NAMBUCCA SHIRE COUNCIL

 

 

Ordinary Council Meeting - 01 March 2012

 

LATE AGENDA                                                                                        Page

 

           

 

   

9        General Manager Report

9.4     Recommended Deferral of E-Nose Report on Odour Testing - Free Range Piggery, Tewinga

9.5     "Kenwil" Drive?    

 

QUESTIONS WITH NOTICE—Cr Anne Smyth:

 

These questions relate to the sabotage of two small Ivory Curl trees in Bowra Street, Nambucca Heads, during the early hours of 8 February. The trees were situated near the pedestrian crossing adjacent to the Guardian Chemist.  The trees were vandalised by persons unknown to Council and the debris left lying on the footpath.  Council’s Tree Vandalism Policy states:

 

4.1 That when trees on public land are found to be cut down or dying the following steps are to be taken:

 

• Investigate and determine if the tree has been deliberately cut down, damaged by poison or ringbarking.

 

• Deliberate acts are to be further investigated by seeking information by letter from neighbours and those living in close proximity and advising of the reward.

 

• Where possible, vandalised/poisoned vegetation to remain in place until such time as a risk develops from falling limbs.

 

• Replacement planting be undertaken with appropriate species in the event of the tree or vegetation being cut down or removed.

 

• That a sign or banner up to 900 x 2000 mm (size and position to be determined by staff) be placed on the tree or site of the vandalism with the sign to advise of the offer of reward . The banner is to remain in place for a minimum of 12 months from the date it was erected.

 

• That a reward of $5,000 for information leading to a conviction be advertised.”

 

1          What steps has Council taken to investigate the vandalism of the two Ivory Curl trees in Bowra Street, Nambucca Heads?

Council was notified of the vandalism through a business adjacent to the trees as well as a resident.  The matter was reported to the Police and incident number recorded.  Discussions with the business did not provide any evidence of who undertook the act of vandalism and no witnesses came forward.

 

2          Will there be a media release to advertise the reward which Council offers in relation to vandalism of trees on public land and to notify the community that Council does not tolerate such acts of vandalism?

Council advertised the vandalism policy in March, advising of the reward and seeking anyone who may have witnessed or know who conducted the act vandalism on the trees.

 

3          Will Council be replacing the trees?

NO – not at this stage, Council will monitor the re-growth.  The trees were cut with a saw at the base at ground level.  They still have the root system in the ground and staff have only removed the stem and branches that were cut and thrown into the garden bed, The vandalism was inspected and the remaining part of the trunk is still very green beneath the bark and it is anticipated the trees will survive or come back following the damage.  Council will replant new trees to replace the vandalized trees in the event that the trees do not reshoot.

 

4          What is the estimated total cost to Council (including staff time) in responding to and remedying this incidence of tree vandalism?

Clean up and inspection cost estimated under $100.00.  In the event of replanting advance trees the approximated cost is $300-$400.

 

5          Will Council be consulting with the Chamber of Commerce and others in relation to the replacement of the two trees?

Not required at this stage, the Species can reach ten metres, (possibly not suited to pedestrian crossings but they are usually a single trunk species so sight distance would probably not be an issue).  Ivory curl trees have been planted from Beer Parade to Mann Street water towers and the trees.  If the trees require replanting it was intended to replace like for like and therefore no consultation will be undertaken.

 


      


Ordinary Council Meeting                                                                                                     1 March 2012

General Manager's Report

ITEM 9.4      SF1484            010312         Recommended Deferral of E-Nose Report on Odour Testing - Free Range Piggery, Tewinga

 

AUTHOR/ENQUIRIES:     Michael Coulter, General Manager         

 

Summary:

 

The report is short.  A summary is not required.

 

 

Recommendation:

 

1        That item 10.4 be considered in conjunction with this item.

 

2        That consideration of the findings of the odour testing of the free range piggery at Tewinga by E-Nose Pty Ltd be deferred to Council’s meeting on 11 April 2012.

