Work funded by this loan would include heavy patching for sections of failed pavement, resealing and additional maintenance of roadside drainage and road shoulders.

 

 

TRANSPORT

 

What are Transport Assets?

 

Council provides a network of transportation infrastructure assets to meet the community need for provision of transport services.  These assets are provided with the assistance of State and Federal Governments.  The following table shows the current replacement value of these assets.


 


Asset Category

Dimensions

Replacement Value

($M)

Sealed Rural Roads

247km

72

Urban Streets

105km

34.3

Unsealed Rural Roads

345km

13.4

Bridges

170 (16,650m2)

32.4

Culverts

1,607 (21,500m2)

5.6

Footpaths

38km

4.3

Kerb and Gutter

150km

12

Parking Areas

19,180m2

1

TOTAL

 

175

 

 

The condition of Council’s major transport assets is presented in the following charts.

 

Condition is measured using a 1 – 5 rating system.

 

Rating

Description of Condition

1

Very Good:  As good as new.  Planned maintenance required.

2

Good:  Acceptable physical condition.  Minor maintenance required.

3

Fair:  Deteriorated but travelling OK.  Significant maintenance required.

4

Poor:  Needs close monitoring and attention

5

Very Poor:  Failed or failure imminent.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Resident Satisfaction and Service Levels

 

Council has conducted Resident Satisfaction Surveys in 2007 and 2010.  These surveys allowed Shire residents to rate the importance of services provided by Council and to express their level of satisfaction with the provision of those services.  In the most recent survey all transport services with the exception of footpaths were rated as Low satisfaction.  Of particular note is that unsealed roads rated the lowest satisfaction of all Council services.

These low satisfaction levels when combined with established asset management principles, industry benchmarks for asset refurbishment and examples of good practice reflect that current maintenance and renewal expenditure is not sufficient to ensure ongoing provision of acceptable levels of service from transport infrastructure assets.

 

Maintenance of the Sealed Road Network

Despite past work on road rehabilitation and sealing a significant proportion of Council’s sealed road network is still in fair to poor condition with, in many cases, recent work failing well in advance of expectation.  A major contributing factor to the poor state of the network is that although the road pavement and seal has received attention over the years maintenance of roadside drainage and road shoulders has not received adequate attention.  Poor drainage of water from the sealed surface due to growth of roadside vegetation and accumulated gravel and soil along the road’s edge leads to accelerated failure of the road seal which allows water ingress into the underlying pavement.  This water ingress when combined with poor drainage of rainwater from alongside the road pavement results in the pavement material becoming weakened and susceptible to failure due to heavy traffic loads, particularly adjacent to the road shoulder.

Generally these sealed roads would have been built with a nominal design life of 30 year.  The optimal cycle of road maintenance includes a reseal every 10 years to reinstate the waterproof membrane as the old bitumen oxidises, becomes brittle then cracks allowing water to enter the underlying pavement.  After 30 years the road reaches the end of its design life.  The road pavement is rebuilt by utilising cement stabilisation or new material and a two coat bitumen seal.  This restores the pavement strength and improves the waterproofing of the pavement as well.  The 30 year cycle then starts again.

The above cycle is a generalisation as there are many factors that affect the life such as traffic numbers, percentage of heavy vehicles, rainfall, durability of aggregate etc, that lengthen or shorten the number of years.  An ideal maintenance program based on this cycle would require Council to rehabilitate 8.2km of road and reseal 16.5km of road each year.

Historically Council’s work program has included from 2.75km to 5.2km of rehabilitation per year and approximately 7km of resealing, well short of the desirable level.  At this rate it will take Council approximately 50 years to renew a road network with a design life of 30 years.  Obviously this is not a sustainable program as ageing road assets will continue to deteriorate and indeed the rate of deterioration will increase as portions of the network exceed their design life.

 

Proposed Work Program – Sealed Road Network

As mentioned above, expenditure on road rehabilitation and resealing is ineffective if sufficient attention is not paid to roadside shoulder and drainage maintenance.  It is also prudent to repair isolated pavement failures through a program of “heavy patching” to ensure that adequate pavement material of suitable quality is in place prior to rehabilitation of the road.

The proposed 10 year work program includes an allowance of $100K per annum for the first two years for maintenance of roadside drainage and road shoulders, particularly prior to rehabilitating or resealing sections of road.  Allowing for variations due to terrain and existing conditions this amount should allow for attention to approximately 200km of the road network over the two year period.  Funding for this work would be provided by borrowings based on the proposed 2% special rate variation.

