NAMBUCCA

SHIRE COUNCIL

 


Ordinary Council Meeting

AGENDA ITEMS

13 October 2016

 

Council has adopted the following Vision and Mission Statements to describe its philosophy and to provide a focus for the principal activities detailed in its Management Plan.

 

Our Vision

Nambucca Valley ~ Living at its best.

 

Our  Mission Statement

 

‘The Nambucca Valley will value and protect its natural environment, maintain its assets and infrastructure and develop opportunities for its people.’

 

Our Values in Delivery

·                Effective leadership

·                Strategic direction

·                Sustainability of infrastructure and assets

·                Community involvement and enhancement through partnerships with Council

·                Enhancement and protection of the environment

·                Maximising business and employment opportunities through promotion of economic development

·                Addressing social and cultural needs of the community through partnerships and provision of facilities and services

·                Actively pursuing resource sharing opportunities

 

Council Meetings:  Overview and Proceedings

 

Council meetings are held on the last Thursday of each month AND on the Thursday two weeks before the Thursday meeting.  Both meetings commence at 5.30 pm.  Meetings are held in the Council Chamber at Council's Administration Centre—44 Princess Street, Macksville (unless otherwise advertised).

 

How can a Member of the Public Speak at a Council Meeting?

 

1        Addressing Council with regard to an item on the meeting agenda:

 

Members of the public are welcome to attend meetings and address the Council.  Registration to speak may be made by telephone or in person before 2.00 pm on a meeting day.  The relevant agenda item will be brought forward at 5.30 pm in agenda order, and dealt with following preliminary business items on the agenda.  Public addresses are limited to five (5) minutes per person with a limit of two people speaking for and two speaking against an item. 

 

2        Public forum address regarding matters not on the meeting agenda:

 

Nambucca Shire Council believes that the opportunity for any person to address the Council in relation to any matter which concerns them is an important demonstration of local democracy and our values.  Accordingly Council allows not more than two (2) members of the public per meeting to address it on matters not listed in the agenda provided the request is received before publication of the agenda and the subject of the address is disclosed and recorded on the agenda.

 

In relation to regulatory or enforcement matters it needs to be understood that the Council has certain legal obligations which will generally prevent the Council from providing an immediate response to any concerns or grievances which may be raised in the public forum.  In particular the Council has to provide procedural fairness and consider all relevant information.  Generally this cannot be done with matters which have come direct to Council via the public forum.  So the fact that the Council may not immediately agree to the representations and seek a report instead should not be taken to indicate disagreement or disinterest.

 

In the public forum speakers should address issues and refrain from making personal attacks or derogatory remarks.  You must treat others with respect at all times.

 

Meeting Agenda

 

These are available Council’s website: www.nambucca.nsw.gov.au


 

NAMBUCCA SHIRE COUNCIL

 

Ordinary Council Meeting - 13 October 2016

 

Acknowledgement of Country            (Mayor)

 

I would like to acknowledge the Gumbaynggirr people who are the Traditional Custodians of this Land.  I would also like to pay respect to the elders both past and present and extend that respect to any Aboriginal People present.

 

AMENDED AGENDA                                                                               Page

 

1        APOLOGIES – Cr David Jones

2        PRAYER Pastor Darryl Spriggs (Presbyterian Church)

3        DISCLOSURE OF INTEREST

4        CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES —

Ordinary Council Meeting - 29 September 2016............................................................................. 7

5        NOTICES OF MOTION  

6        PUBLIC FORUM

i         Mr Tony Fuller - No footpath - Conen Street Bowraville

ii        Mr Tony Fuller - Heavy traffic intersection Conen/William Sts

iii       Ms Leona Bush - Tree planting in Main Street B/V

iv       Ms Marion Syratt – Plan for Town of Bowraville

DELEGATIONS

9.7     Lower Buckrabendinni Road - Requests to Extend Road Seal........................................... 72

i         Mr Jim Cameron – User of Lower Buckrabendinni Road

ii        Mr Terry Baldwin – User of Lower Buckrabendinni Road

 

7        ASKING OF QUESTIONS (SUGGESTION) WITH NOTICE   

From Ms Maureen Parkyns:  I have a suggestion that I would like to make in regards to the roadside and street rubbish bins.

When walking down the street in Bowraville you are unable to put anything into the street rubbish bins as they are always full.  This is because residence are using these bins to place all their household rubbish instead of taking it to the tip.  My suggestion to fix this problem around the Nambucca Valley is:

If residents that do not have a garbage service and pay an extra (lets say) $80 a year on their rates and Council issue them with a card that will give them free access to the tip for the year, they can take there rubbish to the tip for free instead of paying the fee to go into the tip every time which can be quite pricey if you only have a couple of bags of rubbish each time. 

This way the rubbish would not be put into these small roadside bins and Council would not have to empty them as often.  This system has worked very efficiently in Cooma for many years. 

8        QUESTIONS FOR CLOSED MEETING WHERE DUE NOTICE HAS BEEN RECEIVED

9        General Manager Report

9.1     Election of Deputy Mayor 2016-2017............................................................................... 14

9.2     Committees of Management - Facilities and Events.......................................................... 18

9.3     Council Advisory Committees......................................................................................... 21

9.4     Outstanding Actions and Reports.................................................................................... 41

9.5     Outstanding Water Account............................................................................................. 47

9.6     Joint Organisations - Getting the boundaries right............................................................ 60

9.7     Lower Buckrabendinni Road - Requests to Extend Road Seal—DELEGATIONS ............... 72

9.8     Visitor Information Centre Leasing and Tourism Update.................................................... 92

9.9     Bowraville Connections, Stage 1 Community Recreation and Sports Precinct................... 100

9.10   Australian White Ibis Management Plan - Dawkins Park Macksville.................................. 106

9.11   Development Applications greater than 12 months or where submissions received – 21 September to 6 October 2016................................................................................................................ 151

9.12   Provision of Insurance Brokerage Services.................................................................... 154

9.13   Community Stragetic Plan Review and Corporate Performance Reporting........................ 156


 

 

10      Assistant General Manager Corporate Services Report

10.1   Investment Report To 31 July 2016 ............................................................................... 159

10.2   Schedule of Council Public Meetings............................................................................. 164

10.3   Argents Hill Hall Committee of Management - Minutes of Annual General Meeting – 12 September 2016.................................................................................................................................... 165

10.4   Warrell Creek Hall Committee of Management AGM - 2 September 2015 - Minutes........... 167

10.5   Nambucca District Historical Society Committee of Management - Minutes of Annual General Meeting - 20 September 2016....................................................................................................... 174

10.6   Nambucca Community and Arts Centre Committee of Management Annual General Meeting - 19 August 2016............................................................................................................................. 181

 

11      Assistant General Manager Engineering Services Report

11.1   Waste Disposal Vouchers............................................................................................. 189    

12      General Manager's Summary of Items to be Discussed in Closed Meeting

12.1   Report on Visitor Information Centre Bookings

It is recommended that the Council resolve into closed session with the press and public excluded to allow consideration of this item, as provided for under Section 10A(2) (d) of the Local Government Act, 1993, on the grounds that the report contains commercial information of a confidential nature that would, if disclosed (i) prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied it; or (ii) confer a commercial advantage on a competitor of the Council; or (iii) reveal a trade secret.

  

            a      Questions raised by Councillors at 8 above

 

       i         MOTION TO CLOSE THE MEETING

       ii        PUBLIC VERBAL REPRESENTATIONS REGARDING PROPOSAL

     TO CLOSE

       iii       CONSIDERATION OF PUBLIC REPRESENTATIONS

                   iv       DEAL WITH MOTION TO CLOSE THE MEETING

13      MEETING CLOSED TO THE PUBLIC

14      REVERT TO OPEN MEETING FOR DECISIONS IN RELATION TO ITEMS DISCUSSED IN CLOSED MEETING.


NAMBUCCA SHIRE COUNCIL

 

Description: nambucca valley nsc

 

DISCLOSURE OF INTEREST AT MEETINGS

 

 

Name of Meeting:

 

Meeting Date:

 

Item/Report Number:

 

Item/Report Title:

 

 

 

I

 

declare the following interest:

          (name)

 

 

 

 

Pecuniary – must leave chamber, take no part in discussion and voting.

 

 

 

Non Pecuniary – Significant Conflict – Recommended that Councillor/Member leaves chamber, takes no part in discussion or voting.

 

 

Non-Pecuniary – Less Significant Conflict – Councillor/Member may choose to remain in Chamber and participate in discussion and voting.

 

For the reason that

 

 

 

 

 

 

Signed

 

Date

 

 

 

 

 

Council’s Email Address – council@nambucca.nsw.gov.au

 

Council’s Facsimile Number – (02) 6568 2201

 

(Instructions and definitions are provided on the next page).

 


Definitions

 

(Local Government Act and Code of Conduct)

 

 

Pecuniary – An interest that a person has in a matter because of a reasonable likelihood or expectation of appreciable financial gain or loss to the person or another person with whom the person is associated.

(Local Government Act, 1993 section 442 and 443)

 

A Councillor or other member of a Council Committee who is present at a meeting and has a pecuniary interest in any matter which is being considered must disclose the nature of that interest to the meeting as soon as practicable.

 

The Council or other member must not take part in the consideration or discussion on the matter and must not vote on any question relating to that matter. (Section 451).

 

 

Non-pecuniary – A private or personal interest the council official has that does not amount to a pecuniary interest as defined in the Act (for example; a friendship, membership of an association, society or trade union or involvement or interest in an activity and may include an interest of a financial nature).

 

If you have declared a non-pecuniary conflict of interest you have a broad range of options for managing the conflict.  The option you choose will depend on an assessment of the circumstances of the matter, the nature of your interest and the significance of the issue being dealt with.  You must deal with a non-pecuniary conflict of interest in at least one of these ways.

 

·         It may be appropriate that no action is taken where the potential for conflict is minimal.  However, council officials should consider providing an explanation of why they consider a conflict does not exist.

·         Limit involvement if practical (for example, participate in discussion but not in decision making or visa-versa).  Care needs to be taken when exercising this option.

·         Remove the source of the conflict (for example, relinquishing or divesting the personal interest that creates the conflict or reallocating the conflicting duties to another officer).

·         Have no involvement by absenting yourself from and not taking part in any debate or voting on the issue as if the provisions in section 451(2) of the Act apply (particularly if you have a significant non-pecuniary conflict of interest).

 


NAMBUCCA SHIRE COUNCIL

Ordinary Council Meeting

MINUTES OF THE Ordinary Council Meeting HELD ON 29 September 2016

The following document is the minutes of the Ordinary Council meeting held 29 September 2016.  These minutes are subject to confirmation as to their accuracy at the next meeting to be held on Thursday 13 October 2016 and therefore subject to change.  Please refer to the minutes of 13 October 2016 for confirmation.

 

 

PRESENT

 

Cr Rhonda Hoban (Mayor)

Cr John Ainsworth

Cr Martin Ballangarry OAM

Cr Brian Finlayson

Cr Susan Jenvey

Cr David Jones

Cr Janine Reed

Cr Anne Smyth

Cr John Wilson

 

 

 

ALSO PRESENT

 

Michael Coulter (General Manager)

Scott Norman (AGM Corporate Services)

Paul Gallagher (AGM Engineering Services)

Monika Schuhmacher (Minute Secretary)

 

 

PRESENTATION

 

5.30 pm       The Hon Melinda Pavey MP presented outgoing Councillors (Councillors Paula Flack, Kim MacDonald and Elaine South) with a token of appreciation for their contribution to Local Government in the Nambucca Shire.

 

 

PRAYER

 

Captain Steve Dorman from The Salvation Army offered a prayer on behalf of the Nambucca Minister's Association.

 

 

378/16 379/16 Resolved:       (Ainsworth/Ballangarry)

 

That Item 9.1 be brought forward.

 

 

 

ITEM 9.1      SF42                  290916      Oath or Affirmation of Office

380/16 RESOLVED:        (Ainsworth/Ballangarry)

 

This is a procedural requirement to be conducted at the commencement of the meeting and is not a matter requiring a vote by the Council.

 

The following Councillors took the Oath or Affirmation:

 

OATH

AFFIRMATION

Mayor, Cr Rhonda Hoban

Cr Brian Finlayson

Cr John Ainsworth

Cr Susan Jenvey

Cr Martin Ballangarry OAM

Cr Anne Smyth

Cr David Jones

 

Cr Janine Reed

 

Cr John Wilson

 

 

 


 

 

DISCLOSURE OF INTEREST

 

There were no disclosures of interest.

 

 

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES - Ordinary Council Meeting 25 August 2016

 

RECOMMENDATION:

 

That the minutes of the Ordinary Council Meeting of 25 August 2016 be confirmed.

 

 

 

DELEGATIONS

 

RESOLVED:

 

The following people from IGA Bowraville were available for questions in relation to the Item:

 

9.10      Modification to DA2016/097—(available for questions)............................................................... 8

                   Ms Brooke Garlinge -- Mr Bruce Parker -- Mr Jeffrey Brownhill

 

 

ITEM 9.10    DA2016/097        290916      Modification to DA2016/097 (Trolley Bay)

Motion:      (Hoban/Reed)

 

1        That Council as the consent authority, pursuant to Section 96 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979, approve the application to modify development consent DA2016/097 subject to the proposed draft condition in attachment 6 (to the report) except for the deletion of the third dot point in condition number 4.

 

2        That Council as the property owner provide the IGA supermarket with a one year licence to occupy its footpath at a rental of $200 per annum and that ongoing occupation of the footpath for the purpose of a trolley bay be subject to a renewal of the licence and a review of the applicable rental.  All costs associated with the preparation and renewal of the licence to be borne by the supermarket owner.

 

Amendment:       (Smyth/Ballangarry)

 

That this item be deferred so that Council may undertake an onsite inspection.

 

The amendment was LOST.

 

381/16 Resolved:        (Hoban/Reed)

 

1        That Council as the consent authority, pursuant to Section 96 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979, approve the application to modify development consent DA2016/097 subject to the proposed draft condition in attachment 6 (to the report) except for the deletion of the third dot point in condition number 4.

 

2        That Council as the property owner provide the IGA supermarket with a one year licence to occupy its footpath at a rental of $200 per annum and that ongoing occupation of the footpath for the purpose of a trolley bay be subject to a renewal of the licence and a review of the applicable rental.  All costs associated with the preparation and renewal of the licence to be borne by the supermarket owner.

 

For the motion:                Councillors Hoban, Jones, Reed, Ainsworth, Finlayson, Wilson  (Total 6)

Against the motion:         Councillors Smyth, Jenvey, Ballangarry         (Total 3)

 

 

 

ASKING OF QUESTIONS WITH NOTICE

 

There were no questions with notice.

 

 

QUESTIONS FOR CLOSED MEETING WHERE DUE NOTICE HAS BEEN RECEIVED

 

There were no questions for Closed Meeting where due notice has been received.

 

 

General Manager Report

 

ITEM 9.2      SF256                290916      Proposed Councillor Training and Induction

382/16 RESOLVED:        (Flack/Ainsworth)

That the information concerning the proposed training and induction for the new Council be received.

 

383/16 Resolved:        (Smyth/Ainsworth)

 

That any suggestions regarding the addition of other committees be brought to the General Manager in time to be included in the Agenda for the next Council meeting on 13 October 2016.

 

 

 

ITEM 9.3      SF42                  290916      "Hit the Ground Running" Councillor Workshops

384/16 RESOLVED:        (Ainsworth/Finlayson)

 

That any Councillors interested in attending the “Hit the Ground Running” workshop at Coffs Harbour on Wednesday 16 November 2016 advise the General Manager so their attendance can be registered.

 

 

 

ITEM 9.4      SF959                290916      Outstanding Actions and Reports

385/16 RESOLVED:        (Finlayson/Ainsworth)

 

That the list of outstanding actions and reports be noted and received for information by Council.

 

 

 

ITEM 9.5      SF591                290916      NSW Emergency Services Property Levy

386/16 RESOLVED:        (Ainsworth/Finlayson)

 

That the information concerning the NSW Emergency Services Property Levy which is scheduled to commence on 1 July 2017 be received.

 

 

 

387/16 Resolved:        (Ainsworth/Ballangarry)

 

That Item 10.3 be brought forward as the Grants Officer was in the Gallery to answer questions from Councillors.

 

 

ITEM 10.3    SF1120              290916      Grant Application Status Report

388/16 RESOLVED:        (Finlayson/Ainsworth)

 

That Council receive the list of grant applications to 9 September 2016 and the list of current grant funding available from Council’s new Grants Calendar.

 

 

ITEM 9.6      SF42                  290916      Local Government Amendment (Governance and Planning) Act

389/16 RESOLVED:        (Finlayson/Reed)

 

That the information concerning the amendments to the Local Government Act 1993 be received.

 

 

 

ITEM 9.7      PRF14                290916      Future of Brook Park, Nambucca Heads

Motion:      (Finlayson/Ainsworth)

 

That the Park be closed and the land be reclassified from community land to operational land and be sold for residential purposes with the funds being used to develop another park.

 

Amendment:       (Smyth/Jenvey)

 

That this item be deferred in order for Council to undertake a site inspection and that adjacent residents of Brook Park be notified of the site inspection.

 

The amendment was carried and it became the motion and it was:

 

390/16 Resolved:        (Smyth/Jenvey)

 

That this item be deferred in order for Council to undertake a site inspection and that adjacent residents of Brook Park be notified of the site inspection.

 

 

 


ITEM 9.8      SF827                290916      Local Government Grants Commission Visit

391/16 RESOLVED:        (Ainsworth/Smyth)

 

1        That the information concerning presentations by and to the Local Government Grants Commission at 9.00am on Thursday 3 November 2016 be received.

 

2        That the additional road and bridge length on the existing Pacific Highway proposed to be handed over to Council be forwarded to the Grants Commission so they may be able to advise on what additional funding the Council will receive.

 

 

 

ITEM 9.9      SF1541              290916      Horticulture Land Use Regulation

Motion:      (Finlayson/Ainsworth)     

 

That there be no alterations to the NLEP 2010 with the exception of land zoned R5 where the plan should be amended to allow horticulture with consent.    WITHDRAWN

 

392/16 RESOLVED:        (Ainsworth/Reed)

 

That Council staff report the intended exempt development controls to be implemented into Schedule 2 of the Nambucca Local Environmental Plan 2010 to Council for R5 zoned land only.

 

 

For the motion:               Councillors Hoban, Jones, Reed, Ainsworth, Finlayson, Smyth and Wilson                                           (Total 7)

Against the motion:         Councillors Ballangarry and Jenvey     (Total 2)

 

 

 

 

Item 9.10 was dealt with under Delegations.

 

 

 


ITEM 9.11    SF2172              290916      Minutes of the Nambucca Shire Council Access Committee meeting held 23 August 2016

393/16 RESOLVED:        (Smyth/Ballangarry)

 

1        That Council note the application for the 2017 Seniors Week luncheon. 

 

2        That Council note the Committee’s concerns regarding a proposal to house shopping trolleys on the Council footpath outside the Bowraville IGA.

 

3        That Council endorse the minutes of the Nambucca Shire Council Access Committee meeting held 26 July 2016.

 

394/16 Resolved:        (Hoban/Reed)

 

That Cr Smyth be thanked for her submission to the Legislative Assembly Committee on Community Services inquiry into the access to transport for seniors and disadvantaged people in rural and regional NSW on behalf of the Access Committee.

 

 

 

ITEM 9.12    SF1958              290916      Nambucca and Deep Creek Flood Risk Management Study and Plan

395/16 RESOLVED:        (Ainsworth/Finlayson)

 

1        The Council note the draft Flood Risk Management Study and Plan has been prepared by WMA water.

 

2        Following consideration of the report by Council’s Estuary Committee, there be a further report to Council recommending the study be exhibited.

 

 

 

ITEM 9.13    SF2173              290916      Development Applications greater than 12 months or where submissions received - 18 August to 20 September 2016

396/16 RESOLVED:        (Ainsworth/Ballangarry)

 

That the information be noted by Council.

 

 

 

ITEM 9.14    SF1148              290916      Council Ranger's Report August 2016

397/16 RESOLVED:        (Finlayson/Ainsworth)

 

That Council’s Ranger’s report for August 2016 be received and noted by Council.

 

 

 

ITEM 9.15    SF2025              290916      Joint Organisations - Getting the Boundaries Right

398/16 RESOLVED:        (Finlayson/Reed)

 

1        There be a further report to Council’s meeting on 13 October 2016 concerning a submission in response to the discussion paper by the Office of Local Government – “Getting the Boundaries Right”.

 

2        Councillors provide any feedback to the General Manager on their views so they may be included as considerations and options for the report to the meeting on 13 October 2016.

 

 

 

ITEM 9.16    SF1067              290916      Asylum Seekers - Safe Haven Enterprise Visa Scheme

399/16 RESOLVED:        (Ainsworth/Reed)

 

That Council respond saying that at this time there are other local government areas better placed to accommodate refugees with special needs.

 

 

 

ITEM 9.17    SF2173              290916      2016 August - Development and Complying Development Applications Received

400/16 RESOLVED:        (Finlayson/Ainsworth)

 

That the Development Applications and Complying Development Applications received in August 2016 be received for information.

 

 

 

ITEM 9.18    SF2173              290916      2016 August - Approved Construction and Complying Development Certificates

401/16 RESOLVED:        (Ainsworth/Finlayson)

 

That the Construction and Complying Development Certificates approved for August 2016 be noted and received for information by Council.

 

 

 

Assistant General Manager Corporate Services Report

 

ITEM 10.1    SF770                290916      Review of the Local Government Rating System - Draft Submission

402/16 RESOLVED:        (Ainsworth/Finlayson)

 

That Council make a submission to IPART on the draft review of the Local Government Rating System.

 

 

 

ITEM 10.2    SF2230              290916      Investment Report To 31 July 2016

403/16 RESOLVED:        (Finlayson/Ainsworth)

 

That the Accountants’ Report on Investments placed to 31 August 2016 be noted.

 

 

Item 10.3 was dealt with earlier in the meeting.