 

 

OPTIONS:

 

Council could consider the report at this meeting, however, arrangements have been made with both the piggery owner and the neighbours for consideration of the report to be deferred.

 

 

DISCUSSION:

 

Council has been contacted by neighbours to the piggery who seek additional time to consider the report on smell testing by E-Nose Pty Ltd.  One of the neighbours is also unavailable to attend this meeting.

 

The piggery owner has been contacted and they also have some difficulty in attending the scheduled meeting on 1 March 2012.

 

As there is no urgency in relation to the consideration of the E-Nose findings it is recommended that the matter be deferred to Council’s meeting on 11 April 2012.

 

 

CONSULTATION:

 

There has been consultation with the neighbours and the piggery owner.

 

 

SUSTAINABILITY ASSESSMENT:

 

Environment

 

There are no implications for the environment in relation to a deferral.

 

Social

 

There are no social implications.

 

Economic

 

There are no economic implications.

 

Risk

 

There are risks if Council proceeded to consider the matter without interested parties being in attendance.

 

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS:

 

Direct and indirect impact on current and future budgets

 

There are no budgetary impacts.

 

Source of fund and any variance to working funds

 

There is no impact on working funds.

 

Attachments:

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Council Meeting                                                                                                     1 March 2012

General Manager's Report

ITEM 9.5      DA2011/122      010312         "Kenwil" Drive?

 

AUTHOR/ENQUIRIES:     Michael Coulter, General Manager         

 

Summary:

 

The owner of an 18 lot subdivision off Rodeo Drive at Wirrimbi (the former Newee Creek sawmill site) proposes to name the internal cul-de-sac road, “Kenwil Drive (preferred) or Kenwil Grove”.

 

The Geographic Names Board believes the proposed name is too closely associated with the property owner, Mr Ken Wilson.  They have a guideline which states that the names of living persons should not be used.  Mr Wilson does not wish to change the name and seeks a determination about the use of “Kenwil Drive”.

 

Another perspective on road naming is that Mr Ken Wilson is the individual who is providing the significant capital required for the subdivision and the person taking all of the risk (and reward).  For the purposes of eliciting a formal response from the community and the Geographic Names Board, Council can propose “Kenwil Drive” as the road name and then consider any objections following the mandatory advertising period.

 

 

Recommendation:

 

1        Council advertise its intention to name the road in the proposed subdivision    DA2011/122, “Kenwil Drive”.

 

2        Following the exhibition period Council consider any objections to the name, “Kenwil Drive” but if there are no written objections the General Manager use delegated authority to grant final approval to the use of the name.

 

 

OPTIONS:

 

The options for road names are almost infinite.  Marketing is normally a consideration in road naming, hence Ocean View Drive, Seaview Street, etc.

 

DISCUSSION:

 

“What’s in a name?  That which we call a rose

By any other name would smell as sweet.”

 

Romeo and Juliet (II, ii, 1-2)

 

Of course as Romeo and Juliet found out there is a lot in a name.  It is not much different when you want to name a road in a new subdivision.

 

Council has a policy on Road and Street Names Selection which was last reviewed in October 2010.

 

Fundamentally, and for obvious reasons, the policy requires unique names to be allocated to all new roads.  Besides the requirement for unique names, the policy sets out other criteria including:

 

·      Being appropriate to the physical, historical or cultural character of the area concerned

·      Thematic names (with a theme) such as flora, nautical etc are acceptable

·      Euphonious names (pleasant sounding) should, as far as possible, be used

·      First and second name contributions should be avoided, with such an honour being reserved for persons of “great eminence” only

·      Unduly long and cumbersome or difficult to pronounce names should be avoided (although if the Kiwi’s can do it?)

·      If considered appropriate, the names of “eminent persons” now deceased may be perpetuated, particularly those of early explorers, settlers, naturalists, etc.

 

On 10 November 2011 Amos and McDonald Surveyors on behalf of property owner, Mr Ken Wilson received development consent for an 18 lot subdivision off Rodeo Drive at Wirrimbi (the former Newee Creek sawmill site).  The subdivision includes an internal cul-de-sac road which Mr Wilson wishes to name, “Kenwil Drive (preferred) or Kenwil Grove”.