During 2011/12 a trial of heavy patching for rural sealed roads has been included in Council's work program.  Following success so far an additional $400K per annum has been included for the first two years of the 10 year work program for a program of heavy patching to allow specific attention to large pavement failures.  The intent is that over two years the majority of pavement failures can be rectified before continuance of an enhanced program of rehabilitation.  Once again funding for this work would be provided by borrowings based on the proposed 2% special rate variation.

In terms of expenditure the optimal program of rehabilitation and resealing equates to approximately $1.48M and $640K per annum respectively.  Historically expenditure has averaged $830K on rehabilitation and $400K on reseals.  An additional factor which is forcing an increase in the cost of road rehabilitation, and indeed reconstruction of many other assets, is the need to dispose of waste material at waste disposal sites which comes at a cost rather than historic work practices which would have seen much of this material disposed on, or close to, the worksite.

The following charts show historical expenditure on sealed road rehabilitation and annual resealing compared with the optimal expenditure required to meet the requirements of a 30 year design life.  Also shown is planned expenditure of $1.1M for rehabilitation and $550K for resealing set at a level to partially bridge the gap between the two.

The planned expenditure programs do not attempt to fully bridge the gap in recognition that Council’s ability to fund a comprehensive program is limited and also that in reality some of the road network will remain in serviceable condition beyond the nominal design life.  Along with this increased level of expenditure will be a review of work practices with increased attention to full road design and reconstruction where appropriate rather than the past practice of utilising cement stabilisation works as the primary means of road rehabilitation.

 

 

 

 

 

Proposed Work Program – Urban Street Network

Much of the discussion regarding sealed rural roads also applies to sealed urban streets.  The requirement to maintain the sealed service on a number of cycles prior to full rehabilitation being undertaken is the same.  Use of asphalt rather than bitumen spray seal is sometimes preferred in urban areas as it gives a smoother and quieter, longer wearing surface for heavily trafficked areas such as intersections and shopping precincts.

As with the rural road network provision of adequate drainage of water off the sealed surface and away from the underlying pavement is essential to ensuring longevity of the road network.  See the following section on kerb and gutter assets for discussion on management of these assets.

Progress has been achieved in rehabilitating streets across all urban areas over the last few years.  The proposed program allows for a combination of rehabilitation and resealing with specific streets to be identified following further assessment of current issues and street condition.  Generally work in the first 5 years of the program will focus on the towns of Bowraville, Macksville and Nambucca Heads.  Future work will be required in Scotts Head, Valla Beach and Hyland Park, then attention will be required in semi urban areas such as Palmwood, Kingsworth and Eungai. 

Large pavement failures, which result from isolated issues with pavement material quality, poor drainage and heavy vehicle traffic, are also occurring in the urban areas and once again the rate of occurrence has accelerated in recent times.  As with the rural road network attention to these failures before rehabilitation is undertaken is key to achieving optimal results from the rehabilitation works.

 

During 2011/12 a $250K trial of heavy patching for urban streets has been included in Council's work program.  Following success so far an additional $100K per annum has been included for the first two years of the 10 year work program for a program of heavy patching to allow specific attention to large pavement failures.  Once again funding for this work would be provided by borrowings based on the proposed 2% special rate variation. 

 

Proposed Work Program – Unsealed Road Network

Council's unsealed road network is maintained through a program of regular grading with the addition of fresh gravel sheeting as necessary.  The condition of unsealed road surfaces is very dynamic and subject to sudden change under circumstances of differing weather conditions and changed traffic usage.  Although an unsealed road is not necessarily reconstructed on a cyclic basis, as is a sealed road, there are opportunities to apply more rigorous grading techniques as well as ensuring the supporting roadside drains and shoulders are well maintained

Historically the predominant maintenance regime has been a program of light grading which is very much dependant on weather conditions to ensure optimal moisture content for grading.  Council is reviewing the work practices associated with maintenance of the unsealed road network to incorporate more heavy grading with use of water carting to ensure moisture levels are ideal, use of heavy rollers to ensure sufficient compaction and improved maintenance of the roadside drains and shoulders.  The proposed 10 year program allows for a combination of light grading and heavy grading.