 

 

 

ITEM 10.4    SF251                290916      Schedule of Council Public Meetings

404/16 RESOLVED:        (Ainsworth/Reed)

 

That the schedule of dates for public Council meetings be noted and received for information by Council and that it be noted that Council's meeting on 15 December 2016 will be held at the Utungun Community Hall.

 

 

 

ITEM 10.5    SF308                290916      Donnelly-Welsh Playing Fields Committee of Management - Annual General Meeting - 1 August 2016 - Minutes

405/16 RESOLVED:        (Finlayson/Ainsworth)

 

That Council endorse the minutes of the Committee of Management of the Donnelly-Welsh Playing Fields Annual General Meeting which was held on 1 August 2016 and that Council thank the outgoing Committee for their work in 2015/2016.

 

 

 

Assistant General Manager Engineering Services Report

 

ITEM 11.1    SF1031              290916      Draft Proposed Pressure Sewerage Policy

406/16 RESOLVED:        (Hoban/Finlayson)

 

1        That Council place the Draft Pressure Sewerage Policy on public exhibition for the required period of 28 days.

 

2        That Council address any reasonable concerns raised by the submissions prior to finalising the document for the endorsement of Council.

 

3        That Council receive a further report at the completion of the exhibition period with a view to endorsing the policy document.

 

4        That Council endorse the Home Owners' Manual for issue to property owners and residents whose properties will be serviced by a pressure sewerage system.

 

5        That Council provide a rebate on the sewerage access charge for properties with pressure sewerage as compensation for the power consumed in operating the onsite pump.

 

 

   

 

CLOSURE

 

There being no further business the Mayor then closed the meeting the time being 7.43 pm. 

 

Confirmed and signed by the Mayor on 13 October 2016

 

 

 

 

CR RHONDA HOBAN

MAYOR

(CHAIRPERSON)

 

 

          


Ordinary Council Meeting                                                                                               13 October 2016

General Manager's Report

ITEM 9.1      SF830              131016         Election of Deputy Mayor 2016-2017

 

AUTHOR/ENQUIRIES:    Michael Coulter, General Manager         

 

Summary:

 

It is a requirement under the Local Government (Elections) Regulations 1998, Clause 124 that the annual election of a Deputy Mayor is to be in accordance with Schedule 3 of that Regulation.

 

 

Recommendation:

 

1        That the election of a Deputy Mayor proceed by ordinary (secret) ballot if a ballot is required.

 

2        That nominations be invited and received by the General Manager as returning Officer for the election of Deputy Mayor.

 

3        That the election of Deputy Mayor proceeds.

 

4        That following the election, the Mayor declares Cr……..elected as Deputy Mayor for the term of office expiring in September 2017. 

 

5        That the Division of Local Government be advised of the outcome of the election and Council’s website be updated.

 

 

OPTIONS:

 

There are options as to the method of election being open voting (show of hands); ordinary (secret) ballot or a preferential (secret) ballot.

 

 

DISCUSSION:

 

Schedule 3 provides that the General Manager is the Returning Officer, that nominations may be without notice but nominations must be in writing by two or more Councillors (one of whom may be the nominee) and is not valid unless the nominee has indicated consent to the nomination in writing and the nomination is delivered or sent to the Returning Officer.

 

Whilst a nomination form is included in this report, I appreciate that Councillors may not be able to print same.  For this reason I will have printed copies of the form available before the Council meeting.  I have also put a printed copy of the form in Councillors’ trays.

 

If only one Councillor is nominated, that Councillor is elected.  Where more than one nomination is received the Council must resolve whether the election is to proceed by preferential ballot, ordinary ballot or open voting.  (Preferential ballot and ordinary ballot are in fact secret ballots while open voting is a show of hands).

 

Ordinary Ballot or Open Voting

 

The process for an ordinary ballot or open voting is as follows:

 

·           Where there are only two candidates, the candidate with the highest number of votes is elected, and if they are tied the one to be elected is the one chosen by lot.

 

·           Where there are three or more candidates, the one with the lowest number of votes is excluded.

 

·           If three or more candidates then remain, a further vote is taken and the one with the lowest number of votes from that further vote is excluded.

 

·           If after that three or more candidates still remain the procedure is to be repeated until only two candidates remain.

 

Where there are only two candidates (remaining) with equal votes the one elected is the one chosen by lot.  By contrast, where there are three or more candidates and some are tied for lowest, the one excluded is the one chosen by lot.

 

If the method of voting resolved by Council is by ordinary ballot or open voting the Part 2 of the Regulations apply (paragraph 20-2360 and onwards).

 

Preferential Ballot

 

The ballot papers are to contain the names of all the candidates.  The councillors are to mark their votes by placing the numbers “1”, “2”, and so on against the various names to indicate their order of preference for all the candidates.

 

If the candidate has an absolute majority of first preference votes, the candidate is elected.  If not the candidate with the lowest number of first preference votes is excluded and the votes on the unexhausted ballot papers counted to him or her are transferred to the candidates with the second preferences on those ballot papers.  A candidate who then has an absolute majority of votes is elected, but if no candidate then has an absolute majority of votes, the process is repeated until one candidate has received an absolute majority of votes.

 

For tied candidates, if there are 2 candidates and the numbers of votes cast for each are equal, the candidate whose name is first chosen by lot is taken to be elected.  If there are 3 or more candidates remaining in the election and the numbers of votes cast for 2 or more candidates are equal and those candidates are the ones with the lowest number of votes, then the candidates whose name is first chosen by lot is taken to have the lowest number of votes and is excluded.

 

Choosing by lot

 

The names of the candidates who have equal numbers of votes are written on similar slips of paper by the returning officer, the slips are folded by the returning officer so as to prevent the names being seen, the slips are mixed and one is drawn at random by the returning officer and the candidate whose name is on the drawn slip is chosen.

 

 

CONSULTATION:

 

There has been no consultation.

 

 

SUSTAINABILITY ASSESSMENT:

 

Environment

 

There are no environmental implications.

 

Social

 

There are no social implications.

 

Economic

 

There are no economic implications.

 

Risk

 

There are no risk implications.

 

 

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS:

 

Direct and indirect impact on current and future budgets

 

There are no financial implications for Council.

 

Source of fund and any variance to working funds

 

There are no financial implications for Council.

 

Service level changes and resourcing/staff implications

 

There are no service level or staffing implications.

 


NAMBUCCA SHIRE COUNCIL

 

 

 

 

NOMINATION

 

ELECTION OF DEPUTY MAYOR

 

 13 OCTOBER 2016

 

PRINT IN CAPITALS

NAME OF COUNCILLORS

NOMINATED FOR ELECTION:           ………………………………………………….

 

 

 

SIGNATURE OF COUNCILLORS

CONSENTING TO NOMINATION:      …………………………………………………..

 

 

 

SIGNATURE OF COUNCILLOR

ENDORSING THE NOMINATION:      ………………………………………………….

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MICHAEL COULTER

GENERAL MANAGER

AND

RETURNING OFFICER

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Attachments:

There are no attachments for this report.  


Ordinary Council Meeting                                                                                               13 October 2016

General Manager

ITEM 9.2      SF842              131016         Committees of Management - Facilities and Events

 

AUTHOR/ENQUIRIES:    Michael Coulter, General Manager         

 

Summary:

 

Council has many Section 355 Committees managing Council facilities and also staging community events.  At Council’s meeting on 19 March 2009 it was resolved that a roster be developed for the attendance of either Councillors or the General Manager at the Annual General Meeting (AGM) of each facility or event Committee of Management.

 

 

Recommendation:

 

That Council adopt the roster for attendance at the Annual General Meetings for Section 355 Committees.

 

 

 

DISCUSSION:

 

Councillors are, by virtue of their office (ex officio) entitled to attend all meetings of Committees of Council.

 

However, although Councillors may attend in an ex officio capacity they do not necessarily have a right to vote.  That right to vote attaches to the appointment as a representative or member or delegate as appropriate.

 

At Council’s meeting on 19 March 2009 it was resolved that a roster be developed for the attendance of either Councillors or the General Manager at the AGM of each facility or event Committee of Management. 

 

The involvement of a Council representative in the AGM’s is valued by the Committees as it links them to Council’s administration and provides an opportunity to respond to any particular operational questions or problems they might have.

 

A suggested roster for the Council’s consideration is shown in the following table.  Whilst Council staff endeavour to ensure that Section 355 Committees provide adequate notice of their AGM’s, if a rostered person is unable to attend an AGM for whatever reason, then that person should organise a replacement.

 

 

COMMITTEE OF MANAGEMENT

ROSTER FOR AGM ATTENDANCE

Argents Hill Hall

Cr Susan Jenvey

Australia Day

General Manager

Bowraville Sports Ground (Hennessy Tape Oval)    

Cr Martin Ballangarry OAM

Burrapine Public Hall

General Manager

Coronation Park

Cr Anne Smyth

Crosswinds Wetland Nature Reserve

Cr Janine Reed

Donnelly-Welsh Playing Fields

Cr John Ainsworth

EJ Biffin Playing

Cr Rhonda Hoban

Eungai District Memorial Hall

General Manager

Gordon Park Rainforest

Cr Anne Smyth

Gordon Park Tennis Centre

Cr Anne Smyth

Grants Hall

Cr Martin Ballangarry OAM

Macksville Gift

Cr Janine Reed

Macksville Park and Sports

AGM Engineering Services

Macksville Tennis Courts

AGM Engineering Services

Mary Boulton Pioneer Cottage and Museum

Cr John Ainsworth

Missabotti Community Centre

Cr Susan Jenvey

Nambucca District Band

Cr Martin Ballangarry OAM

Nambucca District Historical Society & Museum

Cr Anne Smyth

Nambucca Community and Arts Centre

(formerly Nambucca Entertainment Centre)

Cr John Wilson

Nambucca Valley Netball Courts

General Manager

North Macksville Playing Fields & Soccer Club

General Manager

Scotts Head Events Committee

Assistant General Manager Corporate Services

Scotts Head Sports Field

Assistant General Manager Corporate Services

Scotts Head Tennis Courts

Assistant General Manager Corporate Services

South Arm Hall

Cr Martin Ballangarry OAM

Talarm Hall and Welsh Pioneer Park

Cr Brian Finlayson

Taylors Arm Hall

Cr David Jones

Taylors Arm Sports Reserve

Cr David Jones

Tewinga Community Centre

Cr John Wilson

Unkya Reserve

General Manager

Utungun Community Hall

Cr Janine Reed

Valla Beach Tennis Club

Cr Rhonda Hoban

Valla Beach Community Association

Cr Susan Jenvey

Valla Public Hall

Cr Rhonda Hoban

Warrell Creek Public Hall

General Manager

 

 

CONSULTATION:

 

Nil

 

SUSTAINABILITY ASSESSMENT:

 

Environment

 

This report has no impact on the environment.

 

Social

 

This report has no social impacts.

 

Economic

 

This report has no economic impacts.

 

Risk

 

There are no risks associated with this report.

 

 

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS:

 

Direct and indirect impact on current and future budgets

 

There are no direct or indirect financial impacts.

 

Source of fund and any variance to working funds

 

There are no variances to working funds.

 

Service level changes and resourcing/staff implications

 

There are no changes to service levels or staffing implications.

 

Attachments:

There are no attachments for this report.  


Ordinary Council Meeting                                                                                               13 October 2016

General Manager's Report

ITEM 9.3      SF842              131016         Council Advisory Committees

 

AUTHOR/ENQUIRIES:    Michael Coulter, General Manager         

 

Summary:

 

The new council needs to formally review and appoint advisory committees.  The report lists the committees which operated over the previous term of Council and recommends their continuation with new councillors being nominated to replace retiring councillors as appropriate.

 

 

Recommendation:

 

1   That Council adopt the following list of Advisory Committees with new councillors being nominated to replace retiring councillors as appropriate.

 

2   That Council establish a Clean Energy Committee and seek feedback from Bellingen Shire Council as to their interest in a joint committee.  Further, following the receipt of advice from Bellingen Shire Council that Council staff report back to Council on the composition of the committee, appropriate terms of reference, meeting frequency etc.

 

3   That Council reconstitute the Economic Directions Committee with Council staff to report back to Council on the composition of the committee, appropriate terms of reference, meeting frequency etc.

 

 

OPTIONS:

 

The Council largely has discretion as to the committee structure it uses and the delegation of authority which it provides to those committees.  A number of committees and their functions such as Audit, Risk and Improvement as well as the Local Traffic Committee are outside Council’s control.

 

There are a number of factors to be considered in determining the value or cost effectiveness of Advisory Committees.  Without limiting the range of considerations, the following should be considered in the establishment of any Committee.

 

·      Whether or not the subject matter is important and complex, requiring more detailed scrutiny and consideration than could be afforded through Council’s normal twice monthly meetings.

·      Whether or not Council’s consideration of the matter could be improved by having members of the public or representatives of government departments with particular knowledge or expertise providing advice in a process separate to Council’s normal twice monthly meetings.

·      Whether or not the number and/or timing of decisions which need to be made in relation to a matter will require the delegation of authority to a Committee instead of decisions being made by Council at its normal twice monthly meetings.

·      Whether or not the consultative opportunities provided by a Committee may improve public participation in decision making over and above what could be achieved through Council’s normal processes for community engagement.

 

 

DISCUSSION:

 

A brief summary of Council’s Committees which have operated over the previous term are as follows:

 

Committee

Previous Councillors

Terms of Reference

Access Committee

Cr South

Cr Smyth

To develop and implement strategies which aim to ensure that the Nambucca Shire becomes an accessible community to all people, regardless of their abilities/ disabilities.

 

Arts Mid North Coast

 

Cr Flack

This is not a committee of council but rather a regional arts body which receives funding from Councils and the State Government and whose mission is to foster and support the creative arts on the Mid North Coast.

 

Audit, Risk & Improvement Committee

One Councillor (can no longer be the Mayor)

Mr Peter Lawry

Bellingen Shire Council Finance Manager

Committee must review the following aspects of the Council’s operations: compliance, risk management; fraud control; financial management; governance; implementation of strategic plan, delivery program and strategies; service reviews; collection of performance measurement data by the Council; any other matters prescribed by regulation.

 

Estuary & Coastline Management Committee

Cr Ainsworth (Chair)

Cr Flack

Cr Morrison

(plus government department & community reps)

Provide overall guidance for future management of Nambucca LGA’s river estuaries, coastal floodplains, coastal zone and flood risk in accordance with the NSW Coastal Policy, Flood Policy, State Rivers and Estuary Policy and NSW Wetlands Policy.

 

Oversee various investigations and studies that are required to evaluate flood risk, coastal zone and estuarine management options.

 

Assist Council in the preparation of Flood, Estuary and Coastal Zone Management Plans for all Nambucca Shire’s estuaries and coasts in accordance with the State Government Flood, Coast and Estuary Management Manuals.

 

Explore opportunities and assist Council in obtaining funding for works and projects that are identified as scheduled actions in Flood, Estuary and/or Coastal Management Plans; deemed necessary to effect improved management of coastal and estuary systems prior to the development of such plans.

 

Act as an advisory body to Council on coastal and estuary issues.

 

Provide a forum for open discussion, debate and education on coast, flood and estuary issues.

 

Provide linkages to other natural resource management committees, the catchment management board and community/stakeholder groups.

 

General Manager’s Performance Review Committee

 

All Councillors

The Office of Local Government recommended that a Committee be appointed to review the General Manager’s performance.  Whilst Council has a Committee, the practice has been for the twice yearly review of the General Manager’s performance to be undertaken by the Council at a Council meeting.

 

Land Development Committee

 

All Councillors

The Council has an extensive property portfolio that comprises both operational and community land.  The portfolio requires strategic management.  The Committee has met infrequently, mainly because many property matters have been reported direct to Council meetings.

 

Local Traffic Committee

(please note that despite the name, the Committee is not a committee of Council but rather the RMS)

One Council rep – currently the Manager Technical Services

NSW Police

RMS

Local State Member of their nominee (Mr Barry Reed)

 

Primarily a technical review committee which is required to advise the Council on matters referred to it (as per the guide to the delegation to councils for the regulation of traffic). 

Lower North Coast Bushfire Management Committee

 

Cr Ainsworth

The Committee is responsible for the Lower North Coast Bushfire Risk Management Plan preparation and review for Kempsey and Nambucca LGA’s.  It meets quarterly.

 

Nambucca Bushfire Management Committee

 

Cr Ainsworth

 

The Committee is primarily concerned with planning for hazard reduction and meets about quarterly.

Nambucca Emergency Operations Centre Committee of Management

 

Cr Ainsworth

Cr Morrison

This Committee meets once a year to review the management arrangements and floor space of the NEOC complex which is located at the rear of the Mary Boulton Cottage Museum (rear of Works Depot).

 

Nambucca Entertainment Centre

 

Cr Smyth

Cr Ballangarry OAM

The name of the entertainment centre has now been changed to the, “Nambucca Community and Arts Centre” which more accurately reflects its functions.  Council has exercised its right to have delegates in attendance at Committee meetings.  The Committee has included two Councillor representatives as delegates.

 

NSW North Coast Weed Advisory Committee

 

Cr Ainsworth

Tim Woodward

The objectives of the Committee are to promote awareness of noxious and environment weeds, to recommend weed policy, and to educate and train people in all matters pertaining to weeds.  The Committee meets about quarterly.

 

Vehicular Access to Beaches Committee

 

Cr Ainsworth

Cr Finlayson

Cr Flack

Cr Bob Morrison

Council has a policy of permitting authorised and licensed motor vehicles to gain access to designated beach areas in the Shire and the Committee meets to address the implementation of the policy including standard of access, signage, repairs to access, fees etc.  This Committee generally only meets twice a year to assess beach access points and any repairs which might be necessary.

 

 

Beside the Committees listed above, in 2012 the Council considered the establishment of a Library Committee.  At the time the Council had recently withdrawn from the Clarence Regional Library and it was resolved to further consider the matter at a later date so as to allow staff to concentrate on establishing the “stand alone” library service.  It was resolved that Cr Smyth be the Council’s representative at the Public Libraries NSW North East Zone meetings with Cr MacDonald as observer, and together with the Senior Librarian were to report back to Council on matters of interest.

 

In 2012 the Council resolved to disband the Plant Committee and that a quarterly report be provided to Council on plant purchases and plant condition as part of the Quarterly Budget Review.

 

In 2012 the Council also resolved to disband the Aboriginal Community Advisory Committee and instead hold an annual Aboriginal forum using Council’s Aboriginal Culture and Heritage Management Plan as a point of reference with the aim of raising relevant issues that can formally feed into Council’s processes.  In addition that Council maintain an annual Elders morning tea.

 

The following suggestions have been received from Councillors.

 

CLEAN ENERGY COMMITTEE OF COUNCIL

 

Author:  Cr Susan Jenvey

 

One of the biggest issues facing our country and future generations is that of climate change. I believe now is the time for council to show leadership and establish an advisory committee to build a plan to help our region take hold of clean energy opportunities, and transition away from non-renewable energy resources.

 

A Clean Energy Committee of Council would recognize the science, backed by the recent global agreements of The Paris Summit, that fossil fuel use is leading to an irrefutable 1.5 degree warming of our planet by 2050.

 

To save on staffing costs for the committee, in the spirit of the proposed Joint Organisation of Councils, council could share staffing with Bellingen Council who hold similar views and similar investment strategies.

 

The committee would have a charter to investigate councils own fossil fuel footprint and be developing long term strategies for replacement vehicles and energy use of councils holdings.

 

It could research long term planning away from the mass adoption of the individual car and suburban sprawl into more urban, collective, public transport driven communal towns, like inner cities, that are vibrant and intense places to live and prosper. Future commitments to planning have to project further into the future.

 

The committee would investigate the business opportunities for investment in renewable energy using the attractive investment loan rates of the Clean Energy Finance Corporation. The committee should be investigating the feasibility of council owning small scale renewable energy plants for electrical generation. Understanding sound financial principles to do with innovative technological investment could prove to be the grounding for the best returns on investment, because they represent a tangible, money generating asset as opposed to investing in the opaque world of bonds and managed funds. These investments, while generating returns, can fluctuate, these funds can and do suffer contagion from the globalization of poor banking practices and council ultimately lacks control and regulation around re-numeration reports, the gerrymandering of boards, and investment strategies.

 

Council needs to investigate whether there may be short to medium term opportunities for reasonable savings to council's operational costs using the finance available of the Clean Energy Fund to loan and borrow and operate a cheaper source of street lighting with more energy efficient lighting.

 

The Clean Energy committee would also recognize that biodiversity is an essential component of future inter-generational equality. Extinction is forever. The committee should be able to comment as a voice of authority on controversial planning applications. Our heritage needs protection from the insatiable, market driven demand for floor space. Councils own independent report monitoring community satisfaction with facilities and services managed by the Nambucca Shire Council shows the community places a higher importance on, but gives council a low satisfaction rating on environmental monitoring and protection.

 

The committee could be used to lobby for payment for ecosystem services on farmland and managed land to preserve biodiversity and protect riverine habitat. This would be using financial incentive to do the right thing.

 

It would make sense for the Clean Energy Committee to oversee the environment levy.

 

Comment from the General Manager

 

At Council’s meeting on 26 May 2016 it was resolved that staff investigate opportunities to develop projects using solar panels and investigate what other authorities across the world are doing and to report this back to Council with ideas including opportunities to reduce energy costs at the Bowra Dam such as floating solar panels on the dam surface; further that this report includes funding opportunities.

 

In the context of this resolution, a Clean Energy Committee could further develop these opportunities and also provide some needed impetus for the conversion of the Valley’s street lighting to LED.  Some years ago the Council accepted a proposal from Essential Energy to install more energy efficient street lights, with this proposal being quickly overtaken by the even more energy efficient LED lamps.  It is understood that Essential Energy has now accepted a tender from GE for the supply of LED street lamps, however tenders are required for their installation.  This will be a massive job across the north coast and it makes sense for Councils to collaborate in that tender.

 

It is understood that Bellingen Shire Council is more advanced than this council in their program for reducing energy consumption and reliance on fossil fuels, and with the opportunities to achieve some economies in procurement, there is merit in the suggestion of a joint committee.