 

Because of the similarities of the proposed road name with Mr Wilson’s name, Council staff sought advice from the Geographic Names Board (GNB) who has advised as follows:

 

“The name KENWIL in itself would be acceptable except for the fact that Council has informed us that it has determined that in their opinion this is in fact an attempt to adopt a name that specifically refers to Ken Wilson.  Having been provided with that information and opinion, if the name was officially proposed I (GNB) would raise objection under guideline Propriety 3.1, however, that is only my opinion.  Should Council wish to proceed with the name after objection was raised they could then refer the proposal to the Board who may consider that the name is appropriate and as such overturn my objection.  The ball is really in the Council’s court here as they are the naming authority and are in a position to propose any name they see fit whether they think it meets the guidelines or not and pursue its adoption after initial objection is raised by referring it to the Board or finally to the Minister.  Alternatively Council can reject any name they wish to even if they think it meets the guidelines as they are the naming authority”.

 

There are some Shakespearean policy issues.

 

1.     Is Ken Wilson (the name) also Kenwil (the road)?  The name was acceptable until the GNB became aware of the owner’s name.  So are the names too similar or are they different enough?  What’s in a name?

2.     Is Ken (or Wil) a person of great eminence and who makes that determination?  And which Ken or Wil are we talking about.

3.     Who defines a euphonious name and is it culturally biased?  Is Kenwil more euphonious than Romeo?

 

Based on the advice of the Geographic Names Board, Council staff objected to the proposed road name, “Kenwil Drive”.  The relevant correspondence from Council and Amos and McDonald is attached.  Council’s policy is also attached.

 

Another perspective on road naming is that Mr Ken Wilson is the individual who is providing the significant capital required for the subdivision and the person taking all of the risk (and reward).  For the purposes of eliciting a formal response from the community and the GNB, Council can propose “Kenwil Drive” as the road name and then consider any objections following the mandatory advertising period.

 

 

CONSULTATION:

 

There has been consultation with Mr Ken Wilson, with Councillor Moran, with the Geographic Names Board and with Council staff.  If the proposed name proceeds to advertising there will be consultation with the community and further consultation with the Geographic Names Board as well as emergency services.

 

 

SUSTAINABILITY ASSESSMENT:

 

Environment

 

There are no implications for the environment.

 

Social

 

There are no social implications.

 

Economic

 

There are no economic implications.

 

Risk

 

The major risk for Council is spending more time contemplating the name.  There may be concern the proposal will create a precedent for portmanteau or compound morphemes based around names and thereby open up a “loop hole” in the road naming policy.  If this does occur and if Council is not happy with the precedent it could then explicitly prohibit such practices in its policy.

 

 

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS:

 

Direct and indirect impact on current and future budgets

 

Other than the amount of time spent on the issue, there is no budgetary impact.

 

Source of fund and any variance to working funds

 

There is no impact on working funds.

 

Attachments:

1View

4280/2012 - Submission in relation to road name

 

2View

4470/2012 - Council reply to Amos McDonald

 

3View

25977/2007 - POLICY - Streets Road Naming

 

  


Ordinary Council Meeting - 1 March 2012

"Kenwil" Drive?

 


Ordinary Council Meeting - 1 March 2012

"Kenwil" Drive?

 

Enquiries to:    Keith Williams

Phone No:        02 6568 0237

Our Ref:          DA2011/122

 

 

 

23 February 2012

 

 

 

Michael Rudder

Amos & McDonald Surveyors

PO Box 610

Macksville 2447

 

 

Dear Mr Rudder

 

PROPOSED ROAD NAMING - DA 2011/122 LOT 2 DP 613260 OFF RODEO DRIVE, WIRRIMBI

 

Council refers to your letter dated 21 February 2012 in support of the preferred road name for the subdivision access road related to the abovementioned Development Application.