 


Proposed Work Program – Bridges and Culverts

The selection of bridges for replacement is based on the condition of the structure and a priority rating that takes into account factors such as traffic counts and load limits to determine the priority.  Some of the load limited bridges have received a high priority as they will not remain serviceable long enough and will face closure.  Regular condition assessments may show changing priorities from year to year, particularly if severe rainfall events are experienced.

The following chart shows the condition of Council’s bridges.

 

 

Bridges in the Shire have generally been of timber construction with timber substructure and decking with some bridges at particular locations constructed in concrete.  Over recent years replacement of timber bridges has increasingly been with bridges having timber substructures and pre-cast concrete decks.

Generally timber bridges are less expensive to construct but have a shorter life than concrete bridges.  When assessed over the expected life of the bridge these factors tend to cancel out giving somewhat comparable life cycle costs, particularly for bridges in lightly trafficked areas.  The most significant factor is the higher maintenance cost component associated with timber structures and this tends to be more of an issue with larger and heavier trafficked bridges making concrete construction more attractive for these structures where the higher initial construction costs for concrete structures are offset by the higher maintenance costs of timber substructures.  The decision to implement one construction type or the other is determined on factors such as site specific conditions, traffic levels and expected loads.  Detailed assessment and engineering design will confirm the particular construction method and material as the program is rolled out. 

The proposed program allows for a mix of all concrete and timber/concrete bridges.  The proposed program will see 40 road bridges reconstructed over the 10 year planning period.  This is based on achieving a realistic workload and retaining sufficient flexibility for adjustment should the need arise.  A more aggressive program could see these bridges constructed over a shorter timeframe, however there is minimal benefit from doing so as most of the remaining bridges have remaining lives assessed at significantly over 10 years.

 

 

 

Detailed planning for replacement of concrete culverts is yet to be completed.  Preliminary assessment indicates that approximately 12% of these assets will require replacement over years 5 to 10 of this plan and this expense has been included.

 

Proposed Work Program – Footpaths

Council has had a policy for some time of not constructing new footpath assets.  This has been to allow attention to be given to improving the condition of the existing footpath network.  An additional factor has been Council’s strategy of adopting a balanced budget position from one year to the next.  Historically other works have been seen as a higher priority than the construction of new footpaths.

It is anticipated that in the 10 year life of this plan there will be a need to renew aged sections of the network in the initial years.  In the second half of this plan’s life increasing the extent of the network may be necessary along with significant reconstruction of aged sections of the existing network.  On this basis this plan shows expenditure of $85K per annum over the first 5 years for reconstruction of approximately 10% of the footpath network increasing to $215K per annum thereafter for reconstruction of existing assets and/or construction of new footpaths in the second half of the plan’s timeframe.

Construction of new footpaths is also carried out by developers of new subdivisions and then transferred to Council for ongoing maintenance and eventual refurbishment.  It is not anticipated that any of these gifted assets will require replacement or major refurbishment in the life of this plan.

Council’s cycleway plan proposes extension of the cycleway from South Nambucca to Macksville.  This work will be subject to availability of funding from RMS but has been shown in this plan for the sake of completeness.

 

Proposed Work Program – Kerb and Gutter

Historically funding for restoration of damaged sections of kerb and gutter has been restricted as a result of Council’s strategy of adopting a balanced budget position from one year to the next.  Previously other works have been seen as a higher priority than the reconstruction of damaged kerb and gutter.

However there remains a need to renew sections of kerb and gutter damaged by heavy traffic associated with kerbside waste collection.  The need to repair this damage is increasing as the rate of deterioration increases.

As discussed in the section on urban street maintenance failed sections of kerb and gutter also contribute to accelerated failure of the adjoining sealed road as poor drainage of rainwater from alongside the road pavement results in the pavement material becoming weakened and susceptible to failure due to heavy traffic loads, particularly adjacent to the road shoulder.

On this basis this plan shows expenditure of $100K per annum for reconstruction of approximately 500m of kerb and gutter per year for the first 5 years of this plan, increasing to $200K per annum thereafter to allow for increased deterioration as sections of kerb and gutter approach the end of their service life.  The first two years of this program will be funded by borrowings based on the proposed 2% special rate variation.

 

 

Construction of new kerb and gutter assets is carried out by developers of new subdivisions and then transferred to Council for ongoing maintenance and eventual refurbishment.  It is not anticipated that any of these gifted assets will require replacement or major refurbishment in the life of this plan.