 

COMMITTEE FOR INCLUSIVE GROWTH And SMALL BUSINESS ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IN THE SERVICE SECTOR

 

Author:  Cr Susan Jenvey

 

An Inclusive Growth and Small Business Economic Development In the Service Sector Committee would investigate community strategies to deal with rising inequality and declining living standards as well as promote small business strategies in the changing workplace of our local environment. Council could seek expressions of interest from the community for those participating in these areas of interest.

 

Promoting Small Business Strategies In The Service Sector:

 

A Committee for Inclusive Growth and Small Business Economic Development In A Service Sector could function to offer contrary investment advice regarding councils investment in employment lands. Council needs to make sure its investment strategy into employment lands is fit for purpose. It needs to quantify and be mindful of its strategy to invest in employment lands, that within the decade the jobs gained through this strategy could be lost to automation. The committee should have a business ratings index, based on qualified academic research on employment strategies into the likelihood of future job losses by industry categorization from automation. 

 

An Inclusive Growth and Small Business Committee could also have a digital economy strategy. It could measure how people are locally using the digital economy to create wealth and employment. What future skills will be needed and how can the change be effectively leveraged.

 

An Inclusive Growth and Economic Development Committee could also look at how culture in regional areas can not only be lucrative but have the ability to shape and influence our regional identity. This would include ways to incorporate and promote local music, dance, writing, coffee, gourmet food trails, farm shops and Aboriginal culture. It includes festivals of all types, growers markets and second hand markets. These should be based in our towns and not the show grounds so that local businesses can benefit from the people who might frequent these gatherings.

 

For instance, the second hand economy in Australia is worth $10 billion dollars annually. Council with its numerous opportunity shops within the government area could help to facilitate an Antique and collectables market.

 

The committee could oversee tourism marketing. The most recent report from Jetty Research that measured satisfaction with services rated tourism marketing as being of high importance to residents and ratepayers but gets a low rate of satisfaction from the services council carries out in this area.

 

 Nambucca should feel like a tourist town when you enter it and it doesn't. With all its real estates and job search agencies in the main street it says that people come here, can't find any work and leave. Instead of a free market approach council could develop a code of practice policy that encourages a high street atmosphere in Nambucca as well as revisiting and seeking funding for its street scape.

 

The committee could also promote and help to facilitate local commercialization of rural and complementary allied rural service industries. We are experiencing a rural boom selling clean and green products into overseas, local and city markets.  That could go on for a long time. There is currently a boom in blueberries, garlic, macadamias, beef, organic produce, and free range eggs. What is missing is policy to promote and encourage cafes, BnB's, Farm Stays and Farm Shops in rural areas. Despite living in a rural economy I cannot buy grass fed, grass finished, home killed local beef from a farm shop. Why?

 

The Background on Inclusive Growth

 

Rising social inequality is a structural issue for our society, and not a failure of the individual to want to work. It is proven that economies grow faster when everyone shares in the growth. Evidence shows that rising inequality is a threat to economic growth. There are real economic and political risks to wealth concentration and there is real despair in our community over ordinary people's place in the economy; who that economy belongs to and who it serves.

 

The OECD states, “Growing inequality bears a cost on future economic growth, particularly where equality of opportunity locks in privilege and exclusion, undermining inter-generational social mobility”.

 

5 key elements for inclusive prosperity.

1.       good jobs and wages

2.       affordable homes

3.       security in retirement

4.       good education

5.       good health    

 

Around these everyday household assets wrap issues of clean environment and good government.

 

The fundamental mechanisms of inclusive growth are under attack.

 

Key changes include

·      economic transformation of Asia – globalization and changing global supply chains

·      technological progress and digital disruption – rapid computerization is replacing low, semi and highly skilled tasks and shifting patterns of work. This needs to managed in an inclusive way.

·      Diversification of the Australian economy- diversifying into a service based economy and advanced manufacturing with new industries such as clean energy

·      aging population.

 

Australia's decades long growth has not lifted incomes and wealth in the same way across all households. Those at the top of distribution have experienced stronger gains at the expense of middle Australia.

 

·      Middle income earners are also facing increased job insecurity as a result of the rise of technology and automation.

 

Growing inequality, automation and low wages growth are threatening the progress and achievements of the last century.

 

·      Australia is one of only four OECD countries where the minimum wage is falling in comparison to the average wage.

 

·      In an era of increasingly rapid technology diffusion and automation, and the disruption that goes with it, as we get better at automating routine tasks, the people who benefit the most are those with expertise and creativity to use these advances. Workers with less education and expertise will fall behind.

 

·      Home ownership in Australia is at a 60 year low. Falling home ownership rates for young people mean they now have less wealth than people the same age eight years ago. If young people can't afford a home, then the opportunity for wealth creation by borrowing against the home will be cut off as well.

 

Our council area has high levels of:

 

·      Aboriginal disadvantage.

 

·      Unemployment. Failure in the labour market is not an individual personal issue. It is a problem with our economic and social structures.

 

This current Federal government, through the McClure Report, is wanting to reduce welfare expenditure. This is different from wanting to reduce poverty and inequality. The report measures getting people off benefit.

 

Leaving benefit and getting a job are positively, but not perfectly related. People may go off benefit into education, building a debt they cannot service. They may move into the black or grey economy. They may re-partner. They may become homeless or get a job.

 

The investment approach is indifferent to these different destinations. The investment approach treats all jobs as equals. Indifferent whether they are well paid or not, whether the job suits family life or not, or whether the resulting commute is long or short. The reforms have been criticised for making life harder for welfare recipients, encouraging them to drop out of the system altogether. It pushes families into poverty and in Auckland where the McClure report bases its findings homelessness doubled in 2 years.

 

The government needs to adopt a more human approach toward unemployed workers and social security recipients.  By official figures there are 11 job seekers competing for every job vacancy. As of April 2016 the Newstart Allowance is $386 below the poverty line per fortnight. This payment has not been increased in real terms for 22 years and has come to represent a barrier to employment.

 

·      Moving people into insecure, casualised labour market does not alleviate poverty

 

·      Job Agencies have been given the power to fine, even harass the poor, even though there is a scarcity of work. Work for the dole has been expanded as has Income management. (The government has indicated it will expand the Healthy welfare card (income management) across all rural areas). This has major implications for Nambucca.

 

·      High Youth unemployment.

 

·      Underemployment.

 

·      Age discrimination. Hit 50 and your 50% less likely to get that job.

 

·      Homelessness

 

·      Justice reinvestment. NSW State Government is spending $3 billion on new jails. This is a failure of our system.

 

Council’s budget for community development is very small. It does not currently fund a youth or drop in center.  Although this is a service of lesser importance to residents and ratepayers it is still given a low satisfaction rating on service delivery.

 

The Committee of Inclusive Growth and Small Business Development could work with the community services sector as this trend continues. It could lobby Federal and State Governments to help those that don't have a voice to be heard. It could promote the advantages of inclusive growth for the whole economy and resist in trickle down economic ideology.

 

It could investigate innovative low cost housing schemes. Be aware of the possibility for middle income hardship from low wages growth when it considers rate pegging and rate rises. And be aware of the polarisation in our community from people who are being excluded from the system.

 

Comment from the General Manager

 

The background discussion of the proposed Inclusive Growth and Small Business Committee is wide ranging and without disputing or otherwise the merits, it covers many matters wholly or largely outside the control of this council.  Growing household inequality, a falling minimum wage, Aboriginal disadvantage, age discrimination, high youth unemployment, underemployment, homelessness and rates of incarceration are all significant challenges in our society but Council has no or very limited ability to influence them.

 

To the extent that the background discussion suggests that Council change its emphasis in fostering economic development away from traditional manufacturing and industrial parks towards the creative industries and the digital economy is a substantive issue for discussion and particularly in the “run-up” to Council reviewing its Community Strategic Plan (needs to be completed 10 March 2017).  However the proposed title, “Inclusive Growth and Small Business Committee” suggests one particular economic model whereas Council has previously operated an Economic Directions Committee with a wider brief.  An Economic Directions Committee was established in 2011 comprising 10 members of the public and 2 councillors being Cr Finlayson and Cr Ainsworth.  The established terms of reference for the Committee are as follows:

 

·    To meet quarterly or as required to discuss economic development initiatives and provide feedback to Council on specific projects put to Council.

·    To identify emerging industries and opportunities with potential for future growth and investment.

·    To identify investment potential within the Shire and act as a lobby group for economic development on behalf of council working with Council’s Manager of Business Development.

·    To identify new infrastructure required within the Shire that will deliver economic growth and identify old infrastructure that is in need of repair that can deliver new economic activity.

·    To identify investment potential within the Shire and drive employment creation.

 

The Committee last met on 25 March 2014 and a copy of those minutes is attached.  It is suggested that the Economic Directions Committee be reconstituted.

 

 

CONSULTATION:

 

There has been consultation with the Assistant General Manager Corporate Services.

 

There has been consultation with Council’s Coordinator Strategic Planning and Natural Resources, particularly in relation to the proposed Clean Energy Committee.  His comments are as follows:

 

The following comments relate specifically to the Clean Energy Committee:

 

-       Be able to comment on significant DA’s, this would require frequent committee meetings and reporting on DA’s of particular nature. Commentary would also be provided by staff from other Council who may be less familiar with local issues. This could hold up the DA process, overwhelm staff with additional work not otherwise involved in the DA process or require development staff to contribute to the process;

-       There are a lot of tasks the committee would investigate, I am assuming this would be staff involved;

-       Council has recently committed to the sustainability advantage program I have attached a report prepared recently. This is a program run by OEH which encompasses many of the concepts raised, depending on the priorities identified by Council. The program is funded by the part of the Climate change Adaptation fund in the Environmental Levy. The benefit of this program is that for a minimal fee Council engages with the relevant government experts on sustainability issues and also becomes part of a broader body of Councils also involved in the program who can share on their experiences. Given Council has committed to this program, it would best not to duplicate processes and ensure Council is kept up to date on the outcomes.

-       Council is looking at the LED street lighting and the levy has committed to this for the last 3 years, it is understood energy efficient lighting is being installed this year, you would need to clarify with engineering staff?

-       The committee is proposed to oversee the Environmental Levy. At present the Environmental Levy is managed by Council and I believe this has proven to be a successful model over the last few years. Councillors and members of the public are provided with an opportunity to comment on the levy and proposed projects.  The environmental levy funds a very broad suite of projects supporting social and environmental outcomes, the projects are not isolated to biodiversity or clean energy programs.

-       for council’s information we are preparing 2 grant applications for the building resilience to climate change program, including solar panels on Council buildings in Macksville and ‘Growing resilience in Macksville’ which is supplementing the $40k levy budget for Macksville street trees with an addition $80K if successful.  Both projects are implementing actions of our Climate Change Adaptation Strategy.

 

There has been consultation with Council’s Manager Business Development who is supportive of reconstituting the Economic Directions Committee.

 

Cr Janine Reed has made the following comments:

 

1       Tourism & Business / Economic Development:  I believe the future is bright for the Shire, but with my experience, this shouldn’t be left to Chambers (who are all administered by time poor volunteers), or other similar groups.  There would be benefits in getting everyone walking in the same direction – Nambucca, Macksville, Bowraville.  One of the best opportunities we have here is tourism, although the stock is stale and out-dated, we are well situated for development in that area.  Due to time restraints I have done a quick search of similar Terms of Reference and I hope to get back to you soon on this.  A focus could be that we are a “can do” LGA, and to reduce red tape wherever possible.  The inclusion of “business” should not overlook primary production – still an important player.

2       This could be linked with the above – but we need a strong committee to take us to post by-pass.  Either this or the above, could have sub-committees as we identify particular areas, and I have ideas for that.

3     Aboriginal – as Council is taking submissions on “welcome to country”, in considering this, I think a lot more could be done in this area.  For instance, with the highway by-pass, we could give consideration to embracing an aboriginal theme (have you seen the doors at Macksville TAFE)?  Acknowledging the aboriginal community of the past, may well lift the confidence of a large sector of our community

 

 

SUSTAINABILITY ASSESSMENT:

 

Environment

There are no implications for the environment.

 

Social

There are no social implications.

 

Economic

There are no economic implications.

 

Risk

The main risk concerns the opportunity cost of Councillors and staff applying their limited time to supporting the operation of committees.  All committees need to be able to demonstrate that better outcomes were achieved through their deliberations than would have occurred without them.

 

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS:

 

Direct and indirect impact on current and future budgets

There is no budgetary impact.

 

Source of fund and any variance to working funds

There is no impact on working funds.

 

Service level changes and resourcing/staff implications

The management of committees can require a significant commitment of staff time.  This arises out of the preparation and circulation of agendas, attending meetings, responding to questions and proposals from committee members as well as preparing and actioning minutes.  The commitment of staff time is a cost borne by the organisation so requires careful consideration.  Of course there are also time and expense costs incurred by committee members other than council staff which also need to be considered.

 

 

Attachments:

1

6382/2014 - Minutes - Economic Directions Committee - 25 March 2014

 

2

25031/2016 - Opportunities for Projects using Solar Panels

 


Ordinary Council Meeting - 13 October 2016

Council Advisory Committees

 

 

PRESENT

 

Cr Rhonda Hoban

Mayor

Cr John Ainsworth (Chair)

Deputy Mayor

Cr Brian Finlayson

Councillor

Michael Coulter

General Manager

Wayne Lowe

Manager Business Development

Steve Benson

Tinks

Paul Hoffman

Express Coaches

Robyn Kennedy

Nambucca River Houseboats

Barry Kerr

 

Joe Saliba

 

Adrienne Smith

MidCoast Trucks

 

 

APOLOGIES

 

Peter Trisley

Trisley’s Betta Electrical

 

 

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES OF PREVIOUS MEETING – 28 JANUARY 2014

 

The minutes of the Economics Directions Committee held on 28 January 2014 were adopted. (Hoffman/Hoban)

 

 

BUSINESS ARISING FROM PREVIOUS MINUTES

 

There was discussion about the ADSL connection of the Macksville industrial area.  It was queried why the industrial estate could not connect to the wireless NBN.

 

RESOLVED:                   (Hoffman/Smith)

Agreed to discuss with the Hon Luke Hartsuyker MP the provisions of wireless NBN to the Macksville industrial estate or at least an interim period until fibre optic is available

 

 

GENERAL BUSINESS

 

1          CELEBRATE BUSINESS AND INDUSTRY BUSINESS NETWORKING DINNER (INDUSTRY DEVELOPMENT)

 

RESOLVED:                   (Hoffman/Saliba)

That the Committee support the concept of a celebrate business and Industry Business Networking Dinner as proposed by Council’s Manager Business Development as a means of showcasing business and marketing the businesses and the Shire.

 

2          PROPOSED ALDI SUPERMARKET DEVELOPMENT   3–5 YEAR PLAN AND SITE SELECTION

 

The Manager Business Development provided a briefing on Aldi’s proposal to establish a supermarket in a 3-5 year time frame.

 

 

OTHER BUSINESS

 

·       Barry Kerr raised issues Nambucca Valley Care has had with Council over fees and other matters.  Janine Reed advised Barry that Council could have given more help to Nambucca Valley Care being a registered charity with fee relief and other matters.

 

·       Deputy Mayor John Ainsworth raised State Government grant funding which has been made available for maintenance dredging.  There was discussion about the environmental issues of selling the sand.  It was advised that maintenance dredging did not allow the sale of the dredged sand.

 

·       Report on land stock held by Council.  Briefing provided by Manager Business Development.

 

 

NEXT MEETING

 

It was agreed that the next meeting of the Committee would be held in approximately two (2) months.

 

 

MEETING CLOSURE

 

The meeting closed at 1.07 pm. 

 

 

 

 

Cr John Ainsworth

CHAIRPERSON

 


Ordinary Council Meeting - 13 October 2016

Council Advisory Committees

 

General Manager's Report

ITEM 9.4      SF688              110816         Opportunities for Projects using Solar Panels

 

AUTHOR/ENQUIRIES:    Lisa Hall, Technical Officer - Development and Environment         

 


 

Summary:

 

Council resolved on 26 May 2016 that staff investigate opportunities to develop projects using solar panels and investigate what other authorities across the world are doing and to report this back to Council with ideas including opportunities to reduce energy costs at the Bowra Dam site such as floating solar panels on the Dam surface; further that this report includes funding opportunities.

 

This report provides information about projects using solar panels at Bellingen Shire Council, Lismore City Council and Willoughby City Council, as well as overseas projects in Japan and England.

 

Investigations have revealed a useful and cost-effective initiative – Sustainability Advantage – which is promoted and heavily subsidised by the Office of Environment & Heritage. It is believed that investing in this program will provide the best way, all things considered, to investigate which Council facilities would be best suited to the installation of solar panels, as well as enabling a much fuller audit of all of Council’s operations, with likely increased funding opportunities from OEH if Council participates in the program.

 

 


 

Recommendation:

 

1        That Council become a Sustainability Advantage Partner at a cost of $4,000 with funds coming from the Environmental Levy Budget – Climate Change Adaptation Fund.

 

2        That one of the sustainability projects to be investigated under the program be the installation of solar panels at Council facilities.

 

 


 

OPTIONS:

 

1        Council may choose to engage a consultant to examine the feasibility of solar panel installation on Council facilities.

2        Council may choose not to further investigate installing solar panels on Council facilities.

3        Council may choose to investigate establishing a Revolving Energy Fund (REF), similar to that operated by Bellingen Shire Council.

 

 

DISCUSSION:

 

Other authorities in NSW and around the world are using solar panels (and solar hot water heating, where needed) on public buildings, sewage treatment plants, car parks and dams. Five projects are discussed in detail below, together with information on how they were funded, where that information has been made available.

 

Bellingen Shire Council: Solar Photovoltaic Installations on Council sites

 

At Bellingen Shire Council’s (BSC) meeting on 25 May 2016, a report was presented to Council about the above issue. The installation of solar panels on Council sites forms part of the Bellingen Emissions Reduction Program (BERP) – information about BERP can be obtained from the BSC website.

 

A BSC Resolution was made on 22 April 2015 to investigate the feasibility of the installation of renewable energy supply and efficiency measures at Council’s largest energy consuming sites. As such Council engaged Bellingen Solar Depot to complete this work. Whilst the exact cost to BSC is confidential, it is believed to be in excess of $4,000.

 

The consultants reported as follows on the implications of installing solar panels on BSC’s 15 biggest electricity users:

 

Facility

Average annual net cash benefit after installation & maintenance at today’s prices ($)

Average annual net cash benefit after installation & maintenance, incorporating depreciation & CPI

($)

Total net cash benefit during 25 year lifetime after installation & maintenance, incorporating depreciation & CPI

($)

Financial payback period (years)

Main Administration Building

17,960

21,309

532,728

2.85

Raleigh Depot

16,360

19,567

489,180

2.29

Dorrigo Waste Water Treatment Plant

9,330

11,140

278,486

2.72

Urunga Waste Water Treatment Plant

8,675

9,892

249,543

3.21

Bellingen Pool

6,490

7,631

190,779

3.13

Bellingen Water Treatment Plant

4,600

5,309

132,735

3.60

Raleigh Waste Management Facility

4,235

5,044

126,117

3.19

Bellingen Infiltration Well

3,800

4,327

108,185

2.97

Dorrigo Depot

3,800

4,512

112,795

2.92

Bellingen Waste Water Treatment Plant

3,730

4,425

110,634

2.92

Dorrigo Water Treatment Plant

3,640

4,303

107,563

3.05

Dorrigo Library

2,090

2,438

60,950

3.46

Urunga Library

1,500

1,720

43,004

3.79

Bellingen Waste Transfer Station (stand alone system)

860

1,020

25,492

0

Total

$87,070

$102,640

$2,568,190

Average

2.86

 

The following assumptions were made in completing the information above:

 

·              A 25 year service life on Tier 1 performance grade panels

·              A small technology certificate value of $40

·              Inverter lifespan of 13 years for good quality brands

·              A degradation of 0.5% in performance every year due to UV damage to the solar panel cells

·              Depreciation diminishing over 25 years

·              Consumer Price Index increase over time at 2.4% per annum

·              Cleaning cost each year which varies according to installation size

·              A disposal cost of approximately $50 per solar panel

 

It is anticipated that the above installations will save approximately 357 tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent emissions per year.

 

BSC resolved on 4 December 2007 to set up a Revolving Energy Fund (REF). The REF is maintained through the transfer of savings from energy efficiency measures and the installation of renewable energy supply into an account of funds to be made available to implement further efficiency and cost savings. Savings of $60,470 achieved during 2014/15 have been deposited into the existing amount in the fund, making the total amount now available for expenditure $118,335.

 

BSC has resolved that the Revolving Energy Fund (REF) be used to fund the installations on the main administration building, Raleigh depot and Dorrigo depot. Financial savings resulting from these installations are to be deposited back into the REF for expenditure on future installations. The above allocation of funding out of the REF would allow sufficient remaining funds in the REF to be allocated as matching funds in grant applications to complete the solar installations at the Bellingen Pool, Dorrigo Library and Urunga Library. It is expected that these facilities are more likely to attract grants under community wellbeing funding programs.

 

It is proposed that the funding required to complete installations on the water facilities is sourced from the capital works budget reserves, with the resulting financial savings reducing expenditure from this budget over the life time of the operation of the installations on these facilities. The feasibility assessment of each site identified a maximum payback period for installations on water facilities as 3.60 years, meaning that costs will be recovered by the end of that period. It is also proposed to allocate money from the capital works budget to the installations at the Raleigh Waste Facility and at the Bellingen Waste Transfer Station.

 

Completing all assessed installations would result in a total net cash benefit during the minimum 25 year effective operating period of $2,568,190. It is expected that installations will perform well beyond this period, resulting in ongoing financial savings. The average annual net financial benefit of the installations over this lifetime is expected to be $102,640.

 

Lismore City Council (LCC) – Council operated and community owned Solar farms

 

In December 2014 LCC adopted a Renewable Energy Master Plan with a goal to self-generate all their electricity from renewable source by 2023. The process started in 2013 when Council undertook the largest community consultation in its 134-year history. During the 18-month Imagine Lismore consultation, thousands of residents were asked to identify their priorities and the environment topped the list of things people cared about. The community expressed a wish for Lismore to become a model of sustainability.