 

In consideration of your supporting letter and after consultation with the Geographic Names Board (GNB) I wish to advise Council does not consider ‘Kenwil’ is an appropriate name for a public road.  The proposed name neither complies with Council’s policy on street/road naming or the Land and Property Management Authority Guidelines for naming roads.  If the name was submitted to GNB for consideration they would raise objection under guideline Propriety 3.1 as it specifically refers to Ken Wilson, a living person.

 

In essence, the proposal is fraught with failure as set out in the legislation.  We look forward to a further submission in the near future.

 

Yours faithfully

 

 

 

 

Keith Williams

MANAGER TECHNICAL SERVICES

 

KRW:ms

 

 

 


Ordinary Council Meeting - 1 March 2012

"Kenwil" Drive?

 

 

 

 

 

 

NAMBUCCA SHIRE COUNCIL

 POLICY

STREETS/ROADS

NAMING

ROAD AND STREET NAMES SELECTION

 

 

 

Function:  ENGINEERING SERVICES

 

 

Adopted: 19 MARCH 1998     

Last reviewed: 15 JULY 2004 (056)

20 October 2010

 

 

Our Vision

 

Nambucca Valley ~ Living at its best

 

Our Mission Statement

 

‘The Nambucca Valley will value and protect its natural environment, maintain its assets and infrastructure and develop opportunities for its people.’

 

 

1.0     Policy objective

 

To advise of the requirements regarding the naming of roads within the Nambucca Shire Local Government area.

 

The naming of roads is an integral part of the addressing system both rural and urban therefore within a locality, and preferably within a local government area, unique names shall be allocated to all roads used to access address sites.  For uniformity and uniqueness and to facilitate location, significant private roads, rights of way and roads under the control of other authorities should also be named.

 

2.0     Related legislation

 

The relevant Australian StandardAS/NZS 4819:2003

 

3.0       Definitions

 

4.0     Policy statement

 

1        Types of Roads Requiring Naming

 

          There are four types of road that require naming:

 

a        dedicated public road

b        proposed public road (new subdivisions)

c        rights of carriageway servicing multiple lots

d        Crown reserve roads

 


2        Procedures for Naming of Each

 

a        Dedicated Public Road

 

          A dedicated public road to follow the process outlined in the Roads (General) Regulation 2008.

 

          A written application together with a plan of the proposed road/s should be lodged with Council for approval.

 

 

b        Proposed Public Road (New Subdivisions)

 

          Where a new road is proposed in a subdivision of land, the developer or his/her agent must make application to Council for the names to be approved in accordance with road and street names selection criteria.

 

          Prior to the release by Council of the subdivision plan the proposed name shall be advertised in the local press for a minimum of 21 days for objections.

 

 

c        Rights of Carriageway Servicing Multiple Lots

 

          The proposed name shall be advertised in the local press for a minimum of 21 days for objections.

 

 

d        Crown Reserve Roads

 

          The proposed name shall be advertised in the local press for a minimum of 21 days for objections and the road authority (Department of Lands) being requested to comment.

 

 

3        Approval

 

          If no written objections are received then the General Manager has authority to grant final approval to the use of the name.

 

          If objections are received then a report will be prepared for Councils determination.

 

 

4        Road and Street Names Selection Criteria

 

a        These should be appropriate to the physical, historical or cultural character of the area concerned.

 

b        Duplication of names within the urban area is not permitted.  This includes the Naming/Renaming of unnamed roads and also the naming of new roads in a subdivision.  Duplication between towns should also be avoided.

 

c        Proposals for names shall be required to indicate whether the name or names are of Aboriginal origin and such names only being acceptable subject to consultation and concurrence with the relant Local Aboriginal Local Land Council. This includes the three Local Land Councils of Nambucca Heads, Bowraville and Unkya.

 

d        Names with an historical background acceptable.

 

e        Thematic names (with a theme) such as flora, nautical, etc are acceptable.

 

f         Euphonious names (pleasant sounding) should, as far as possible, be used.

 

g        First and Second name contributions should be avoided, with such an honour being reserved for persons of great eminence only.

 

h        Company or commercialised names should not be used.