 

STORMWATER

 

What are Stormwater Assets?

 

Council provides a network of stormwater infrastructure assets to meet the community need for provision of drainage services.  These assets are provided to ensure the drainage of rainwater from developed areas to natural collection channels and waterways.  The following table shows the current replacement value of these assets.

 

 

Asset Category

Dimensions

Replacement Value

($M)

Sumps

2,500

1.8

Large Pipes (>450mm)

13.5km

5.1

Small Pipes (<450mm)

43.6km

12.2

 

Resident Satisfaction and Service Levels

 

Council has conducted Resident Satisfaction Surveys in 2007 and 2010.  These surveys allowed Shire residents to rate the importance of services provided by Council and to express their level of satisfaction with the provision of those services.  In the most recent survey stormwater drainage was rated as Low satisfaction.

 

Proposed Work Program – Stormwater Network

Stormwater management has three issues to address over the life of the plan. They are:

 

·    The provision of stormwater networks where none exist

·    The augmentation of systems to increase capacity to deal with increased development within urban catchments

·    The improvement of water quality by trapping litter and sediments.

 

Historically projects have been selected from known problems that have arisen during heavy rainfall events and from individual catchment assessments to identify deficiencies.

As Council further develops the asset management process for stormwater assets a more comprehensive asset management strategy for these assets will be established with objectives set for augmentation and extension of the network.  A particular issue to be faced is the combined effects of additional development in areas where stormwater drains had previously been established and the setting of higher standards in terms of rainfall events and flood management.

It is expected that these factors will have a two-fold effect.  Firstly the need to provide stormwater drainage where it was not previously required, and secondly the potential need to upgrade existing infrastructure including addition of gross pollutant traps in several locations.  The scope of these works is not yet quantified and will need to be assessed on a catchment by catchment basis, but as a guide recent studies in Nambucca Heads indicate that a single catchment may require in the order of $500K to $1M to mitigate drainage issues associated with severe rainfall events.  Indicative expenditures of this order are included in the proposed work program.

At this stage the 10 year plan aims to renew 30% of the oldest stormwater assets in the latter years of the plan at an estimated cost of $3M.

 

 

Some allowance for system augmentation has also been made, however new developments will be required to incorporate adequate stormwater systems and, where necessary, detention basins to control inflows to existing downstream systems.


BUILDINGS

 

What are Building Assets?

 

Council has a range of building which are used for the housing of Council's administration and works staff and to allow the provision of services for and by the community of the Nambucca Shire.  Many of these buildings are managed by committees of Council who share the costs and responsibilities for maintenance and upkeep.  The following table shows the current replacement value of these assets.

 

Asset Category

Replacement Value

($M)

Council Administration Building

3.1

Community Halls

13

Council Works Depot

1

RFS/SES Headquarters

3

Libraries

3.7

Museums

2.5

Public Amenities

9.5

Other Buildings

3.7

TOTAL

36.5

 

 

Resident Satisfaction and Service Levels

 

Council has conducted Resident Satisfaction Surveys in 2007 and 2010.  These surveys allowed Shire residents to rate the importance of services provided by Council and to express their level of satisfaction with the provision of those services.  In the most recent survey all building services with the exception of public toilets were rated as High satisfaction.

 

Proposed Work Program – Buildings

The general condition of Council buildings varies greatly and in the main reflects past maintenance, or lack of it, at each individual site.  Over recent years additional effort has gone into managing the maintenance of buildings to maintain condition and ensure compliance with regulatory requirements such as essential fire service and electrical testing.

The maintenance regime is forecast to continue over the next 10 years and, in addition, capital expenditure is planned to redress a number of significant asset replacement and renewal needs.  These include:

·    Roofs at a number of community halls and buildings

·    Public amenities

·    Work at a number of sporting facilities

·    Air conditioning and roof at the Council administration building

 

PARKS, RECREATION and COMMUNITY ASSETS

 

What are Parks and Recreation Assets?

 

Council has a range of infrastructure assets that provide parks, reserve and recreation facilities within the shire.

 

·    Parks and Recreation Areas

·    Sporting Fields

·    Aquatic Centre

·    Showground and Saleyards

·    Boat ramps and Beach Access

·    Foreshore Developments

·    Playgrounds & Playground Equipment

·    Gardens

 

Resident Satisfaction and Service Levels

 

Council has conducted Resident Satisfaction Surveys in 2007 and 2010.  These surveys allowed Shire residents to rate the importance of services provided by Council and to express their level of satisfaction with the provision of those services.  In the most recent survey parks, reserves and playgrounds and saleyards were rated as High satisfaction.