 

From this consultation, LCC developed a Renewable Energy Master Plan. It follows on from a decade of work in which Council tried to reduce greenhouse gas emissions after recognising climate change was a reality.

 

The Renewable Energy Master Plan involves two distinct stages:

 

Stage 1 involves significantly reducing consumption with a range of energy efficiency measures such as switching to LED lighting and installing solar PV and solar hot water systems at Council-owned sites. Stage 1 will cost $4 million with a pay-back period of six to seven years.

 

Stage 2 involves construction of a large-scale 3.8-4.7 MW solar plant, which would cost approximately $15 million. The Renewable Energy Master Plan determined that at present Stage 2 is not commercially viable. However, it is expected that developments across a range of areas such as storage technology and the ability to ‘move’ electricity across sites will occur in coming years. Therefore the recommendation is to maintain watch on such developments and prepare for implementation of Stage 2 closer to the target year of 2023

 

LCC and Farming the Sun launched the Lismore Community Solar initiative in May 2013. The goal is to establish a council/community solar farm in Lismore – potentially the first of its kind in Australia.

 

Since then in-depth investigation has gone into suitable sites and suitable financial models to get the solar farm up and running. The initial concept was to have a 250kW solar system owned by the community, with Council agreeing to buy back the power over a decade or more. However, obstacles such as difficulties with sharing power across Council sites and the uncertainty of federal renewable energy policy has led to a change in thinking. It has become clear that two smaller-scale projects will be more viable and the financial model would be in the form of a community loan rather than a power purchase agreement.

 

The Lismore Community Solar investment structure is now based on two community companies, each with 20 shareholders, lending funds to Lismore City Council. The loans will be used to construct and operate two 100kW solar farms at the Goonellabah Sports and Aquatic Centre and the East Lismore Sewage Treatment Plant.

 

Investors would be asked to purchase shares between $8000 and $9000 with a four per cent per annum return and a pay-back period including up-front capital of seven years.

 

Farming the Sun has launched an investor pledge campaign to attract 40 investors to buy shares in Lismore Community Solar. The event was well attended and there are already more than 101 pledges.

 

Council adopted the financial business model at its meeting of 13 October 2015. A prospectus is now being prepared by Farming the Sun for share offers.

 

Willoughby City Council (WCC): Solar Farm, Albert Avenue Car Park

 

In October 2011 the first stage of the Albert Avenue Car Park Solar Farm Project located adjacent to Westfield Shopping Centre, Chatswood was completed on behalf of WCC. The peak capacity of the Car Park Solar Installation is 34kW.

 

Description: Description: http://www.solgen.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/Government-solar-panel-installation-for-Westfield-Carpark-solgen-energy-group-img4.jpg

 

In July 2012 a contract for an additional 133kW solar power system for Stage 2 of the Albert Avenue Car Park Solar Farm was awarded. The combined system size is 170kWp. It was completed in November 2012 and generates savings of 273 tonnes of CO2 emissions per annum, whilst generating approximately 250 MWh per annum of solar energy

 

One of WCC’s key requirements for the Stage 2 Solar Farm was to feed renewable electricity from the Solar Array into a neighbouring community building called the Dougherty Centre. The green energy produced from the Albert Avenue Solar Farm contributes to the common area electrical load for the centre.

 

The system continues to promote WCC as a community champion in environmental initiatives. It visibly demonstrates Council’s commitment to taking action on climate change and simultaneously provides it with financial and environmental rewards.

 

The benefits of the combined Stage 1 and Stage 2 installations include:

·           Providing a highly visible example to the general community of the potential of renewable energy and sustainable practices

·           The production of  approximately 250 MWh of electricity per annum, thus reducing Council’s energy consumption and associated costs

·           The reduction of CO2 emissions by 273 tonnes per annum and Council’s subsequent carbon footprint

 

Kyocera, Japan – Floating Solar Farm

 

The Japanese electronics multinational Kyocera has recently begun work on what it claims will be the world’s biggest floating solar farm.

 

The power plant is being built on a reservoir in Japan’s Chiba prefecture and is anticipated to supply enough electricity for nearly 5,000 households when it is completed in early 2018.

 

Several floating solar farms have already been built in Japan as part of the country’s drive to exploit more renewable energy in the wake of the 2011 Fukushima disaster. The shutdown of nuclear plants has seen Japan increasingly reliant on fossil fuel imports that have hit its emissions-cutting ambitions.

 

The Yamakura dam power plant will see more than 50,000 solar photovoltaic panels cover 180,000 m sq area, but compared to other land-based plants it is relatively small. At 13.7MW when finished, it would not make the top 100 of the world’s largest solar photovoltaic farms.

 

Finding land for utility-scale solar power plants has become a challenge in Japan due to limited availability of land space and rapid implementation of solar power. The construction of solar power projects on lakes is considered to be a practical solution, as it allows the available land to be used for agriculture, conservation and other developments. Moreover, Japan has a number of inland waterways and reservoirs built for agricultural and flood-control purposes that can be used for the development of solar power plants.

 

With an objective to reduce its burden on the environment, the Public Enterprises Agency of Chiba Prefecture began encouraging companies to build and operate a floating solar power plant at the Yamakura Dam. Kyocera TCL Solar was selected to undertake the solar power project.

 

Kyocera has already built three floating solar farms, which are much smaller than the new one, which was first announced in October 2014.

 

Thames Water, UK – Floating solar power farm

 

On the outskirts of London, work is nearing completion on what will soon be Europe’s largest floating solar power farm. The £6m QEII project will generate enough electricity to power the utility’s local water treatment plants for decades. The energy will help provide clean drinking water to a populace of close to 10 million people in greater London and the south-east of England, a huge and often unrecognised drain on electricity, rather than nearby homes.

 

Thames Water has decided to install solar panels on water because the water is there, and might as well be used for this purpose. Floating panels, covering only about 6% of the reservoir, will have no impact on the ecosystem of the reservoir.

 

Though waterbirds, including moorhens and gulls, live on the margins, and a thin scum of litter is visible at the shore, the reservoir is not intended as a home to wildlife, and any fish living here are accidental visitors. Eighteen metres deep, it provides water for Londoners in a constantly churning stream. Although most of the population growth in London tends to be towards the east, most of the water still comes from reservoirs to the west of the city.

 

But future projects to make use of water companies’ reservoirs in order to provide solar power might be in doubt, as the government has reduced subsidies for solar and wind power. This would not affect the QEII project, but might have an effect on whether follow-up projects could go ahead.

 

Options for Nambucca Shire Council

 

It is possible that there may be savings to be found for Council by installing solar panels on Council’s facilities, including the Bowra Dam. The issue to be resolved is determining which, if any, facilities will benefit from the installation of solar panels. Due to the relatively low levels of feed in tariffs paid in NSW, Council is unlikely to see any financial benefit unless it is able to directly use, or to store and then use, any power it generates.

 

Council’s staff, particularly Council’s Manager Water & Sewerage, have undertaken some investigations into this issue. He notes that Council’s water supply and sewerage systems are large energy users so there may be some opportunity for offsetting costs with solar power. However, it is very complicated with the different tariffs and peak demand charges that are imposed by the energy suppliers as well as the intermittent demands of the treatment plants and pump stations themselves, to determine what savings can be made.

 

The sewerage treatment works at Nambucca Heads and Macksville are high energy users consuming around 20, 000 kWh of energy per month at a cost of around $5,000 per month. This is around 600 – 700 kWh per day. The predominant use of energy is for the aeration blowers that operate for around an hour at a time with 8 cycles during a 24 hour period. If the power requirement for the blowers could be provided during the daylight hours the cost of this might halve during this time and could save in the order of $1,000 /month or $12,000 per year. If the system cost $200,000, which is the assumed cost of the Lismore City Council system, it would take around 17 years to recoup the cost of this system.

 

The water supply headworks including bores and transfer pumps use approximately 100 kWh per month. Peak demands average around 150 KVA and can go over 300 KVA. The current cost is around $20,000 per month when filling the dam, down to $12,000 when the dam is full. This allows for no pumping during peak tariff times.

 

Given the large power demand of the pumps and our current management of pump run times Council’s Manager Water & Sewer doesn’t see solar as being cost effective in the short term. As water demand increases with population growth and more daytime pumping is required the use of solar power may become more viable particularly as its cost decreases. However having the space to accommodate panels close to the headworks infrastructure will remain a big problem.

 

Power usage at the dam itself is only around $400 - $500 per month so it is not believed that there is any great benefit to be obtained from installing solar power. Significant expenditure would be required on infrastructure to transfer the electricity generated to the water headworks site where it is used.

 

So that accurate information about costs and savings can be evaluated, he believes it would be better to engage a consultant to thoroughly investigate energy usage patterns at our largest power consuming installations and determine whether the energy likely to be produced by solar in this area is a match to provide cost savings.

 

Council’s Technical Officer – Assets also raised the issue of vandalism. The solar water heating panels on top of the Macksville Aquatic Centre were rendered useless due to the easy target they provided to vandals. There would be an ongoing cost to keeping solar panels operational in the public domain

 

Sustainability Advantage Program

 

Contact was made with the Office of Environment & Heritage (OEH) to seek their input on these matters. Information was provided about the Sustainability Advantage program (SA), which is a program through which OEH assists organisations who are committed to improving sustainability in their business operations. Sustainability Advantage is open to organisations from the not-for-profit, government and medium-to-large business sectors, and attracts participants from many industries, including manufacturing, commercial property, registered clubs, health, aged care, transport and education.

 

If Council was to join the program, we would receive:

 

·           Dedicated support from a Sustainability Advantage Advisor

·           Annual Diagnostic (sustainability health check) and agreed action plan

·           Assistance from expert sustainability consultants (up to 30 hours, valued at around $6,000)

·           Access to the Sustainability Advantage Recognition Scheme

·           Invitations to expert forums and networking events

·           Use of resources, tools and templates developed by Sustainability Advantage

·           Opportunities for leadership development and networking

·           Funding for special projects

·           Connection to other organisations in the Sustainability Advantage network

·           Access to Membership Hub (business information resources and online resources)

·           E-Bulletin

 

It would be possible for Council to use the 30 hours of expert assistance to have a report provided about installing solar panels on Council’s facilities and assets. Additionally, it is likely that other ways of becoming more sustainable and saving funds would be identified on top of this. Together with the opportunities for additional funding from OEH, the $4,000 cost involved to become a partner seems much better value than spending more than this to obtain a report about solar panel installations.

 

SA is forming clusters of similar businesses/sectors to provide greater opportunities to share information and conduct research into common areas of sustainability which that sector shares. Council would become part of the Local Government Cluster, which is aiming to implement 2 to 3 projects that address priority issues. The projects could be waste, energy, procurement & supply chain or policy or anything else identified by the cluster. There is no additional charge for this aspect of the program.

 

Currently, approximately ten Councils are Partner Councils and OEH and SA are working to have more Councils join.

 

Wollondilly Shire Council joined SA last year with a focus on improving sustainability in waste services through a Resource Recovery hub. Their Waste Officer believes it has been highly beneficial to be involved in the program. They have had sustainability training for staff, provided at no charge by OEH, additional funding from OEH, the opportunity to work collaboratively with other Councils and excellent provision of information. He highly recommended the program and said the benefits generated from the $4,000 program cost were highly worthwhile.

 

Discussions have also been held with Bellingen Shire Council staff who would be very interested to hear of Council’s experience and, if positive, would definitely consider investing in SA as well.

 

There is further information at http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/sustainabilityadvantage/index.htm - including case studies and learning modules that Council can complete.

 

Two documents with additional information are attached - an introductory information brochure and a form about the Diagnostic that is carried out.

 

The cost to Council is $,4000 and membership lasts for one year. It can be renewed annually for a long or short as Council wishes for whatever the annual fee is at the time.

 

A core group of Council staff - six to eight - will need to commit time to this project. It is anticipated that the majority of them will need to spend 3 to 4 hours a month on the project, with half a day needed for the diagnostic and other commitments to be determined once priorities are set.

 

Funding for identified projects

 

If Council was to join SA and sustainability projects were identified, the following sources of funds should be considered:

 

The Environmental Levy Budget – Climate Change Adaptation Fund could be a funding source for smaller projects. This fund has $20,200 this year – if $4,000 was invested in the SA program, $16,000 remains.

 

Grant funding could be sourced from OEH – it appears that participation in the program will lead to additional funding opportunities – some of which may be fully funded.

 

If larger projects are considered, Council may wish to allocate funds in the 2017-2018 Environmental Levy or seek a loan from the Clean Energy Finance Corporation. This entity has a Local Government Finance Program and is offering Australian councils access to tailored finance to help them invest in a range of clean energy technologies which will reduce energy costs while lowering emissions.

 

The CEFC Local Government Finance Program is designed to provide flexible and competitive fixed-rate, long-term finance tailored to the needs of Australian councils.

 

The program is targeting major investment projects with the potential to make a significant difference to a council’s energy consumption.

 

Eligible projects previously funded by the CEFC include:

 

·           Energy from waste projects – to create an energy source from council waste, reducing both landfill and energy costs

·           Rooftop solar PV on council buildings – to provide a renewable energy source using the council’s own assets

·           Street lighting upgrades – to convert to more efficient LED lighting, which can cut energy costs as well as operation and maintenance costs

·           Building upgrades – to improve energy efficiency through a broad range of options, reducing energy costs

·           Leisure and aquatic centres – to systematically address these high energy users, with a combined approach to introduce better heating, ventilation and air conditioning solutions as well as renewable energy sources

·           Electric and low emissions vehicles – to lower council fuel bills at the same time as lowering emissions; can include related infrastructure such as charging stations

 

If Council chooses to fund projects which save money as well as improving environmental sustainability, consideration should be given to creating a fund similar to Bellingen Shire Council’s Revolving Energy Fund. Council could choose to have a policy of investing a certain percentage of monies saved into such a fund to provide funding for future sustainability projects.

 

 

CONSULTATION:

 

Assistant General Manager Engineering Services

Manager Water & Sewerage

Manager Assets

Technical Officer – Assets

Manager Development & Environment

Coordinator Strategic Planning & Natural Resources

Office of Environment & Heritage

Wollondilly Shire Council

Bellingen Shire Council

 

 

SUSTAINABILITY ASSESSMENT:

 

Environment

 

The aim of the program is to identify ways in which Council’s processes can become more environmentally sustainable. It is expected that participation as a partner will have a beneficial environmental impact, not only initially, but on an ongoing basis.

 

Social

 

Whilst the main benefits to the Shire will be environmental and financial, it is considered that most of the community will endorse Council’s participation in such a project. Further, membership of the program is open to businesses, not-for-profit organisations and other government bodies – Council’s participation could lead to other organisations in the Shire also becoming involved, raising community interest in environmental issues.

 

Economic

 

It is expected that participation in the program will help identify savings to Council’s expenditure on such items as power, etc and increase levels of grant funding from OEH. The experience of other Councils, not-for-profits, government organisations and businesses is that savings discovered through the program have vastly offset the initial costs involved of implementing sustainability measures and staff time incurred.

 

Risk

 

There is no risk involved in participating in the program.

 

 

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS:

 

Direct and indirect impact on current and future budgets

 

There is a one-off fee of $4,000 to become a Sustainability Advantage partner for one year. Council may then choose to pay the same fee each year to renew its partnership. Partnership can cease whenever Council chooses.

 

Source of fund and any variance to working funds

 

If Council wishes to go ahead with the program, it is suggested that the $4,000 fee come from the Environmental Levy Fund – Climate Change Adaptation Fund.

 

Service level changes and resourcing/staff implications

 

A small group of Council staff - probably six to eight - will need to meet from time to time as part of the partnership. For most participants, this commitment will be approximately 2-3 hours per month. Given the potential budgetary savings and environmental improvements, it is considered that this commitment is reasonable.

 


Attachments:

1

25337/2016 - Sustainability Advantage Partner Membership

 

2

25338/2016 - Sustainability Advantage Diagnostic

 

 


Ordinary Council Meeting                                                                                               13 October 2016

General Manager

ITEM 9.4      SF959              131016         Outstanding Actions and Reports

 

AUTHOR/ENQUIRIES:    Michael Coulter, General Manager         

 

The following table is a report on all outstanding resolutions and questions from Councillors (except development consents, development control plans & local environmental plans). Matters which are simply noted or received, together with resolutions adopting rates, fees and charges are not listed as outstanding actions. Where matters have been actioned they are indicated with strikethrough and then removed from the report to the following meeting. Please note that the status comments have been made one week before the Council meeting.

 

 

Recommendation:

 

That the list of outstanding actions and reports be noted and received for information by Council.

 

 

 

 

 

FILE

NO

COUNCIL

MEETING

SUMMARY OF MATTER

ACTION

BY

STATUS

 

MARCH 2011

1

DA2010/234

17/3/11

Council develop a policy as to the cumulative impacts of locating fill on the floodplain at Macksville and also review the matrix in the Floodplain Risk Management Plan

 

GM

The draft Floodplain Risk Management Plan has been circulated to Councillors and the Estuary Committee.

Council has received a preliminary draft of the flood Risk Management Study and Plan which is presently being reviewed. The report will be distributed to Council and the Nambucca Rivers Creeks and Coastline Management Committee after this review is complete.

Council staff and OEH are reviewing the draft.  The draft requires further work before it can be circulated to the Estuary Committee and Councillors.

Draft now being circulated to Estuary Committee and Councillors.

 

Draft being uploaded to Council’s website.

 

 

JULY 2011

2

SF1031

21/7/11

That the policy for Climate Change Adaption be deferred to allow amendments to be made to the draft policy

 

GM

The project is awaiting the completion of the floodplain risk management matrix.

Council has received a preliminary draft of the flood Risk Management Study and Plan which is presently being reviewed. The report will be distributed to Council and the Nambucca Rivers Creeks and Coastline Management Committee after this review is complete.

 

Council staff are still in the process of reviewing the draft document.

 

 


 

AUGUST 2013

3

SF1031

14/08/13

That the tree policy be again presented after Councillors have had sufficient time to comment on the amendments presented by Councillors and in view of the previous motion of Council, namely “Tree Removal” (SF629) containing the 6D principles.

 

 

AGMES

Report in September 2013.

Deferred to October 2013.

At the request of Cr Morrison this item has been deferred to the first meeting in November 2013.

Cr Morrison has provided information to the Manager Civil Works who will draft a report to the December Council meeting.

Staff on leave during December – deferred until February 2014.

Deferred until April – Staff dealing with landslips.

Deferred until May 2014

Deferred until June 2014

Deferred until September 2014 and a report will be prepared on the outcome of the meeting.

Policy has been redrafted and a new operations procedures manual developed. A memo with the updated policy and procedures will be provided to Councillors for comment at the end of December

Deferred with staff on leave - Guidelines and tree assessment form developed and now being trialled for tree assessment with the Policy and guideline review to be presented to Council for comment after trial – anticipate April.

Deferred until September after the budget, restructure and staffing levels settle.

Provided to Councillors on 29 October for comment.

Not provided to Councillors on 29 October - now propose to provide to Councillors mid December 2015 for comment. 

 

Deferred whilst trialling the International Society of Arboriculture, Tree Hazard Evaluation form which is intended to replace the tree inspection form within the policy. The policy in its present form has shown some issues pertaining to property owners wanting healthy trees removed citing the criteria in the policy, the new form provides greater transparency and clarity   

 

New policy and procedures will be presented to the new Council in October for comment following the local government elections.

DECEMBER 2013

4

SF1842

11/12/13

That if Council and IPART support a rate increase above rate pegging, Council provide a quarterly report either through a media release or its rates newsletter to confirm to ratepayers that the additional funds are being spent on roads and bridges as indicated in our community consultation.

GM

The first quarterly report would be the rates newsletter to be distributed with the 2014/2015 rates notice.

Report produced.

Media release issued before 13 November Council meeting.

Second media release issued 20 May 2015.

Third media release issued 30 November 2015.

 

Proposed on-going progress report on Council’s capital works program with a monthly update to be listed on Council’s website.

MARCH 2015

5

SF841

12/03/15

Council make representations to the Member for Oxley, both pre and post 28 March 2015, for their support for the proposition that the bridges and major culvert structures which are located on the existing Pacific Highway through the Nambucca Valley should remain State assets and not be handed over to Council.

 

GM

Letter written w/e 20/3/2015.

As at June 2015 arrangements are being made for a consultant to assist Council staff in investigating the liability associated with the proposed handover of the existing Pacific Highway to Council.  Data provided by the RMS needs to be reviewed as well as a physical inspection of the road and bridge assets.

Mayor and GM met with the Member for Oxley on 18 September 2015.  Details of Council’s previous submissions forwarded to the Member for Oxley with a request that she make representations on behalf of Council.

The early estimates of annual depreciation for the northern section of the Pacific Hwy (Nambucca Heads to Oyster Creek) assets are proposed to be transferred is approximately $1million per annum.

Council is expecting receiving a written offer from the RMS in relation to the handover.

Council received a briefing from the consultants reviewing the RMS assets to be handed over to Council on 30 June 2016 and a compensation package will not be developed until the transfer of traffic onto the new highway as the pavement can’t be assessed until the traffic is transferred off the old highway.

 

A report on the status of the Bridges is anticipated in August

 

Mayor, GM and AGMES met with Member for Oxley on 16 August 2016.  Agreed that Council consult with other affected councils and submit a paper on the financial implications for the councils and options for a revised policy on Highway handovers.  In particular the Member for Oxley was interested in the proposition of IPART being asked to assess the appropriate handover package.

 

AUGUST 2015

6

SF674

13/08/15

Council write to the appropriate Minister drawing attention to the history of the matter (negotiations to extend Council’s Waste Depot) and particularly Council’s investment in studies made in good faith as well as the importance of the facility to the growth and security of our local community.

 

AGMES

Letter to be drafted to appropriate Minister.

Letter sent week ending 30 September 2015.

Nil response from the Minister to date, another letter sent 3 December 2015.

Response received from Minister and report to a meeting in March 2016.

 

Minister referred staff to Forests and a meeting is being organised with Forests NSW in 2016 for further discussion with a report to be presented to Council afterwards.