 

i         Unduly long and cumbersome or difficult to pronounce names should be avoided.

 

j         The changing of long established road names is generally not preferred, except where necessary to avoid ambiguity or duplication.

 

k        Where names have been changed or corrupted by long established local usage, it is not usually advisable to attempt to restore the original form.  That spelling which is sanctioned by general usage should be adopted.

 

l         If considered appropriate, the names of eminent persons now deceased may be perpetuated, particularly those of early explorers, settlers, naturalists, etc.

 

m      The use of hyphens and apostrophes should be avoided.

 

n        The use of the cardinal points of the compass as a prefix or suffix to a road should not be used.

 

o        Names considered likely to give offence, are racist or discriminatory, shall not be used.

 

 

5        Definitions of Road Suffixes

 

          a        Cul-De-Sacs

 

Suffix

Abbrev

Definition

Close

CL

A narrow passageway leading from a Street to a Court

Court

CT

An uncovered area wholly surrounded by buildings or walls

Cove

CE

Small cul-de-sac or court

Glen

GL

A cul-de-sac in a valley of trees

Grove

GR

A roadway ending in a square having a group of trees standing together

Mews

ME

A lane having houses grouped around the end

Place

PL

A short usually narrow street, usually with one prominent building

Plaza

PA

A street bounded on four sides of an area forming a market place or open space

Square

SQ

A street bounding the four sides of an area to be used as open space or a group of buildings

 

 

         


b        Open Ended Streets

 

Suffix

Abbrev

Definition

Arcade

AR

A passage having an arched roof, or any covered passageway, especially one with shops along the sides

Avenue

AVE

A broad passageway planted on each side with trees

Boulevard

BLVD

A wide street or avenue, well paved, usually ornamented with trees and grass plots

Chase

CH

A road leading down to a valley

Circle

Cl

A thoroughfare which forms a circle or part of a circle

Circuit

CC

A road or way enclosing an area

Circus

CS

A circular open place where many trees come together

Crescent

CR

A thoroughfare in the form of a crescent or halfmoon

Drive

DR

A wide thoroughfare allowing a steady flow of traffic without many cross streets

Esplanade

ES

An open, level roadway, often along the seaside, lake or a river

Fairway

FRY

A short open roadway between two streets

Lane

LA

A narrow way between hedges, walls, buildings, etc a narrow country road or city street

Mall

ML

A sheltered walk, promenade or shopping precinct

Parade

PDE

A public promenade or road which has good pedestrian facilities along the sides

Parkway

PWY

A road, street or way through parklands or open grass land area

Path

PT

A way or street not specially constructed usually used for pedestrian traffic

 

 

          b        Open Ended Streets  (continued)

 

Suffix

Abbrev

Definition

Promenade

PRO

Like an avenue with plenty of facilities for the public to take a leisurely walk, a public place for walking

Quays

QS

A road, street or way leading to a landing place alongside or projecting into water for unloading ships, etc

Road

RD

A place where one may ride, an open way or public passage for vehicles, persons and animals, a street forming a means of communication between one place and another, generally applied outside an urban district

Row

RW

A street with a line of professional buildings on either side

Street

ST

A public road in a town or city especially a pave thoroughfare with footpaths and buildings along one or both sides

Terrace

TCE

A road which has the houses on either side raised above the road level

Trail

TRL

A road or way through a wilderness region

Walk

WK

A thoroughfare with restricted vehicle access used mainly by pedestrians

Way

WY

A short access way between two streets

 


6        History

 

Policy was adopted by Council at its meeting on 1 April 1993.

 

The NSW State Government adopted the Roads Act in 1993 and subsequently the Roads (General Regulation) 1994 which identified procedures.

 

Council has also identified procedures for roads other than dedicated public road.

 

Policy adopted by Council at its meeting on 19 March 1998 Roads.

 

(General Regulation) 1994 superseded by Roads (General Regulation) 2008.

 

Clause 4(c) modified on 20 April 2006 to show full name of Muurrbay Language and Cultural Co-Operative Ltd.