 

Proposed Work Program – Parks and Recreation

Asset management plans are yet to be prepared for many of these asset categories.  Further work is required to collect data on the physical location and condition of these assets, assess their financial value and determine life cycle maintenance and replacement programs.

Even though formal management plans have not been completed, several key issues have been identified for attention and inclusion in the forward work program.  These include:

·    Risk mitigation and effluent management at the Macksville saleyards

·    Renewal of the arena fence and pavilion roof at the Macksville showground

·    Renewal and refurbishment of plant and equipment at the Macksville Memorial Aquatic Centre

Longer term issues will likely include:

·    Cyclic replacement of playground equipment

·    Construction of shade structures at playgrounds

·    Renewal of boat ramps

·    Refurbishment of the main pool shell at the Macksville Memorial Aquatic Centre

·    Further development of foreshore and river front areas

·    Mitigation of drainage issues at sporting fields

WATER SUPPLY

 

What are water supply assets?

 

Council provides water supply services to the majority of residential as well as the commercial and industrial premises in the urban centres through the Nambucca District Water Supply (NDWS) scheme.  Many of the rural properties along the pipeline routes are also connected to the NDWS Scheme.  All other rural residents and commercial operations are supplied by their own on-site water catchment arrangements.

The NDWS Scheme was constructed in 1953 and serves all the urban centres including Nambucca Heads, Bowraville, Macksville, Scotts Head and Valla Beach.  The groundwater prior to distribution to customers, is adequately buffered with lime and carbon dioxide, disinfected with chlorine and fluoridated to minimise dental cavities.

The condition of Council’s major water supply assets is presented in the following Table.

 

Asset

 

No./Length/Capacity

 

Average Remaining Life

(Years)

 

Condition

1 – As new

5 – Poor

 

Bores and associated head works including water conditioning facility

 

1 No.

41

3

 

Water Pumping Station

 

2 Nos.

20

3

 

Service Reservoirs/Tanks

12 Nos.

 

64

2

 

Transfer mains and reticulation mains (including meters and service lines)

 

207.7 Km

43

3

 

Buildings, plants, equipment and other structures

 

-

-

3

 

 

Principal Issues

 

Current services are generally satisfactory.  There are however, some issues, which need to be addressed on priority.  These are:

·    Security of water supply

·    Meeting adopted levels of service and compliance with NSW Office of Water (NOW) Best Practice Guidelines

·    Protection of water sources from contamination

·    Service provision to urban growth areas

·    Water conservation and demand management

·    Equitable service pricing including developer charges

·    Optimising cost of pumping

·    Meeting customer service expectations and community consultations

·    Managing and funding long-term capital works program

·    Systematic rehabilitation and renewal of ageing assets

·    Maintaining skilled staff resources

 

Levels of Service

 

Council's primary objective with water supply services is to meet the adopted Levels of Service, which cover the following areas:

·    Availability of service

·    Pressure

·    Service complaints,

·    System failures,

·    Response times and complaints,

·    Water quality.

 

Proposed Work Program – Water Supply

 

When developing Council's Strategic Business Plan for Water Supply strategies were identified for achieving the objectives of the Plan and then specific actions were listed for implementation of these strategies.

The notable actions Council proposes to take over the next 10 years include:

·    Bowraville bore field capacity augmentation with off-river storage

·    Renewal of chlorination and fluoridation plants

·    Replacement of existing bore pumps

·    New reservoir for South Scotts Head (0.5 ML) and Valla Urban Growth Area (0.7 ML)

·    Recycled water schemes for South Scotts Head and Valla Urban Growth

·    Area

·    South Creek bore field capacity augmentation

 

Capital Works Program

 

The following is a summary of the major water supply capital works planned for Nambucca Shire Council over the next 10 years.  The justification for why they have been planned is also shown below.