 


 

OCTOBER 2015

7

SF95

15/10/15

Following the 6 month trial period of nose-to-kerb parking arrangements in River Street adjacent to the river bank, that Council receive a further report on the outcome of the trial period.

 

AGMES

Report late 2016

Trial date not set as the Coordinator Strategic Planning and Natural Resources has to carry out a further round of public consultation regarding landscaping that includes the design for the roundabout and gauge feedback from effected business.

 

The roundabout is required to slow approaching traffic, and manage vehicles reversing into the carriageway. Design parameters at the bend require greater investigation before changing the parking arrangements.

 

Councillor’s verbally advised by AGMES on 11 August that the Manager Technical Services has advanced the trial and written to the properties on River Street advising that Council will implement the trial in October, signs have been ordered and order raised for the line marking contractor.

 

Trial underway with new markings installed Wednesday, 14 September 2016.

NOVEMBER 2015

8

SF2068

12/11/15

Council receive a future report on the preferred treatment options & procurement process to gain the most economical outcome for the recycled water scheme at the Bowraville STP.

 

AGMES

Report in 2016

9

SF1855

26/11/15

That Council receive a report regarding any options for traffic lights at River Street and Cooper Street following the completion of the Macksville by-pass.

 

GM

Report late 2017

APRIL 2016

10

SF1540

14/4/16

That Council apply to RMS through the Local Government Road Safety Program to have the speed limit from the railway bridge to the western side of Kuta Ave on Valla Beach Road reduced to 40kph.

 

AGMES

Letter sent

 

Response from RMS is forthcoming. Councils Manager Technical Services was verbally advised by the RMS that the section does not warrant a reduction in the speed limit to 40km/h and that RMS will be proposing traffic management solutions which are eligible for a 50:50 grant.

 


 

JUNE 2016

11

SF2172

16/6/16

That Council staff provide a report on a revised (bulky goods waste) voucher system being:

a. 2 vouchers used for 2 deliveries

b. 2 vouchers, of which one can be used for collection and the other used for delivery.

 

AGMES

Report to 28 July 2016 following the closure of community survey.

 

Report deferred to August as the survey undertaken by the University for the contractor and results are being correlated by a third party.

 

Still awaiting survey results being compiles by Southern Cross University. Deferred to October.

 

JULY 2016

12

LF968

14/7/16

Council note the inspection of drainage issues at Bangalow Drive, Nambucca Heads and that the drainage plans be discussed with the residents following which there be a further report to Council for its consideration.

 

AGMES

Letter sent to residents thanking them for the meeting and providing them with the three design options and their cost.

13

SF2183

28/7/16

1. That Council write to the NH’s Island Golf Club & ask them to advise on action they have taken & intend to take to ensure their financial sustainability & reduce their water consumption.

2. That Council receive a report on alternate methods to assist the NH’s Island Golf Club without altering Council’s adopted fees & charges to be considered by the new Council.

3. That Council request clarification of the term “vulnerable customer” from the Office of Water.

GM

Report in October 2016.  Definition of “vulnerable customer” has been clarified.

 

 

14

SF2081

28/7/16

Following consideration of the report on Shoaling and Dredging by Council’s Estuary Committee, there be a further report to Council concerning a possible maintenance dredging strategy.

GM

Report in October 2016.

AUGUST 2016

15

SF1148

25/8/16

Does NSC need to take any action to provide some form of transition for greyhound owners to prevent the destruction of dogs that are now of no commercial value?

 

GM

Council’s Ranger advises that he has met with the RSPCA and they have advised that if Council is contacted by any greyhound owner who wants to surrender their dogs, that Council can receive the dogs and the RSPCA will come and take them from Council for rehoming.  This is apparently part of the arrangements the State Government has entered into in relation to their decision to ban greyhound racing in NSW.  There will be no fee for the surrender of any animal.


 

16

SF325

25/8/16

That in consultation with the (Gordon Park) Tennis Committee of Management, Council staff investigate the option for not including the new Club house on Council’s asset register.

 

AGMCS

To be discussed with Auditors.

SEPTEMBER 2016

17

PRF14

29/9/16

Matter concerning Brook Park be deferred in order for Council to undertake a site inspection and that adjacent residents of Brook Park be notified of the inspection.

 

GM

To be scheduled for Council’s meeting on 10 November 2016 which is to be held at the Nambucca Community & Arts Centre, Nambucca Heads.

18

SF1541

29/9/16

Council staff report the intended exempt development controls to be implemented into Schedule 2 of the NLEP 2010 to Council for R5 zoned land only.

 

GM

Report in October 2016.

Attachments:

There are no attachments for this report.

 


Ordinary Council Meeting                                                                                               13 October 2016

General Manager

ITEM 9.5      SF848              131016         Outstanding Water Account

 

AUTHOR/ENQUIRIES:    Michael Coulter, General Manager         

 

Summary:

 

Council has had a long standing issue concerning the apparent inability of the Nambucca Heads Island Golf Club to pay for its water consumption.

 

As at 30 September 2016, the Club owed the Council $38,387.26 for its water consumption and also $7,000 in unpaid rental on its crown lands licence for the golf course proper (the Club and car park is contained on land owned by the Club).

 

It is recommended that Council offer the Club $ for $ assistance up to $50,000 for the employment of competent engineering or specialist golf course consultants to provide a range of costed options to reduce its reliance on the town water supply.  At the same time the Council needs to take action in relation to the outstanding charges.

 

 

Recommendation:

 

1        That Council offer the Nambucca Heads Island Golf Club $ for $ assistance of up to $50,000 for the employment of competent engineering or specialist golf course consultants to provide a range of costed options to reduce its reliance on the town water supply for irrigation.

 

2        The Nambucca Heads Island Golf Club be provided with one month to enter into an arrangement with Council staff for the payment of their outstanding water and Crown Lands licence charges.  Any agreement is to ensure their outstanding balance reduces over time.

 

3        That Council continue not to charge interest on the outstanding balance but in the event there is default on the agreement, that Council staff be authorised to apply a water restrictor to the premises without further notice.

 

 

OPTIONS:

 

The Council has a range of options in the matter.  Council staff deal with many ratepayers who face financial hardship and who have difficulty paying their rates and accounts for water usage.  The Council and its staff will be answerable to those ratepayers in relation to any inequities in the way in which Council deals with its sundry debtors.

 

 

DISCUSSION:

 

Council has had a long standing issue concerning the apparent inability of the Nambucca Heads Island Golf Club to pay for its water consumption.

 

On 22 September 2015, the then Secretary Manager of the Club wrote to Council noting that the Club had spent well over $48,000 on watering the golf course over the previous 12 months and enquiring whether Council was able to offer a reduced rate for the watering of recreational lands and playing fields such as the Golf Course.  A copy of that letter is attached.

 

The matter was reported to Council’s meeting on 12 November 2015.  The report noted that in relation to the request that Council provide a “reduced rate” for water, that Council applied a fixed per kilolitre charge of $2.90 to all water users in 2015/16 and that no discounts are provided.  It was noted that to entertain a discount for the Nambucca Heads Island Golf Club would open up the potential for a plethora of similar requests from various “not-for-profit” sporting associations and charities and accordingly was not recommended.

 

In relation to the report to Council’s meeting on 12 November 2015 it was resolved as follows:

 

1        That arrangements be made for the Mayor, General Manager and Rates Officer to meet with the    ratepayer referred to in the report to discuss their arrears and a repayment arrangement.

 

2        That the Mayor and General Manager be provided with delegated authority to enter into a     repayment arrangement with the ratepayer in relation to the arrears.

 

3        That the rate payer be asked to forward their June 2015 financial statement to Council.

 

The Mayor, General Manager and Rates Officer met with the then Secretary Manager of the Club on 22 January 2015.

 

The Secretary Manager discussed the financial problems facing the Club and the measures being put in place to pay their debts as they fall due.  He listed the following as the major contributing factors to the Club’s financial problems:

 

·   Strong competition between golf courses to retain membership whilst overall participation in golf seems to be stagnant or declining.

·   In terms of the competition between golf courses, 18 hole courses have a significant cost disadvantage compared to 9 hole courses

·   Loss of trading over 6 months in 2015 due to a flood in May and the work Council undertook to stabilise Riverside Drive

 

The Secretary Manager advised the Club was responding to these financial problems by:

 

·   Implementing a new staffing structure as from July 2015 whereby full time staffing has been reduced from 21 to 14.

·   Use of volunteers to undertake green maintenance, provide bar service and drive the courtesy bus

·   Sale of 6 poker machine licences in 2015 raising $60,000

 

The Secretary Manager was queried about the Club’s membership fees as well as the fees for a round of golf.  He advised that the membership fee was $495 with the fees for a round of golf being $7 for a social round and $17 for a competition round.  Whilst it was accepted that the greens had to be watered for the grass to stay alive and for the greens to be playable it was proposed to the Secretary Manager that the Club should stop watering fairways.

 

Other options which were put forward by the Council representatives for consideration were the reduction in the length of the course from 18 holes to 9 holes and noting the Club’s outstanding location, whether or not some tourist cabins may provide a source of revenue.

 

Besides the reasons for the financial problems provided in early 2015 it is understood that the Club has been the victim of a significant loss of funds through an alleged fraud.

 

The Council again considered the matter at its meeting on 11 February 2016 and resolved as follows:

 

1        That the information concerning the outstanding water account be noted.

 

2        That Council waive all accruing interest on the outstanding balance of the customer’s water account for the financial year 2015/2016.

 

3        That the customer’s progress in reducing the outstanding balance on their water account be reviewed in July 2016 in a report to Council.

 

4        That the customer be requested to refrain from using water on non-essential aspects of the activity as per the commentary in the report.

 

Subsequently the Council received a detailed submission from Cr Morrison on behalf of the Club querying various aspects of the Club’s charges and particularly their sewerage usage charge.  In response to Cr Morrison’s submission and by way of summary, a credit adjustment was provided to the Club totalling $51,949.42.  The credit adjustment came about principally as a consequence of the reversal of the Club’s sewer access charge for a 100mm (water) connection and its backdating to the introduction of the sewer access charge.

 

On 28 July 2016 the Council considered a Notice of Motion from Councillor Morrison proposing that Council apply the “vulnerable customer” concept to the Nambucca Heads Island Golf Club from the beginning of the last financial year (1 July 2015) at the applicable water, sewerage and trade waste charges for the golf club at the normal rate for the first 10,000kl usage per year (833kl per month) and thereafter 50% of the applicable rates.

 

In response to the Notice of Motion, it was resolved:

 

1        That Council write to Nambucca Heads Island Golf Club and ask them to advise on action they have taken and intend to take to ensure their financial sustainability and reduce their water consumption into the future.

 

2        That Council receive a report on alternate methods to assist the Nambucca Heads Island Golf Club without altering Council’s adopted fees and charges to be considered by the new Council.

 

3        That Council request a definition of the term “vulnerable customer” from the Office of Water.

 

Note:  Cr Morrison requested his vote be recorded against the motion as he believes there is no equity in the decision. The Aquatic Centre receives $450,000 in assistance but the Golf Club receives no assistance but instead pays $100,000 in fees, charges etc.

 

The Club has indicated its willingness to seek a meeting with Council to discuss matters in general pertaining to the Club and its situation in the Nambucca community.  Also a response from the Club to an article in the Guardian News on 4 August 2016 is attached.

 

In relation to the definition of the term “vulnerable customer”, this was provided to Council’s meeting on 11 August.  There is a detailed explanation in section 2.3.2 of the Best Practice Management of Water Supply and Sewerage Guidelines (page 12).  The explanation is as follows:

 

“2.3.2 Vulnerable Customers

 

Whilst best-practice water supply pricing will allow many customers to reduce their water supply bills, a small number of vulnerable customers may face financial hardship due to increased water bills.  Such customers are large families on low incomes, who have a high level of non-discretionary water use and home dialysis patients.

 

It is recommended that LWUs (Local Water Utilities) define vulnerable customers as families holding a Health Care Card and who have three or more children and households with a patient on home dialysis.

 

To mitigate the impact of best-practice pricing on vulnerable customers, LWUs may implement programs for reducing the bills of such customers.  Options available for LWUs in this regard include:

 

·   Targeted retrofit programs for the installation of low-flow shower roses, tap aerators, tap timers and dual flush toilets;

·   Rebates for the purchase of water-efficient front-loading washing machines; and

·   Cash rebates for part or all of the access charge component of the water bill.

 

Prior to the adoption of such programs, it is recommended the LWU undertake an incidence analysis to identify the likely number of vulnerable customers adversely affected and the likely impacts of each option on the customers and the LWU’s revenue.

 

It is important for LWUs to develop appropriate measures along the above lines for vulnerable customers to maintain social equity, while providing appropriate pricing signals to encourage all customers to avoid waste and to use water efficiently.”

 

In relation to alternate methods to assist the Nambucca Heads Island Golf Club without altering Council’s adopted fees and charges, in 2006 the Club’s Secretary/Manager made an enquiry about the possibility of providing the Golf Club with an alternate supply of recycled water or storm water in lieu of using the potable water supply.

 

The provision of recycled effluent would require, at a minimum, the provision of a treated effluent reticulation line from the Council’s sewerage treatment plant north of Nambucca Heads to Stuart Island, a straight line distance of approximately 4 kilometres.  A reservoir on Stuart Island or close to Stuart Island would also be required to store the treated effluent as in dry periods it would likely be irrigated at a faster rate than its supply.  Besides the above costs there would also be operating costs in pumping and chlorination.

 

At the time, the advice of Council’s Manager Water & Sewerage was that it would be uneconomic to provide recycled water and there has been no change in circumstances to suggest this assessment would be any different in 2015.  At the very least a grant would be required to cover all of the capital works required to deliver the recycled effluent.

 

As at 30 September 2016, the Club owed the Council $38,387.26 for its water consumption and also $7,000 in unpaid rental on its crown lands licence for the golf course proper (the Club and car park is contained on land owned by the Club).

 

In response to the request for advice on alternate methods to assist the Club without altering Council’s adopted fees and charges, it would seem imperative that the Club identify opportunities to reduce its consumption of potable water.  This could include identifying alternative water sources; reconstructing the greens so they are more water efficient; by reducing the number of greens; or a combination of these options.  The Club’s long standing financial problems suggest that a “write off” of their current debt or other direct financial assistance would only provide temporary respite and therefore is not in the Council’s financial interests.

 

Accordingly it is recommended that Council offer the Club $ for $ assistance up to $50,000 for the employment of competent engineering or specialist golf course consultants to provide a range of costed options to reduce its reliance on the town water supply.

 

However after a year of discussion and review, the Council does need to take steps in relation to the Club’s outstanding balance.  It will be appreciated that Council staff have to deal with many ratepayers who face financial hardship and who may fit the definition of “vulnerable customers”.  In general terms these customers have not been afforded the latitude provided to the Nambucca Heads Island Golf Club and by now would have been subject to the imposition of a water restrictor for a smaller overdue balance which remained unpaid over a shorter term.

 

Accordingly it is recommended that the Nambucca Heads Island Golf Club be provided with one month to enter into an arrangement with Council staff for the payment of their outstanding water, sewerage and Crown Lands licence charges.  Any agreement is to ensure their outstanding balance reduces over time.

 

It is also proposed that Council continue not to charge interest on the outstanding balance but in the event there is default on the agreement, that Council staff be authorised to apply a water restrictor to the premises without further notice.

 

 

CONSULTATION:

 

There has been consultation with Council’s rates staff.  Councillor Bob Morrison also forwarded the following email on 30 August 2016.

 

Michael,

 

I have attached two documents that I would like included in Councils files.

 

1.    A letter to the editor 31 July 2016 concerning the golf clubs water problems and Councils consideration of the matter.

2.    A letter of appreciation for my efforts on the Golf Clubs behalf providing some useful and informative comments.

 

I submit both these documents in the hope that the new Council will give due regard to the importance of the Golf club to our community and to appreciate the tireless efforts of the volunteers that have put their heart and expertise into running such a community organisation.   Their reward being the satisfaction of helping the community which they do without reservation.

 

It would be appreciated if this email can be circulated to the new elected Councillors.

 

Thank you.

 

Bob Morrison

 

The two documents referred to by Mr Morrison are attached.

 

 

SUSTAINABILITY ASSESSMENT:

 

Environment

 

There are no implications for the environment.

 

Social

 

The financial sustainability of the various Clubs’ in the Nambucca Valley is an on-going issue.  As operating costs rise, patronage has to increase to cover fixed and recurrent costs.  The anecdotal evidence is that succeeding generations are less supportive of the network of sporting and social clubs as volunteers or as patrons.  This is not surprising given the generational shifts in mobility; sporting interests; the shift to a 7 day per week economy; work/life balance; forms of social networking and the like.

 

Economic

 

It is agreed that the Island Golf Club is a major tourist attraction for the Nambucca Valley.  Notwithstanding Nambucca Shire Council is not in a financial position to provide an operating subsidy for all of its major tourist attractions.

 

Risk

 

There are two risks to Council.  Firstly, the Council may become an unsecured creditor in the event that the Club is placed in administration.  Secondly, if the Club is placed in administration and is deemed unable to continue to operate as a golf course, then the Council and community will have lost a well-known tourist attraction.

 

 

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS:

 

Direct and indirect impact on current and future budgets

 

The Nambucca Heads Island Golf Club has an arrears in charges of $?

 

Source of fund and any variance to working funds

 

At this stage there is no impact on working funds.

 

Service level changes and resourcing/staff implications

 

At this stage there is no significant impact on service levels or resourcing/staff implications.

 

 

Attachments:

1

31556/2015 - Request for Council's assistance

 

2

34063/2016 - Nambucca Heads Island Golf Club email

 

3

34345/2016 - Cr Morrison - letter to editor

 

4

34645/2016 - Cr Morrison - Letter of Thanks

 

  


Ordinary Council Meeting - 13 October 2016

Outstanding Water Account

 


 


Ordinary Council Meeting - 13 October 2016

Outstanding Water Account

 


 


Ordinary Council Meeting - 13 October 2016

Outstanding Water Account

 


 


Ordinary Council Meeting - 13 October 2016

Outstanding Water Account

 


Ordinary Council Meeting                                                                                               13 October 2016

General Manager

ITEM 9.6      SF2025            131016         Joint Organisations - Getting the boundaries right

 

AUTHOR/ENQUIRIES:    Michael Coulter, General Manager         

 

Summary:

 

An Office of Local Government consultation paper contains suggested boundaries for all Joint Organisations, including a North Coast Joint Organisation comprising Port Macquarie-Hastings Council, Kempsey Shire Council, Nambucca Shire Council, Bellingen Shire Council, Coffs Harbour City Council, and Clarence Valley Council.  The discussion paper says that the proposed boundaries are, “designed to be a basis for further discussion and consultation”.

 

There is nothing in the consultation paper which affects a resolution of Council on 30 June 2016 which was based on membership of a North Coast Joint Organisation whose boundaries represent a distinct community of interest based around Coffs Harbour as a strong regional centre.

 

The only additional consideration arises out of a possible push to form a single North Coast Joint Organisation comprised of the proposed North Coast and Northern Rivers Joint Organisations.

 

 

Recommendation:

 

1        That Council express its preferences for the boundaries of the proposed North Coast Joint Organisation as being:

 

a)       Most Preferred – as initially recommended and proposed being Nambucca Shire Council, Bellingen Shire Council, Coffs Harbour City Council and Clarence Valley Council.

 

b)       Less Preferred – as currently proposed being Port Macquarie-Hastings Council, Kempsey Shire Council, Nambucca Shire Council, Bellingen Shire Council, Coffs Harbour City Council and Clarence Valley Council.

 

c)       Least Preferred – an amalgamation of the proposed North Coast Joint Organisation and Northern Rivers Joint Organisation into a single Joint Organisation

 

 

OPTIONS:

 

Council has the option of whether or not it makes a submission.

 

Whilst a number of reports to Council have expressed a range of concerns about the formation and operation of Joint Organisations, the approach taken has been to engage in the consultation based on the fact that the Joint Organisations will be legislated regardless of this Council’s views.

 

Council could opt not to make a submission in response to the latest consultation from the OLG and await the outcome of the investigation by the AEC consulting group.

 

 

DISCUSSION:

 

The Council received the attached consultation paper from the Office of Local Government on 16 September.  An accompanying email advises that Councils, Regional Organisations of Councils and Pilot Joint Organisations are invited to make submissions by the closing date of 5pm on Thursday 27 October by email to jointorganisations@olg.nsw.gov.au.  Submissions may also be posted to Joint Organisations, Office of Local Government, Locked Bag 3015 Nowra NSW 2541.

 

For the benefit of new Councillors it should be noted that the NSW Government has decreed that all Councils in NSW will belong to a Joint Organisation whose three core functions will be:

 

·           Regional strategic planning and priority setting

·           Intergovernmental collaboration

·           Regional leadership and advocacy

 

Other decisions which have been made by the State Government are that the Joint Organisation Board will comprise one representative from each Council, each with one vote and that the Joint Organisations will be required to employ an Executive Officer, with the equivalent capabilities and at an equivalent level to a General Manager.

 

The Council has already made a number of submissions in relation to the proposed formation of Joint Organisations, with the most recent decision from Council’s meeting on 30 June 2016 being attached.

 

It will be noted that the consultation paper contains suggested boundaries for all Joint Organisations, including a North Coast Joint Organisation comprising Port Macquarie-Hastings Council, Kempsey Shire Council, Nambucca Shire Council, Bellingen Shire Council, Coffs Harbour City Council, and Clarence Valley Council.  The discussion paper says that the proposed boundaries are, “designed to be a basis for further discussion and consultation”.

 

The new Council should be aware that the proposed boundary for the North Coast Joint Organisation differs from that originally proposed by the Independent Local Government Review Panel.  That Panel proposed a North Coast Joint Organisation comprising Nambucca Shire Council, Bellingen Shire Council, Coffs Harbour City Council and Clarence Valley Council.

 

There was to be a Mid North Coast Council comprising Great Lakes, Gloucester, Greater Taree, Port Macquarie-Hastings and Kempsey Councils.  However Great Lakes Council at their request was permitted to join with the Hunter pilot Joint Organisation and with the subsequent amalgamation of Great Lakes, Gloucester and Greater Taree Councils to form the Mid-Coast Council, it would seem that the State Government is sanctioning their continuation with the proposed Hunter JO.  This has left Port Macquarie-Hastings and Kempsey Councils with less capacity to form their own JO and hence the suggested new JO boundary effectively stretching from the Camden Haven in the south to Iluka in the north.