 

Proposed Work

Year

Justification

Renewal of chlorination and fluoridation plants

 

2012

Water quality improvement and improved levels of service

Bowraville bore field capacity augmentation with off-river storage

2012 - 2014

Security of water supply and improved levels of service

 

Replacement of existing bore pumps

 

2015

Asset renewal and improved levels of service

 

New reservoir for South Scotts Head (0.5 ML) and Valla Urban Growth Area (0.7 ML)

 

2016

To cater for new urban developments

 

Recycled water schemes for South Scotts Head and Valla Urban Growth Area

 

2016 - 2017

Water conservation and improved levels of service

 

South Creek bore field capacity augmentation

 

2018 - 2020

Security of water supply and to cater for growth

 

 

 

SEWERAGE SERVICES

 

What are sewerage service assets?

 

Council operates four reticulated sewerage schemes servicing each of the main urban centres namely Bowraville, Macksville, Nambucca Heads and Scotts Head.  All other villages and rural settlements in the Council area are serviced by on-site sewage management systems.

The condition of Council’s major sewerage assets is presented in the following table.

 

Asset

Number/Length/Capacity

 

Average

Remaining

Life (Years)

 

Condition

1 – As new

5 – Poor

 

Sewer Mains (trunk and reticulation mains) including manholes

 

140.2 Km

34

3

 

Sewage Pumping Station

55 Nos

20

. 3

 

Rising mains

22.6 Km

Included above

 

Sewage Treatment Plant

4 Nos

16

. 3

 

 

Principal Issues

 

Current services are generally satisfactory. There are however, some issues, which need to be addressed. These are:

·    Meeting NSW Office of Water (NOW) Best Practice Management Guidelines and the adopted levels of services

·    Managing inflow and infiltration and sewer overflows

·    Equitable service pricing including trade waste fees and developer charges

·    Meeting customer service expectations

·    Meeting Office of Environment and Heritage licence conditions for effluent discharge and reuse

·    Managing and funding the long-term capital works program

·    Systematic rehabilitation and renewal of ageing assets

·    Optimising costs of pumping

·    Maintaining skilled staff

 

Levels of Service

 

Council's primary objective with sewerage services is to meet the adopted Levels of Service, which cover the following areas:

·    Service complaints

·    System failures

·    Response times

·    Odour complaints

·    Flow problems

·    Discharge quality

 

Proposed Work Program – Sewer Services

 

When developing Council's Strategic Business Plan for Sewerage Services strategies were identified for achieving the objectives of the Plan and then specific actions were listed for implementation of these strategies.

The notable actions Council proposes to take over the next 10 years include:

·    Nambucca Heads Sewerage Treatment Plant (STP) upgrade  (completed in 2011)

·    Upgrading Nambucca Heads SPS 1,3,6 and 7

·    Upgrading Valla Beach Sewerage Pumping Station (SPS) 5 and 7

·    New SPS 15 and 16 (DCP17) for Macksville

·    Chemical dosing facility for Scotts Head STP

·    Emergency storage capacity augmentation at Macksville SPS 2

·    New sewer mining plants for Valla Urban Growth Area and South Scotts Head

·    Investigation and remedial works to reduce inflow and infiltration

 

 

Capital Works Program

 

The following is a summary of the major sewerage capital works planned for Nambucca Shire Council over the next 10 years. The justification for why they have been planned is also shown below

 

Proposed Capital Work

Year

Justification

 

Nambucca Heads Sewerage Treatment Plant (STP) upgrade

2010 - 2012

Capacity augmentation for improved levels of service and to cater for growth

 

Upgrading Nambucca Heads Sewerage Pumping Station (SPS) 1,3,6 and 7

 

2010 - 2012

Asset renewal and capacity augmentation to cater for growth

 

Upgrading Valla Beach SPS 5 and SPS 7

 

2010 - 2012

Asset renewal and capacity augmentation to cater for growth

 

New SPS 15 and 16 (DCP17) for Macksville

 

2011 - 2012

Servicing new developments

 

Chemical dosing facility for Scotts Head STP

 

2012 - 2013

Capacity augmentation to cate  for growth

 

Emergency storage capacity augmentation at Macksville SPS 2

 

2013

Improved levels of service and regulatory compliance

 

New sewer mining plants for Valla Urban Growth Area and South Scotts Head

 

2016 - 2017

Improved levels of service and water conservation

 


General Purpose Committee - 14 December 2011

Asset Management Plans Summary  

 

 

 

 

 

Placeholder for Attachment 2

 

 

 

Asset Management Plans Summary  

 

 

 

Circularised Document - Consolidtated 10 year work plan (Trim 34475/2011)

 

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