 

At a recent meeting of Mid North Coast Regional Organisation of Councils (MIDROC) General Managers, it was decided to prepare a submission to investigate the inclusion of the proposed Northern Rivers Joint Organisation with the North Coast Joint Organisation to form a single coastal joint organisation stretching from the Camden Haven in the south, north to the Queensland border.  The AEC consulting group has now been engaged to undertake this investigation.

 

It will be apparent from these decisions that the process of forming joint organisations has been flawed to the extent that local parochial interests are affecting the initial recommendations of the Independent Local Government Review Panel.  The Panel carefully considered its recommended JO boundaries based on the following factors:

 

·           Manageable geographic area and suitable scale for strategic planning

·           Regional or sub-regional communities of interest reflected in current arrangements, including existing ROCs and County Councils

·           Alignment as far as possible with key State and federal agencies for strategic planning purposes

·           Strong socio-economic links identified through the Panel’s “cluster factor” analysis

·           Viability of a regional alliance of water utilities (at least 10,000 connections)

·           A regional centre with existing or potential strategic capacity to anchor the Joint Organisation and to assist smaller member councils where required.

 

The possible inclusion of Port Macquarie-Hastings and Kempsey in the North Coast Joint Organisation was anticipated by the previous Council, with Council’s resolution on 30 June 2016 providing as follows:

 

1        That Council make a submission to the Office of Local Government (OLG) regarding the Joint Organisation (JO) Model. 

 

·   That the submission be limited to recommending the boundaries of the JO in which Nambucca Shire will be included.

 

·   That the recommendation be that Nambucca Shire is comfortable with membership of the North Coast JO and feels that those boundaries represent a distinct community of interested based around Coffs Harbour as a strong regional centre. 

 

·   However as it is now evident the JO will take on many of the functions of the current Regional Organisation and that the cost of being part of a JO will far exceed the cost of participating in MIDROC; Council would be agreeable to the alternative of being part of a larger JO, comprising the combination of the North Coast and Mid North Coast JO’s. 

 

·   This approximates the membership of MIDROC, an organisation that has functioned successfully for a long time.  Such a membership would include more than one regional centre and more than one corresponding community of interest, Council does not consider this to be a significant hurdle and argues that the topography, demographics and regional issues are more alike than they are different and the combined Joint Organisation would be well placed to deliver the proposed core functions.

 

2        That Council support initially limiting the new JO to the core functions as prescribed by the NSW Government and structuring the new entity so it can effectively deliver these core functions at the minimum cost.

 

There is nothing in the consultation paper which affects the resolution of 30 June 2016.

 

The only additional consideration arises out of a possible push to form a single North Coast Joint Organisation comprised of the proposed North Coast and Northern Rivers Joint Organisations.  Whilst this possibility is to be the subject of a detailed investigation by the AEC consulting group, prima facie it is difficult to see such a large JO satisfying the criterion that it be able to demonstrate clear community of interest between member councils and regions.  The other obvious concern is that it would be so large as to create diseconomies in management with travel distances and the involvement of an increased number of councils substantially increasing administration costs.

 

In the absence of any new considerations which might come out of the AEC investigation, the following is proposed by way of response to the discussion paper from the Office of Local Government.

 

That Nambucca Shire Council express its preferences for the boundaries of the proposed North Coast Joint Organisation as being:

 

Most Preferred – as initially recommended and proposed being Nambucca Shire Council, Bellingen Shire Council, Coffs Harbour City Council and Clarence Valley Council.

 

Less Preferred – as currently proposed being Port Macquarie-Hastings Council, Kempsey Shire Council, Nambucca Shire Council, Bellingen Shire Council, Coffs Harbour City Council and Clarence Valley Council.

 

Least Preferred – an amalgamation of the proposed North Coast Joint Organisation and Northern Rivers Joint Organisation into a single Joint Organisation

 

 

CONSULTATION:

 

There has been discussion amongst the General Managers’ of the Mid North Coast Regional Organisation of Councils.  The matter has been discussed with the Mayor and Assistant General Manager Corporate Services.

 

The Council has received the attached media release from the Member for Oxley which supports the creation of the Joint Organisations.  According to the media release Joint Organisations are a major part of the NSW Government’s plan to strengthen local government and revitalise regional NSW by giving all councils and communities a stronger voice.  The media release also refers to the proposed Joint Organisations improving the delivery of important services that regional communities need, such as roads and bridges.  That JO’s will improve the delivery of roads and bridges is welcome news.

 

SUSTAINABILITY ASSESSMENT:

 

Environment

There are no implications for the environment.

 

Social

The boundaries of the Joint Organisation, whatever they may be, are unlikely to have any social implications.

 

Economic

There are no significant economic implications.

 

Risk

There are significant risks in the formation of Joint Organisations, including the duplication of effort and resources and the consequent waste of ratepayers’ funds in establishing what is effectively a fourth tier of government.  These risks have been previously reported and discussed and have been the subject of previous submissions to the Office of Local Government.

 

Other risks in the establishment of the Joint Organisations are that the Government may use them as an opportunity to follow through with previous Inquiry recommendations (Armstrong/Gellatly) to amalgamate local water utilities.  As water and sewerage operations comprise about one third of the Council activity, such action would substantially weaken the capacity of Nambucca Shire Council and its financial sustainability to remain as a separate local government entity.

 

Of course the other discussion point has been that the Joint Organisations may be a platform for a further round of Council amalgamations at some future time.

 

Whatever the reasons (stated or otherwise) for the establishment of Joint Organisations, the NSW Government has decided they will proceed.  As such this Council’s approach has been to engage with the State Government in good faith so as to ensure the Joint Organisations have the best chance of succeeding in undertaking their core functions and value adding to the existing system of government.

 

 

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS:

 

Direct and indirect impact on current and future budgets

At this stage the budgetary impact is unknown.

 

Source of fund and any variance to working funds

There is unlikely to be any impact on working funds as the required funding for the operation of the Joint Organisations will be incorporated in a subsequent operational plan (budget) with grant funding being provided to allow the organisation to commence in the interim.

 

Service level changes and resourcing/staff implications

At this stage the implications for resourcing and staff are unknown.

 

Attachments:

1

32044/2016 - Joint Organisations - Getting the boundaries right

 

2

22762/2016 - MINUTE Joint Organisations - 30/06/2016

 

3

32200/2016 - Joint Organisations - Getting the boundaries right - media release

 

  


Ordinary Council Meeting - 13 October 2016

Joint Organisations - Getting the boundaries right

 


 


 


 


Ordinary Council Meeting - 13 October 2016

Joint Organisations - Getting the boundaries right

 

 

For Action

Council

30/06/2016

TO: General Manager (Michael Coulter)

 

                                                                                                                                                                

 

Subject:

Joint Organisations - Operational Arrangements

Target Date:

30/06/2016

Notes:

 

Trim Reference

SF2025 (20897/2016)

                                                                                                                                                                    

283/16 RESOLVED:        (Ainsworth/Finlayson)

 

1        That Council make a submission to the Office of Local Government (OLG) regarding the Joint Organisation (JO) Model. 

 

·   That the submission be limited to recommending the boundaries of the JO in which Nambucca Shire will be included.

 

·   That the recommendation be that Nambucca Shire is comfortable with membership of the North Coast JO and feels that those boundaries represent a distinct community of interested based around Coffs Harbour as a strong regional centre. 

 

·   However as it is now evident the JO will take on many of the functions of the current Regional Organisation and that the cost of being part of a JO will far exceed the cost of participating in MIDROC; Council would be agreeable to the alternative of being part of a larger JO, comprising the combination of the North Coast and Mid North Coast JO’s. 

 

·   This approximates the membership of MIDROC, an organisation that has functioned successfully for a long time.  Such a membership would include more than one regional centre and more than one corresponding community of interest, Council does not consider this to be a significant hurdle and argues that the topography, demographics and regional issues are more alike than they are different and the combined Joint Organisation would be well placed to deliver the proposed core functions.

 

2        That Council support initially limiting the new JO to the core functions as prescribed by the NSW Government and structuring the new entity so it can effectively deliver these core functions at the minimum cost.

 

 

 Open Item in Minutes                                                                                                                                

 

This action sheet has been automatically produced by the Minute Secretary using InfoCouncil, the agenda and minutes database.
Please forward updated action sheet to the Governance Unit (by email or hard copy post) once completed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


ACTION TAKEN BY OFFICER

 

ONGOING / COMPLETED

Completion date: ____________

 

(Please update once item is actually completed)

 

Details:


Ordinary Council Meeting - 13 October 2016

Joint Organisations - Getting the boundaries right

 


 


 


Ordinary Council Meeting                                                                                               13 October 2016

General Manager's Report

ITEM 9.7      RF353              131016         Lower Buckrabendinni Road - Requests to Extend Road Seal

 

AUTHOR/ENQUIRIES:    Michael Coulter, General Manager         

 

Summary:

 

Council has received representations to extend the road seal on Lower Buckrabendinni Road.

 

There have been requests to Council and alleged commitments by Council to extend the seal since 1981. 

 

In 2016 there has been further requests and representations including from the Member for Oxley.  These requests and representations culminated in several meetings involving council staff and residents also a meeting involving residents with the Mayor and General Manager.  At a meeting with residents on 19 July 2016 it was agreed to undertake the investigations necessary to determine an accurate costing for an extension of the seal to Deer Hill Road, a distance of 3.45 km.

 

The estimated total cost with a 10% contingency to extend the existing seal by 3.45km with a 5m wide two coat bitumen sealed pavement is $390,424.

 

 

Recommendation:

 

1        Council note the estimate of $390,424 to extend the seal on Lower Buckrabendinni      Road by 3.45km to the intersection of Deer Hill Road.

 

2        The residents of Lower Buckrabendinni Road be requested to confirm their offer of     $131,100 towards the capital cost of sealing this section of road.

 

3        That Council consider extending the seal on Lower Buckrabendinni Road by 3.45km to the intersection of Deer Hill Road as part of its budget deliberations for the 2017/2018 Operational Plan.

 

4        That the Member for Oxley be thanked for her representations in relation to the matter and be asked to secure funding from the State Government to assist with funding the extension of the seal.

 

 

OPTIONS:

 

There are a range of options.  The Council could decide not to extend the sealed pavement or to extend it for a lesser distance than the requested 3.45km.  The Council could also decide to proceed with the project with or without a contribution from residents.  If Council was to decide to proceed with the project it would be making a commitment in its 2017/2018 Operational Plan without having the opportunity to consider competing demands for the funds.

 

DISCUSSION:

 

Council has received representations to extend the road seal on Lower Buckrabendinni Road.  A copy of most of the recent correspondence in relation to the matter is attached.

 

The Mayor and General Manager also met with residents on 19 July 2016 and it was agreed to undertake the investigations necessary to determine an accurate costing for an extension of the seal to Deer Hill Road, a distance of 3.45 km.

 

At that meeting the residents proposed providing 50% of the necessary funding to extend the road seal based on what they nominated as the $380,000 cost of sealing 5km of North Arm Road ($180,000 from Council plus $200,000 from Natural Disaster funding for flood damage).  This is the equivalent of $76 per lineal metre (full cost) and $38 per lineal metre (half cost).  Applying this offer to the 3,450 metres of Lower Buckrabendinni Road which they are seeking to be sealed would mean a contribution by the residents of $131,100.

 

Council’s engineering staff have now completed an investigation of the cost of extending the seal on Lower Buckrabendinni Road.  The investigations have included surveys of the existing gravel pavement to determine its thickness and composition.  An estimate was then prepared based on a 5m wide two coat bitumen seal being the accepted standard for rural road construction.  The estimate is based on the road being constructed along the existing pavement alignment.

 

The cost estimate has been broken down to three distinct sections along the road which have a different treatment attributed to the available gravel pavement.  A contingency of 10% has been included in the estimates to cover unforeseen matters and/or potential wet weather as well as a 5% contingency for supervision.  The estimates by section are as follows:

 

Section 1 – 850m - $53,550

Please note that this section between the end of the bitumen and 200m past the end of the dust seal pavement has adequate gravel and could be trimmed, shaped and sealed.

 

Section 2- 1,900m - $186,770

This section is from the end of the existing dust seal to the Sandy Crossing bridge abutment.

 

Section 3 – 700m - $97,528

This is the section from the Sandy Crossing bridge abutment to Deer Hill Road.

 

The total cost with contingency is $390,424 for 3.45km of 5m wide two coat bitumen sealed pavement.

 

A detailed “break down” of the estimate is attached.

 

A number of arguments have been put forward in relation to the cost/benefit of sealing roads.  It is agreed that there are benefits in terms of reduced vehicle damage, shorter travel times, more productive pasture, less sediment runoff, reduced domestic cleaning etc.  But it is not agreed that in general terms unsealed roads cost the Council more to maintain than sealed roads.  The financial evidence is the reverse.

 

A snap shot of the costs of maintaining unsealed and sealed roads is provided in Council’s 2016/2017 Operational Plan (budget).  It provides an expenditure of $1,009,700 on the grading and re-sheeting of 345kms of unsealed roads compared to $3,101,900 on the maintenance and rehabilitation of an almost equivalent 352kms of sealed road network.

 

Accordingly if a Council is struggling to meet its long term asset management obligations (which this Council is), significant extensions of the sealed road network is not a sound financial strategy.  Of course balanced against this is the fact that in terms of resident satisfaction unsealed roads are the worst ranked of the services provided by Council.  In the 2016 customer satisfaction survey among the six council provided services scoring less than the neutral satisfaction ranking, roads were the worst-ranked of the services with unsealed roads being the “worst of the worst” scoring 2.49 and with sealed roads scoring 2.65.  The ranking system uses a scale of 1-5 where 1 = very dissatisfied, 3 = neutral and 5 = very satisfied.

 

In considering requests to seal roads there are also some policy/equity considerations which Council may wish to consider.  Recently Council extended the seal on Williams Hill Road north from the Taylors Arm Road intersection by several hundred metres on the basis that the work was 100% funded by the adjoining property owner.  As referred to in the report, Council also extended the seal on North Arm Road by approximately 5km without any direct capital contribution from any residents.  However the project was assisted by $200,000 in flood damage funding being more than 50% of the cost.  The offer of a capital contribution for Lower Buckrabendinni Road (if confirmed) would be for approximately 33% of the capital cost.  Clearly the different approaches to co-contributions for the capital works might be criticised for being inequitable.

 

Besides the financial issue for Council in extending its sealed road network, it is likely that sealing roads will also increase property values as a consequence of reduced vehicle damage, shorter travel times, more productive pasture etc.  This is another argument in favour of seeking co-contributions.

 

CONSULTATION:

 

There has been consultation with the Assistant General Manager Engineering Services.

 

SUSTAINABILITY ASSESSMENT:

 

Environment

As discussed in the report sealing roads does reduce sediment runoff and dust.

 

Social

Unsealed roads are a significant source of complaint, particularly during dry periods.  They are rated as the worst of all services provided by Council.

 

Economic

Although difficult to quantify, sealing roads does provide economic benefits with less vehicle damage and more productive pasture.

 

Risk

The risks outlined in the report principally relate to Council’s financial sustainability.  Approximately 50% of Council’s road network is unsealed and if a precedent is created whereby there are significant extensions to the sealed network then this will have a long term adverse impact on this Council’s financial sustainability.

 

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS:

 

Direct and indirect impact on current and future budgets

 

The capital cost of the requested work is identified as $390,424 for 3.45km of 5m wide two coat bitumen sealed pavement.  The on-going maintenance cost of that sealed pavement will in general terms be 200% to 300% more than the cost of an unsealed pavement.  Whilst this additional maintenance cost for 3.45km of pavement is not material to Council’s budget, if the process were to be replicated for 50 or more kilometres it would have a material adverse impact on future budgets.

 

Source of fund and any variance to working funds

 

It is not appropriate for Council to consider a variation to its 2016/2017 budget to undertake such a large capital project as extending the road sealing by 3.45km.  The Council should consider the proposal as part of its deliberations for its Operational Plan for 2017/2018.

 

Service level changes and resourcing/staff implications

 

There has been expenditure of staff time in investigating the depth and composition of the existing gravel pavement and in preparing estimates.  There has also been the expenditure of time in attending meetings and responding to correspondence.

 

Attachments:

1

34593/2016 - Lower Buckrabendinni Road Estimate

 

2

19183/2016 - Request for information

 

3

19464/2016 - Complaint regarding condition of Lower Buckrabendinni Road

 

4

19686/2016 - Sealing Of Lower Buckrabendinni Road

 

5

19753/2016 - Representation by Melinda Pavey on behalf T, O & O Baldwin

 

6

20136/2016 - Representations regarding Lower Buckrabendinni Road

 

7

22733/2016 - Response relating to lower Buckrabendinni Road

 

8

22952/2016 - Complaint regarding condition of Lower Buckrabendinni Road

 

  


Ordinary Council Meeting - 13 October 2016

Lower Buckrabendinni Road - Requests to Extend Road Seal

 


Ordinary Council Meeting - 13 October 2016

Lower Buckrabendinni Road - Requests to Extend Road Seal

 


 


Ordinary Council Meeting - 13 October 2016

Lower Buckrabendinni Road - Requests to Extend Road Seal

 


Ordinary Council Meeting - 13 October 2016

Lower Buckrabendinni Road - Requests to Extend Road Seal

 

 

 

Enquiries to:       Mr Michael Coulter

Phone:              02) 6568 0200

Email:                michael.coulter@nambucca.nsw.gov.au

Mobile:              0409 153 788

Our Ref:            RF353

Your Ref:                    16259:PS

 

 

8 June 2016

 

 

 

Ms Anne Gillin

Nambucca Valley Legal

PO Box 291

NAMBUCCA HEADS   NSW   2448

 

 

Dear Ms Gillin

 

SEALING OF LOWER BUCKRABENDINNI ROAD

 

I refer to your letter addressed to the Mayor, Cr Rhonda Hoban, dated 1 June 2016 on behalf of Terry Baldwin and his parents Owen and Olive Baldwin.

 

As your letter requests information on operational matters, the Mayor requested that I investigate and reply to you.  She has your letter together with this response.

 

I note your clients propose to take the matter to the Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development to seek funding.  You seek advice from Council as to its position in respect of sealing the road and specifically whether Council is prepared to carry out the works to seal the relevant section of Buckrabendinni Road and if so when Council proposes to commence the works. 

 

You request Council supply the following information:

 

i         Cost of maintaining the first section of the road which has bitumen seal

ii        Cost of maintaining the second section of the road which is gravel

iii       Costs of putting a bitumen seal on the gravel road.

 

As you allude to there has been considerable correspondence and discussions involving the Baldwin family and Council staff over many years in response to their requests for the extension of the seal by approximately three kilometres.

 

In response to your specific requests, Council’s asset management systems are unable to attribute long term average maintenance costs to particular sections of road.

 

In general terms I can compare the costs of maintaining unsealed and sealed roads by reference to Council’s Draft 2016/17 Operational Plan.  The Draft Plan provides for an expenditure of $1,009,700 on the grading and resheeting of 345 kms of unsealed rural roads compared to $3,101,900 on the maintenance and rehabilitation of an almost equivalent 352 kms of sealed road network.

 


 

2

 

Ms Anne Gillin

8 June 2016

 

 

If you do not accept Council’s figures which indicate the cost of maintaining a sealed road network is far greater than the cost of maintaining an unsealed road network I invite you to contact any engineer involved with road maintenance or asset management and obtain their opinion.

 

As well as the cost of the road network, Council is also responsible for the 170 bridges which are located on the network.  As it stands with the imminent handover of the liability for the existing Pacific Highway from the RMS to Council, Council’s overall financial position will prevent it from committing to the extension of the existing seal along Lower Buckrabendinni Road.  I am unable to say if or when Council will ever have the necessary finance to do this work.

 

If Council was to receive additional tied capital funding from the State or Federal Government to extend its sealed road network, our approach would be to prioritise the expenditure according to the traffic volume and the number of residents affected by dust.  I am unable to say where Lower

Buckrabendinni road would sit on a such a priority list.

 

A cost estimate for extending the existing bitumen seal approximately 3 kms to Sandy’s Crossing is estimated to be 3,000 metres x 6 metres = 18,000 m2 @ $50 per square metre = $900,000.  This estimate is based on recent work undertaken by Council in extending the seal on Williams Hill Road.  This work was paid for by the adjoining property owner.  A more refined costing would require significant investigation into the amount of salvageable gravel on the road, a determination of the amount of gravel which would need to be imported, the adequacy of the existing drainage arrangements, and survey information concerning the location of the alignment compared to the reservation.

 

Notwithstanding everything stated above, if the State and Federal Governments offered capital assistance specifically for the extension of the bitumen seal on Lower Buckrabendinni road, Council would be pleased to consider a one third contribution toward the cost.

 

I trust this information satisfies your enquiry.

 

Yours faithfully

 

 

Description: signature mcoulter

 

Michael Coulter

GENERAL MANAGER

 

MAC:ms

 

cc      Mayor

          Assistant General Manager Engineering Services

          Manager Assets

 


Ordinary Council Meeting - 13 October 2016

Lower Buckrabendinni Road - Requests to Extend Road Seal

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Ordinary Council Meeting - 13 October 2016

Lower Buckrabendinni Road - Requests to Extend Road Seal

 

 

Enquiries to:       Mr Michael Coulter

Phone:              02) 6568 0200

Email:                michael.coulter@nambucca.nsw.gov.au

Mobile:              0409 153 788

Our Ref:            RF353

 

 

 

10 June 2016

 

 

 

The Hon Melinda Pavey MP

Member for Oxley

PO Box 3120

WEST KEMPSEY   NSW   2440

 

Dear Melinda

 

REPRESENTATIONS REGARDING THE EXTENSION OF THE BITUMEN SEAL ON LOWER BUCKRABENDINNI ROAD

 

Thank you for your letter of 31 May 2016 enclosing correspondence from the Baldwin family and seeking Council’s consideration and advice on what possible options may be available to Council so that the situation might be addressed by the parties involved.

 

Council has recently received similar representations and enquiries from Ms Anne Gillin from Nambucca Valley Legal on behalf of the Baldwin family.

 

Please find enclosed a reply I have provided to Ms Gillin which indicates Council’s position.

 

By way of summary, if the State and/or Federal Governments offered capital assistance specifically for the extension of the bitumen seal on Lower Buckrabendinni Road, Council would be pleased to consider a one third contribution toward the cost.  Subject to detailed investigation a working estimate to extend the bitumen seal approximately three kilometres to Sandy’s Crossing is $900,000.

 

I note there are some assertions in the letter from Mr Baldwin as to what rural residents want.  For your information I have enclosed a copy of a recent customer satisfaction survey undertaken by Jetty Research for Council.  You will note on page 7 that sealed roads are rated as of higher importance and lower satisfaction compared to unsealed roads rated as lower importance and lower satisfaction.

 

I am aware that Council’s Assistant General Manager Engineering Services (Mr Paul Gallagher) has met with Mr Terry Baldwin to discuss the matter.

 

I trust this information is of assistance.

 

Yours faithfully

 

 

 

Michael Coulter

GENERAL MANAGER

 

MAC:ms

Enc      Copy of letter to Ms Anne Gillin dated 8 June 2016

             Copy of Customer Satisfaction Survey


Ordinary Council Meeting - 13 October 2016

Lower Buckrabendinni Road - Requests to Extend Road Seal

 

Enquiries to:     Clint Fitzsummons

Phone No:       02 6568 0253

Email:              clint.fitzsummons@nambucca.nsw.gov.au

Our Ref:          RF353

Your Ref:        

 

 

 

4 July 2016

 

 

 

Mrs T Griffiths

PO Box 344

BOWRAVILLE  NSW  2449

 

 

Dear Mrs Griffiths

 

CONDITION OF Lower Buckrabendinni Road Bowraville

 

In response to your letter dated 28 May 2016 regarding the condition of Lower Buckrabendinni Road.

 

The extension of the seal to the dairy on Lower Buckrabendinni Road is estimated to cost in the vicinity of $900,000 and is outside Council’s budget.  Should funding be sourced from other tiers of Government, Council may consider a contribution.

 

Council has implemented a new methodology of maintenance grading, utilising a water cart and Roller.  This methodology has improved the longevity of the road between grades.  The results in other areas of the Shire have proved encouraging; unfortunately the new process is taking longer to get around the shire in the first instance.  As a sidenote, Council is also planning to trial new products that are added to the water cart, which if successful and economically viable, may also improve the longevity of a maintenance grade and reduce dust in the future.

 

The Council Grader will be in the Lower Buckrabendinni area within the next month, weather dependant, to address the condition issues on Lower Buckrabendinni Road.

 

Should you wish to discuss this matter further, please do not hesitate to contact Mr Clint Fitzsummons, Manager Assets of Council’s Engineering Services Department on 6568 0253.

 

Yours faithfully

 

 

 

 

Clint Fitzsummons

MANAGER ASSETS

 

CJF:tb

 


Ordinary Council Meeting - 13 October 2016

Lower Buckrabendinni Road - Requests to Extend Road Seal

 


 


Ordinary Council Meeting                                                                                               13 October 2016

General Manager's Report

ITEM 9.8      SF2251            131016         Visitor Information Centre Leasing and Tourism Update

 

AUTHOR/ENQUIRIES:    Coral Hutchinson, Manager Community Development; Michael Coulter, General Manager         

 

Summary:

 

This is a follow up report following a number of decisions regarding the future of the Visitor Information Centre (VIC), a tourism presence at the BP Highway Service Centre at Nambucca Heads and the future focus of the Tourism Co-ordinator position.

 

In the past, two of the key ways Council supported tourism was to operate a Visitor Information Centre and to undertake bookings for industry operators.  In a changing environment where on-line bookings and digital marketing have become the norm, Council needs to be more proactive and take information to the visitor how and when they want it, instead of hoping the visitor comes to the information.  Hence the move to becoming more strategic.

 

Another important reason Council has decided to change way it supports Tourism is that the existing model of VIC is becoming out-dated and will be adversely affected by the imminent relocation of the Pacific Highway.

 

 

Recommendation:

 

1        That Council note the receipt of an Expression of Interest for the lease of the Visitor Information Centre by Nambucca Valley Craft and Art Incorporated, also noting that the proposal includes the provision of visitor information.

 

2        That Council’s Mayor, General Manager and Manager Business Development be authorised to negotiate a lease or licence with Nambucca Valley Craft and Art Incorporated for use of the Nambucca Valley Visitor Information Centre.

 

3        That Council note some of the priority areas for moving forward, including incorporating a new direction in the Integrated Planning and Reporting processes via the Community Strategic Plan and Delivery Program review.

 

4        That Council support the request by Macksville Ex-Services Club to establish a Level 3 Visitor Information Centre, noting that this is essentially “in kind” support.

 

 

 

OPTIONS:

 

Council has the option to adopt the recommendations or make different resolutions however it is preferred that the matter not be further deferred.  It will noted there has been numerous reports to the previous council on the subject and any changes in operations need to be implemented and “bedded down” before the Christmas and January school holidays.

 

DISCUSSION:

 

BACKGROUND

 

There have been numerous reports on tourism and the future of the Visitor Information Centre, going back over 6 or 7 years.  For those interested in more of the background, reports are available on Council’s website as far back as 2008, however look for reports to Council on: 27 September 2012, 12 December 2012, 10 July 2013, 14 August 2013, 11 December 2014, 12 February 2015, and 17 March 2016.

 

KEY ISSUES IN SUMMARY

 

For some time, Nambucca Shire Council has been grappling with changes in the tourism industry as travellers use more digital or online approaches to planning and enjoying their holidays.  In addition, being “Fit for the Future”, the relocation of the Pacific Highway and the model of operation at the current Visitor Information Centre (VIC) has prompted Council to examine exactly how it is supporting tourism as an industry.

 

In recent years, Visitor Information Centres have come under scrutiny for their relevance and value as the current VIC model was developed in a time before mobile technology, online bookings etc.  Various research shows that the model of operation needs to change.  Face-to-face service is valued but there needs to be more diverse approaches.  Further, Nambucca Shire Council has been working towards more strategic support for the industry as a whole and moving away from direct service delivery. 

 

As most people are aware Nambucca Shire Council has been declared Fit for the Future and it is a priority that Council and staff work towards remaining financially fit.  Therefore Council has been examining all aspects of its budget, including tourism, to ensure the best value for the ratepayer.  Whilst the Council has many pressing demands for its limited funds, it is expected that Council's financial commitment to tourism marketing and promotion of approximately $163,000 per annum will remain.  Given the changes to the Highway and in technology, the deliberations are about the most effective application of these funds. 

 

The relocation of the Pacific Highway will reduce traffic volumes on the existing Pacific Highway at the Riverside Drive intersection from approximately 11,000 vehicles per day to 5,500 vehicles per day.  The vehicles remaining on the existing Pacific Highway, which is to be renamed Giinagay Way, will be almost entirely local traffic.  If the experience at Urunga is anything to go by, visitation to the current VIC will drop significantly.  Already, changing research and booking practices by visitors is impacting - the number of enquiries to the VIC at Nambucca Heads decreased by 19.5% in 2015-2016.

 

Council has also looked into the model of VIC it is operating.  There is significant direct support to the Nambucca Valley Tourism Association Inc. (NVTA Board) and to some local operators, which has also prompted consideration of a model where Council focuses on across-industry and destination marketing.  Further, this approach separates the responsibilities of Council and the Nambucca Valley Tourism Association Incorporated, allowing each to operate independently and avoiding potential conflicts of interest, but to still collaborate.  This will be similar to how Council works with the Chambers of Commerce.  It is also worth noting, that the views of the NVTA Board and operators of tourism businesses, do not always correspond and this can put Council in a difficult position at times when the two don’t agree.

 

2016 has seen a number of Council decisions designed to move forward.  The decisions should not be wrongly interpreted as Council not supporting tourism or withdrawing support – it is a change in direction and a change in priorities. 

 

RECENT DECISIONS – UPDATE ON PROGRESS

 

A comprehensive report to Council on 12 May 2016 considered various options for the future of the VIC including renting the current VIC, leasing a space at the BP Travel (new Highway Service) Centre, co-locating visitor information with library services and locating the Tourism Co-ordinator at the Council Administration Centre for a more strategic focus.

 

The NVTA Board made a delegation to the meeting and proposed that:

 

·      Face-to-face information service delivery has to be maintained;

·      Council leases the current Visitor Information Centre (VIC) as a café with a Level 3 Visitor Information Centre included;

·      Rent space for a VIC at the New Highway Centre, shared with Bellingen;

·      Count NVTA’s 25% membership contribution into calculations, currently around $3,000 per annum;

·      Place the Tourism Co-ordinator in Macksville at the Council Administration Centre to operate from there; and

·      Make the towns of Nambucca Heads and Macksville shine in their best light after Highway upgrade completion by signage and Tourist Drive inclusion.

 

Council made the following decisions at the 12 May meeting:

 

1.   That Council call for Expressions of Interest to rent or lease the existing Visitor Information Centre, with the understanding that there would be a requirement for a small floor space to be used for the Visitor Information Centre.

 

Note:  A report to Council on 16 June asked for a rethink due to the constraints this would place on a potential business so Council resolved to call for Expressions of Interest to rent or lease the existing Visitor Information Centre, with all EOI’s to include proposals for the provision of visitor information, removing the requirement for floor space which is extremely limited. 

 

2.   That Council continue to pursue a visitor information outlet at the BP Travel Centre, including investigation of the viability of a no-cost option.

 

3.   That, should a staffed visitor information outlet be favoured at the Travel Centre, Council seek Expressions of Interest from organisations interested in operating it.

 

4.   That the Tourism Co-ordinator be permanently based at the Council Administration Centre to allow for an increased strategic focus. 

 

5.   That Council make a formal application to the Tourist Attraction Signposting Assessment Committee for the old Pacific Highway (Giinagay Way) to become a Tourist Drive.

 

Leasing the VIC.

 

Following a 6 week campaign (including 4 weeks advertising in the Mid Coast Observer, Coffs Coast Advocate and on Council’s own website plus direct advice to industry operators) during August/September, the Council has received one formal Expression of Interest (EOI) from Nambucca Valley Craft and Art Incorporated. 

 

Nambucca Valley Craft and Art Incorporated (NVCA) has around 26 members with a strong volunteer base and has been operating in the local area for 16 years.  The incorporated association is essentially a cooperative which uses its volunteer member artists and crafters to retail their locally produced work.  The high cost of rent has forced the shop to move a number of times over the years and meant a reliance on fundraising to stay afloat.  A stable, more affordable home would allow members to focus on a wider range of cultural and community activities.  The EOI proposal addresses the provision of visitor information and therefore fits with Council’s desire for tourist information to continue to be available from the site.  A wall-mounted display is proposed which can maximise the printed material available and leave maximum floor space available for the display of crafts. 

 

The proposal being considered has a number of very positive attributes which appear to cover both Council’s and the NVTA’s priorities:

 

·      A Visitor Information Centre continues to operate at the current site.

·      The dual promotion of 2 of our key industries - tourism and the creative arts.

·      A continuation of a face-to-face information service. 

·      Operates under a similar model involving volunteers and some of council’s current VIC volunteers may wish to transition to the NVCA and remain at the Centre, potentially broadening the volunteer pool and strengthening the service.

·      Hand-over can be managed to minimize impact on the customer, and be completed and be fully operational prior to summer holidays.

·      There is nothing to indicate that the Centre would not continue to meet a level of Visitor Centre Accreditation.

·      Provides an income to Council to offset the building’s operational expenses.

·      It will operate independently of Council.

 

Nambucca Valley Craft and Art Incorporated are offering Council $80 per week + GST + outgoings (which are yet to be determined and negotiated).  This is less than what Council would expect from a commercial enterprise but given the dual promotion that the NV Craft and Art will provide and the social enterprise component, together with the reasons noted above, this is considered an attractive proposition for Council.  It provides some income from the building to offset weekly costs of around $140 and fits within Council’s current budget. The organisation is also expected to provide its own Contents, Public Liability and volunteer insurances. 

 

The proposal, which appears to offer Council and the NVTA what they both are aiming for, is significant to Council as it also facilitates the move to a more strategic approach to tourism, with the community/industry providing direct visitor information services.

 

Also, the proposal would complement other tourism information outlets such as the new Travel Centre at the northern entrance to Nambucca Heads; the 3 community booths which are serviced by the NVTA (outside Nambucca Liquor, Bowraville Post Office, and Bridge Café Macksville); and the 6 Visitor Point information sites (White Albatross, Nambucca Holiday Park/Swimming Creek, Valla Beach Resort, Pelican Park, Aukaka, and Nambucca River Tourist Park). 

 

Council also may be interested to note that it has received an expression of interest from Macksville Ex-Services Club to establish a Level 3 VIC at the Club.   Its high visibility, opening hours and accessibility make it an ideal addition to the network of information outlets.  It will also interest businesses in Macksville as they prepare for post by-pass.  An early assessment indicates that the site would meet the requirements set down by Destination NSW and feedback is that approval could be obtained before the Christmas Holidays.  This report to Council is timely in that it can consider this proposal noting that the application will require Council support – in reality this is mostly a monitoring role that would be undertaken by the Tourism Co-ordinator. 

 

Note:  For those interested in “accreditation” for visitor centres, there are National Standards which are comprehensive and address all elements of a Visitor Information Centres’ operation. The Nambucca Valley VIC as it currently stands is Accredited Level 2.  An attachment outlines the differences between the (minimum) requirements of accreditation levels.  Those in the know, will be aware that there is a change in the company administering the AVIC scheme, but Destination NSW have advised that there will be no major changes to accreditation processes. 

 

Whilst it is not a café as suggested by NVTA, the lease would not prevent the organization from including this in their business model eg morning or afternoon tea; nor would prevent the sale of local food-related products.  In fact, this would be encouraged to further promote the Valley.  The lease also recognizes that the tenant may wish to offer a range of tourism-related services eg bookings for income generation.   This would be by negotiation with local providers or the NVTA Board if it decides to continue with its booking software “Bookeasy”.  There is an opportunity for both organisations to work together to achieve mutually beneficial outcomes.

 

Note:  Council has no control over this aspect of the VIC going forward.  Although Council staff and its volunteers have provided this service, the software is owned by NVTA and it is the Association which keeps the commission.   Interestingly, bookings taken at the VIC are mostly declining and bookings are not generally a key reason for visitors to use a VIC.  The latest research, a June 2016 report on Visitor Information Servicing in NSW by Tourism Research Australia shows that visits to VICs are mostly information related.  Maps of the area (53% visitors), information on attractions (51%) and local events (24%) and directions (8%) were reasons to visit a VIC.  Only 14% wanted information on or booked accommodation.  The model of operation proposed by the Craft and Art Association would appear to be well able to meet these enquiries.

 

Highway BP Service Centre – Rental of Space

 

The decision to investigate this option is largely related to the Highway diversion and the construction of the Highway Service Centre at the northern entrance to Nambucca Heads. 

 

Previous reports to Council show that this was going to be a challenge due to the commercial rent (between $30,000 and $50,000 per annum) and location of the Centre at the north of the Valley. A shared lease with Coffs Harbour and Bellingen is also not viable.  Coffs Harbour City Council is discussing moving away from this model and advised Council that it would not contribute financially.  Although Bellingen were more interested, a firm financial commitment has not been forthcoming.

 

In any case, BP has commercial interests which must be considered. Most recently, the requirements of the Centre’s commercial tenants has resulted in local government being effectively ruled out of this proposal.  Council’s Manager Business Development has explored the concept of local businesses (mainly product related) having a presence at the new Centre, however this proved beyond their financial scope given the likely rents noted above. 

 

The timing of this has also proved tricky as Council is only just considering the EOI for the current VIC.  At one point it seemed possible that should a commercial tenant be found, then this could offset a small presence at the Service Centre.

 

The main priority at the moment, given the Centre’s imminent construction, is to ensure the location of tourism brochure displays and local imagery.  There is no cost associated with either of these as they are a requirement of Roads and Maritime Services in their lease of the land. 

 

Having said all that, there may still be the opportunity to provide some direct service to travellers at peak times.  Council has asked that the door remain open on this concept as a presence could be accommodated after construction via a small booth, however still at a cost.

 

Location of the Tourism Co-ordinator

 

Previous reports which have looked into and documented the amount of time required to directly operate the current VIC show that the Tourism Co-ordinator’s 21 hours per week are spent either keeping the doors open or providing direct support to the NVTA Board.  Little if any time is available for industry-wide initiatives, destination marketing, social media, online marketing and product development – key approaches for tourism in the digital age.  Hence Council’s decision that the Co-ordinator would be based at the Council Administration Centre and that the role will become more strategic.  Promotion of the valley as a desirable tourist destination, assisting Council to provide services and infrastructure for visitors and tourists, and co-ordinating destination development and marketing initiatives for the Shire, will become the focus of the position. 

 

A tentative date for relocation was 5 September 2016, however this was delayed at the request of the NVTA Board so that it could consider how it would manage its own administration.  It is not recommended to delay this further as it creates uncertainty for the employee. 

 

Application for Tourist Route

 

Council’s request for Giinagay Way to become a Tourist Drive has not progressed at this stage. The Tourist Attraction Signposting Assessment Committee (TASAC) has not been accepting applications for new tourist drives since 2011 when a review of existing numbered tourist drives commenced. While the review has resulted in the upgrading of signage and promotional material for many of the State’s numbered tourist drives, the review process is still ongoing for several drives and therefore new ones are not being considered at this stage.

 

Nothing would prevent Council from establishing a scenic drive of its own if TASAC continues along the lines above.  However, there can be very high costs associated with establishing and maintaining signposting for tourist drives. Therefore, many local authorities are choosing not to use signage solutions to encourage visitors to explore hinterland areas and instead are employing digital and / or hard copy promotional material as a more cost effective and flexible way of achieving this objective.

 

Council staff will continue to pursue the concept of a Tourist Drive with TASAC and report back.

 

WHERE TO FROM HERE?

 

It is proposed that Council’s Mayor, General Manager and Manager Business Development negotiate a mutually agreeable lease or licence for the Visitor Information Centre with Nambucca Valley Craft and Art Incorporated, with the aim that they be fully operational by mid-December.

 

Council would work with the Macksville Ex-Services Club to establish a Level 3 Visitor Information Centre in Macksville by mid-December.

 

The Tourism Co-ordinator will be relocated to the Council Administration Centre to enable more active involvement in planning post by-pass and in various tourism-related infrastructure projects either being planned or developed. 

 

It is proposed to finalise the Tourism Marketing Blueprint being developed in partnership with My Travel Research.

 

The Tourism Co-ordinator, Manager Business Development and Manager Community Development will collaborate and participate in the development of the new Community Strategic Plan ensuring tourism priorities and goals are included in the Integrated Planning and Reporting Processes.

 

Council will also need to finalise the location of the visitor information and local imagery for the BP Service Centre as a matter of priority.

 

The other immediate priority would be for the Tourism Co-ordinator and Nambucca Valley Craft and Art to work together on a transition for any volunteers wishing to stay at the current VIC location.

 

CONSULTATION:

 

General Manager

Manager Business Development

Tourism Co-ordinator

Manager Human Resources

Safety and Risk Officer

 

SUSTAINABILITY ASSESSMENT:

 

Environment

 

Nothing identified.

 

Social

 

The social aspect of volunteering is well recognised and is considered in the proposed future operations of the VIC. 

 

Economic

 

There is no debating the importance of tourism to the local economy, however in order to drive industry growth, operations need to change. Product development, improvements to infrastructure, negotiating media/advertising deals, promotions through social media, events and hosting small conferences are all areas where Council could assist the industry, having moved away from direct visitor information to visitor services more generally. 

 

Risk

 

With change comes a risk to reputation but this is considered small as Council has expressed no intention to withdraw or reduce support to tourism as an industry.  There will however be less direct financial and staff support to the NVTA Board and individual operators, allowing for increased support to destination marketing etc.

 

 

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS:

 

Direct and indirect impact on current and future budgets

 

Whilst the exact details of the VIC lease is to be determined, the proposal provides Council with some income where previously it was all outgoing/expenditure.  The negotiation will aim to bring into balance income from rental with operational expenses, however this should not be the main focus of the exercise.  Council can afford, within its existing budget, to subsidise the proposed Information and Craft/Art Centre to a small extent as it’s continued to support, not only to Tourism but the Creative Arts sector as well.

 

Source of fund and any variance to working funds

 

Nothing required. 

 

Service level changes and resourcing/staff implications

 

Council does not currently offer any of its core services from the site.  The only Council-related business is the sale of Beach Permits and these are available from a number of other outlets in Nambucca Heads.  Traditionally Council business, such as document exhibition has been available through its Library and with the increasing move to web-based exhibition of material, this is becoming less frequent.

 

Although the Tourism Co-ordinator will be located at the Council Administration Centre, the position remains at 21 hours per week and at its current Grade.  There will however be a change of role as the position becomes more focussed on industry-wide outcomes, destination marketing and our on-line tourism presence. 

 

 

Attachments:

1

34488/2016 - Overview of Accreditation Levels and Criteria for Visitor Information Centres

 

  


Ordinary Council Meeting - 13 October 2016

Visitor Information Centre Leasing and Tourism Update

 


Ordinary Council Meeting                                                                                               13 October 2016

General Manager's Report

ITEM 9.9      SF2150            131016         Bowraville Connections, Stage 1 Community Recreation and Sports Precinct

 

AUTHOR/ENQUIRIES:    Coral Hutchinson, Manager Community Development         

 

Summary:

 

This is a short report to advise Council of the development of a Concept Plan (and submission of an Expression of Interest for funding) for the western side of Bowraville which includes the area from the Preschool, through Hennessy-Tape Oval and amenities, to the Recreation Club.

 

The current precinct is disjointed, containing areas of isolation which discourages casual usage of facilities.  The community has expressed a desire, and indeed made plans and changes themselves, to improve this area of town.

 

A report to this meeting is appropriate given that it is being held in Bowraville.

 

 

Recommendation:

 

That the concept plan be circulated to key stakeholders and organisations in Bowraville for their feedback, noting that the viability, and final location and inclusion of components are yet to be determined. 

 

 

OPTIONS:

 

No options are being presented. 

 

DISCUSSION:

 

An opportunity to make application (Expression of Interest) under the 2016-2017 NSW Clubs Grants presented itself to Council staff whilst Council was in caretaker mode and in the lead up to the Elections. Available funding ranges between $500,000 and $1m.  

 

A short deadline prompted Council staff to capture number of already-known ideas from Bowraville Central School, Bowraville Lions, the Junior Rugby League, Preschool, the Recreation Club as well as those from Council’s own staff and to document these in a Concept Plan (see attached).  An EOI was submitted based on the Plan. 

 

The project, which is described as an intergenerational, multi-sport, recreation and leisure facility for Bowraville will involve improvements to and enhancement of existing facilities and some new construction, in a staged approach.

 

The EOI is essentially Stage 1 and includes a modern, central and safe children’s playground and family picnic area with easy access and space for cultural storytelling; construction of pathways connecting town and schools with the existing sports facilities and Recreation Club; landscaping and revegetation; provision of drinking water stations; picnic tables and seating at the cricket nets. Other work will include repairs to the skate park, stabilising the retaining wall near the Clubhouse/tennis courts and construction of a river access point. Conversion of 1 tennis court to basketball, and construction of a BMX track introduces 2 new recreation options.

 

A new roof at the Recreation Club will ease financial pressure and enhance its viability, whilst minor internal improvements, and refurbishment of the existing bowling greens, will enhance capacity to cater for all age groups, and foster junior sport including golf, bowls and squash.

 

Council’s Grants Officer will include the application in her next report to Council, however it is important that Council and the community are aware of the EOI at this point, given that if Council should move to the next stage of a detailed application (due December 2016), we need to be ready to apply.  If the EOI does not progress, at the least there is a concept plan for further applications for funding either in parts or as a whole.

 

A couple of points to be noted. 

 

Firstly this is a concept and the various components have not been tested for their logic, or social, environmental and engineering viability.  There may also be clear community reasons not to progress certain elements in their proposed location or at all.  More careful scrutiny and community feedback will help refine the Plan. 

 

Also, the Concept plan is a part of a possible future larger project  to create improved connections across Bowraville eg from the Canoe Launch near Grassy park, around or across town to this western precinct.  The plan should interest the community as it has the potential to incorporate strong environmental and social actions for Bowraville.

 

In his report to Council supporting an allocation of funds for a broader plan for Bowraville in the 2016-2017 Budget, the Strategic Planner (Grant Nelson) makes the following observations which relate to this bigger picture:

 

Investigate/ Implement environmental improvements at Bowraville – This allocation is for either riparian weed management/revegetation around Hennessey Tape or the development of an environmental masterplan for the area which will guide future management and be used to attract grant funds, similar to the coastal masterplans and management plans.

A significant proportion of the Environmental Levy funds have been targeted at Coastal areas in past years.  This is largely because government programs direct a lot of funding towards environmental issues in the coastal environment. Rural areas such as Bowraville have been subject to limited funds from the levy in the past. The Bowraville community and town have significant connections with the Nambucca River and there are a number of environmental actions that could be commenced in this area. This funding will either allow for on-ground works to be undertaken or assist to develop a plan for future works in the area.

The Community Development section are working with the Bowraville community on a number of projects that connect with the environment.  This allocation will provide an opportunity to leverage grant applications and support these projects in the area.

 

Further reports to Council as we work towards a broader plan will be forthcoming.  For now Council and the community are asked to note these developments, talk about the Concept Plan and provide ideas and feedback to Council.

 

CONSULTATION:

 

Grants Officer

Senior Community Development Officer

Co-ordinator Strategic Planning and Natural Resources

Manager Assets

Manager Infrastructure Services

Key local organisations

 

SUSTAINABILITY ASSESSMENT:

 

Environment

 

The concept includes significant aspects of environmental interest, particularly the riparian weed management along the river bank and drainage management.

 

Social

 

The numerous existing sport, leisure and learning components, as well as proposed additions, will serve to promote improved social outcomes for Bowraville.  Already there is a popular Preschool, very successful junior rugby league club and infrastructure at the Recreation Club. 

 

Economic

 

The Bowraville Recreation Club is proactively working towards improved viability which in turn will have positive economic outcomes for the town. 

 

Risk

 

A detailed Risk Management Plan is being developed.

 

 

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS:

 

Direct and indirect impact on current and future budgets

 

Contributions listed in the EOI are currently in Council’s budget or are earmarked in forward plans. 

 

Source of fund and any variance to working funds

 

Nothing required.

 

Service level changes and resourcing/staff implications

 

This report does not propose any changes to service levels or impacts on staffing.

 

Attachments:

1

32539/2016 - Community Recreation and Sports Precinct Concepts 21 9 16

 

  


Ordinary Council Meeting - 13 October 2016

Bowraville Connections, Stage 1 Community Recreation and Sports Precinct

 


 


 


Ordinary Council Meeting                                                                                               13 October 2016

General Manager's Report

ITEM 9.10    PRF47              131016         Australian White Ibis Management Plan - Dawkins Park Macksville

 

AUTHOR/ENQUIRIES:    Grant Nelson, Coordinator Strategic Planning & Natural Resources         

 

Summary:

 

The purpose of this report is to provide Council with an Australian White Ibis Management Plan for Dawkins Park. The Management Plan recommends a holistic approach to Australian White Ibis Management and provides estimated costs to implement the management program over a five (5) year period.

 

This report recommends Council engage a suitably qualified contractor to commence implementation of the management program to be funded through the Environmental Levy.

 

 

Recommendation:

 

1        Council commence implementation of the Australian White Ibis Management Plan for Dawkins Lake and a suitably qualified ecologist be engaged to implement the Australian White Ibis Management Plan for Dawkins Park;

 

2        Council commit $16,000 from the Environmental Levy Reserve in 2016/17 financial year to commence the implementation Australian White Ibis Management Plan.

 

 

OPTIONS:

 

Council may choose not to implement the Australian White Ibis Management Plan.

 

 

DISCUSSION:

 

For the information of the new Councillors and as background to this project it is suggested that Council reports on Dawkins Park dated 12 November 2015 and 30 June 2016 be reviewed so as to provide background to this report

 

Nevertheless a brief summary of the project to date is provided below:

 

-     Sporadic water quality monitoring undertaken in response to customer complaints, fish kill and poor amenity;

-     Environmental Levy funds allocated to further examine improvements to Dawkins Park;

-     Landscape Enhancement Plan prepared to guide actions in Dawkins Park;

-     Flora and Fauna Report prepared (in respect to proposed improvements);

-     Landscape Enhancement Plan exhibited and feedback reported to Council;

 

More recently on the 30 June 2016 Council resolved the following in respect to the future management of Dawkins Park:

 

1        That Council endorse Design Option 2, without a permanent pedestrian bridge, to the island within the Dawkins Park Landscape Enhancement Plan dated 21 June 2016 for implementation (Option 2 retains the islands in the centre of the lake).

 

2        That Council seeks expressions of interest from appropriate qualified professionals to prepare an Australian White Ibis Management Plan for Dawkins Park.

 

3        That Council seek expression of interest from appropriately qualified engineering firms to prepare storm water management solutions for the various areas of Dawkins Park including inlets, overland drains, outlets etc. Expressions of interest will also be requested to provide a fee estimate to prepare a management plan for the catchment which includes Hughes Creek (Macksville Drain).  

 

In respect to the above resolutions Council has applied for funding under the Stronger Regions Program to implement option 2 of the Landscape Enhancement Plan [Attachment 1] and Council is yet to be notified of the result of the application. Further Council has engaged Storm Consulting a specialist stormwater management and water quality engineering firm to investigate solutions for water management related to the pond.

 

This report relates to the 2nd resolution for which an Australian White Ibis Management Plan has now been prepared and is ready to be implemented.

 

Australian White Ibis Management Plan (AWIMP)

 

Ecosure, a Wildlife Management/ Ecology firm were engaged to prepare the AWIMP for Dawkins Park [attachment 2]. The AWIMP provides an analysis of the present situation based on literature review and a site visit and provides management responses to issues using a holistic approach which includes:

 

-     minimising local food sources;

-     egg and nest removal;

-     roost dispersal;

-     vegetation management;

-     monitoring; and

-     education

 

The full methodology and costs associated with each of these management responses is provided in the body of the AWIMP.

 

The AWIMP also provides an implementation schedule and costing to assist Council to designate a budget to implement the program. The five (5) year plan is provided below:

 

 

 

The cost to commit to and implement a five year program is approximately $90,000 which could be funded through the Environmental Levy.

 

Recommendation

 

It is important to highlight the significance of the present water quality issues in the pond when Council considers this recommendation and allocating a budget to the program. The below is an extract for the Report to Council in November 2015.

 

Water Quality

 

Gross pollutants have been observed as an issue, with large debris accumulating at the highway culvert, and stormwater inlets.

 

Water quality monitoring has been undertaken sporadically over the last few years. Faecal coliforms and dissolved oxygen have recorded less than desirable results. The presence of faecal coliform in aquatic environments may indicate that the water has been contaminated with the faecal material of humans or other animals. It is noted that birds can be a significant source of faecal coliform bacteria and waterfowl are known to elevate bacterial counts, especially in wetlands, lakes, ponds, and rivers. Organic matter containing faecal coliforms can reduce levels of dissolved oxygen in aquatic environments through aerobic decomposition, this reduced levels of oxygen can cause fish kills. Faecal coliform trigger values are recommended by the ANZECC water quality monitoring guidelines.

 

Samples collected in August 2014 report faecal coliform levels as ‘too numerous to count’ and in October 2014 8600cfu/100ml. These levels are well above those recommended for primary (150cfu/100ml) and secondary (1000cfu/100ml) contact in water bodies.

 

These samples showed Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD) - a measure of dissolved oxygen required by organisms) as 2mg/L in August and 14mg/L in October. The recommended maximum BOD for aquatic systems is 15mg/L and the October result approached this level which may explain the fish kill which occurred in the Nov 2014. This kill was reported to Fisheries as 50+ mullet floating on the surface of the Lake. It is postulated that high levels of faecal coliforms associated with the birdlife in the pond and the hotter October/November weather resulted in a reduction of dissolved oxygen and the fish kill. 

 

Phosphorus levels have also been recorded above recommended trigger values.

 

Description: 2014-11-28 11       Description: Dawkins Pk 027

 

When compared to other areas of Council responsibility for instance the regulation of on-site effluent management systems, should Council receive water quality results of 10 cfu/100ml on a aerated treatment system on private property, the system is considered to be failing and Council would commence appropriate action with the landholder to repair/ improve the system.

 

Further there are few records of fish kills in the Nambucca Shire and fact that this has occurred on a Council managed reserve is significant, and although any issue of this nature deserves equal attention the fact it has occurred across the road from Council Chambers does not reflect well on Council.

 

It is recommended that Council commit funds from the Environmental Levy over a five year period to implement this AWIMP. Council will have the opportunity to the review the program when considering the results which will be provided when the Environmental Levy Budget is prepared each year.

 

At the reconciliation of the Environmental Levy in 2015/16 financial year, there is approximately $116,000 held in the Environmental Levy Reserve. It is recommended that $16,000 be committed to the implementation of AWIMP actions for the remainder of this financial year.

 

The remaining funds be held in reserve for the time being, as potential matching funds to support grant applications or potential issues with existing projects. Further reports would be prepared to Council should the funds be required.

 

 

CONSULTATION:

 

General Manager

 

 

SUSTAINABILITY ASSESSMENT:

 

Environment

 

The management of the AWI population at Dawkins Park, is considered in part an appropriate response to the water quality and amenity issues present at Dawkins Park. The recommended management responses form part of suite of actions proposed to improve the present function, amenity and general appearance of the Park.

 

Social

 

During the exhibition of the proposed landscape enhancement plan for Dawkins Park Council received numerous comments from the public in respect to the AWI and associated issues.

 

Economic

 

The implementation of the AWIMP plan in combination with other activities proposed in Dawkins Park is likely to improve the function and amenity of the Park. The improvements provide greater potential for the park to be recognised as quality place for the community and also persons travelling on the north coast.

 

Risk

 

Although the management actions proposed in this report have been successful in decreasing AWI numbers elsewhere, there is no guarantee that they will be effective at Dawkins Park.

 

Also should the habitat on Dawkins Park become undesirable for the AWI, they may find appropriate habitat elsewhere in the shire. A new location may also be undesirable from a water quality/ social perspective.

 

 

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS:

 

Direct and indirect impact on current and future budgets

 

The estimated budget to implement the management plan over a five (5) year period is $90,000.

 

Source of fund and any variance to working funds

 

Environmental Levy

 

Service level changes and resourcing/staff implications

 

The program would be added to the portfolio of projects presently being managed by the Environment and Planning section. Costings are based on actions being undertaken by contractors. The contractors have also identified the potential to run a training package for Council staff. The training would provide staff with the skills to undertake dispersal activities. Staff involvement with dispersal would require a commitment to undertake dispersal twice per week on sunset or just after dark. The use of local volunteers to undertake dispersal may also be an option which would need to be investigated.

 

 

Attachments:

1

21419/2016 - Dawkins Park Concept Design Options 21 Jun 2016

 

2

34106/2016 - final draft IBIS Management PLan PR1912-RE.AWIMP Dawkins Park.FI

 

  


Ordinary Council Meeting - 13 October 2016

Australian White Ibis Management Plan - Dawkins Park Macksville

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Ordinary Council Meeting - 13 October 2016

Australian White Ibis Management Plan - Dawkins Park Macksville

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Ordinary Council Meeting                                                                                               13 October 2016

General Manager's Report

ITEM 9.11    SF2173            131016         Development Applications greater than 12 months or where submissions received - 21 September to 6 October 2016

 

AUTHOR/ENQUIRIES:    Lisa Hall, Technical Officer - Development and Environment         

 

Summary:

In accordance with Council resolution from 15 May 2008 meeting, the development applications listed below are in excess of 12 months old (Table 1).

 

Table 2 shows development applications which have been received but not yet determined due to submissions received.  In accordance with Minute 848/08 from the Council meeting of 18 December 2008, should any Councillor wish to “call in” an application a Notice of Motion is required specifying the reasons why it is to be “called in”.

 

If an application is not called in and staff consider the matters raised by the submissions have been adequately addressed then the application will be processed under delegated authority.  Where refusal is recommended the application may be reported to Council for determination.

 

 

Recommendation:

 

That the information be noted by Council.

 

 

 

TABLE 1: UNRESOLVED DEVELOPMENT APPLICATIONS IN EXCESS OF 12 MONTHS OLD

 

DA NO

DATE OF RECEIPT

PROPOSAL

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION

2015/099

2 July 2015

132 Lot Residential Subdivision

Lot 1 DP 1119830, Marshall Way, Nambucca Heads

STATUS: Additional information requested by RFS – applicant has until 10 October to provide this.

 

 

TABLE 2: DEVELOPMENT APPLICATIONS NOT YET DETERMINED WHERE SUBMISSIONS HAVE BEEN RECEIVED

 

DA NO

DATE OF RECEIPT

PROPOSAL

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION

2015/099

2 July 2015

132 Lot Residential Subdivision

Lot 1 DP 1119830, Marshall Way, Nambucca Heads

SUBMISSIONS RECEIVED

Two public submissions has been received – they oppose the development:

·        The increase in expected traffic raises major concerns re safety (particularly for the elderly and the young), congestion, parking within the Plaza and speeding.

·        Concerned that there isn’t enough local infrastructure and services to support new residents eg doctors.

·        A community forum should be held to gauge dissatisfaction with the proposal

·        Spring Street isn’t wide enough to cope with the increased traffic

·        Stormwater in Spring Street and surrounding areas is already a problem

·        Concerned about the safety of turning out of Spring Street, when Marshall Way is a through road

STATUS: Additional information requested by RFS – applicant has until 10 October to provide this.

DA NUMBER

DATE OF RECEIPT

PROPOSAL

ADDRESS

2016/142

29 August 2016

Retail Premises

Lots 13 & 14 Section F DP 20823, 7 Adin Street, Scotts Head

Three submissions have been received which support the proposal and one has been received which opposes it

·           One submission mentioned that they would prefer a dark, non-reflective roof to be installed on the development.

·           One submission is concerned with drainage, stormwater runoff and a retaining wall.

STATUS: Additional information requested from applicant

DA NUMBER

DATE OF RECEIPT

PROPOSAL

ADDRESS

2016/140

24 August 2016

Demolition of existing building & erection of dwelling-house

Lot 110, DP 1014095, 47 Wallace Street, Scotts Head

One submission has been received – it supports the proposal, with conditions

·           A tree in the easement at the rear of the block should be removed due to safety concerns

·           All stormwater needs to be directed to stormwater infrastructure

STATUS: Being assessed

DA NUMBER

DATE OF RECEIPT

PROPOSAL

ADDRESS

2016/146

2September 2016

Markets

Lot 11 DP 607046, 26 West Street, Scotts Head (Scotts Head Bowling Club Car Park)

One submission has been received – it opposes the proposal

·           Increased noise impacting on nearby residences due to early set up

·           Increased parking in Adin Street will lead to dangerous congestion

·           The Village Green would be a preferable site

·           Markets are already being advertised prior to decision being made by Council

·           How can Council be sure that funds raised are going back to the community?

STATUS: Being assessed

DA NUMBER

DATE OF RECEIPT

PROPOSAL

ADDRESS

2016/147

5 September 2016

Telecommunications Facility

Lot: 28 DP: 1048659, Vernon Street Scotts Head (Buz Brazel Park)

Twenty-four submissions have been received – all oppose the proposal

·           Too close to the Yarning Circle and other parts of the park where people relax

·           The proposed fence is divisive and aggressive

·           It is too close to the school – health and safety concerns from exposure to radiation

·           Not enough community consultation

·           Incompatible land use

·           Proposed screening is not sufficient

·           Unsuitable visual impact

·           Another site should be used instead – Gumma or Yarrahapinni

·           Properties will be devalued

·           Will impact on mental health of those who live nearby

·           Information in SEE is incorrect – pole is not screened, the vegetation to the east is not dense, there is no vegetation to the north.

·           Will disturb the habitat of the glossy black cockatoo and other wildlife

·           4G data and voice already available in Scotts Head

·           Emf information appears to be incorrect

·           Submission period shouldn’t be in the school holidays.

STATUS: As the council is the owner of the land, arrangements have been made for the development application to be assessed by staff of Bellingen Shire Council.  Again, because this council is the owner of the land, the application will be reported to the elected Council for determination rather than be determined under delegated authority.

DA NUMBER

DATE OF RECEIPT

PROPOSAL

ADDRESS

2016/164

21 September 2016

Dual Occupancy – second dwelling

Lot 27 Section H DP 20823, 19 Wallace Street, Scotts Head

Two submissions have been received – they oppose the proposal

·           Privacy and overshadowing issues

·           Stormwater needs to be dealt with appropriately

·           Driveway shouldn’t be gravel

·           Asbestos should be removed according to regulations

STATUS: Being assessed

DA NUMBER

DATE OF RECEIPT

PROPOSAL

ADDRESS

2014/084/03

15 September 2016

Dwelling Additions -Modification

Lot 2 DP 1157968, 34 Short Street, Nambucca Heads

One submission has been received - it opposes aspects of the modification

·           There has been a lack of adequate communication about the retaining wall on the boundary.

STATUS: Being assessed

Attachments:

There are no attachments for this report.  


Ordinary Council Meeting                                                                                               13 October 2016

General Manager's Report

ITEM 9.12    SF1320            131016         Provision of Insurance Brokerage Services

 

AUTHOR/ENQUIRIES:    Ken Fowler, Safety and Risk Officer         

 

Summary:

 

To discuss and accept a proposal for a tender in relation to the provision of insurance brokerage.

 

 

Recommendation:

 

That Council engage Regional Procurement to undertake a tender on behalf of Nambucca Shire Council for the provision of Insurance Brokerage Services.

 

 

OPTIONS:

 

Status quo – remain with our current insurance broker Statewide Mutual.

Develop a tender document internally and test the market.

Engage an external provider to develop the tender documents and manage the tender process.

 

 

DISCUSSION:

 

Since 2006, Statewide Mutual has provided an insurance brokerage service to council. The insurance services provided have been Crime, Limited Flood, Public Liability, Property, Personal Accident and Motor Vehicle.

 

Earlier this year Aon, another broker in this market, approached a number of councils including Nambucca Shire Council with an offer to benchmark our current insurance service and to provide a report.

This offer was accepted by and the report presented on the 16 June 2016 with Council resolving to test the market.

 

Initially other councils which we were advised were also testing the market, were approached to determine whether they would be interested in participating with us in a joint tender. These approaches proved unsuccessful. A number of councils who had tested the market previously were also approached for assistance. But again this proved unsuccessful. It was also determined that due to the complexity and risks involved with the insurance industry, specialist knowledge would be required to develop the tender and that Nambucca Shire did not have this expertise.

 

After some discussion with interested internal stakeholders, it was noted that Regional Procurement were preparing a “Request for Tender” package for Maitland Council. I approached Regional Procurement on behalf of Council to obtain further information and an indication of the cost involved. They have spoken to Aon and Jardine Lloyd Thompson/ Statewide to discuss the tender process, what should be included in the tender and some ground rules.

 

There are four major insurance brokers in NSW which have the scale and experience to tender for this service; Marsh, Willis, Aon and JLT/ Statewide. As mentioned previously this will be a complex tender document, which needs to address a number of factors.

 

Regional Procurement’s fee is likely to be around $4,400 (GST inclusive) per council, which represents good value considering the work required.

 

The process will need to start early 2017 to ensure we have continual insurance coverage.

 

 

CONSULTATION:

 

General Manager

Assistant General Manager Engineering Services

Assistant General Manager Corporate Services

JLT

Aon

Albury City Council – provided some advice on their tender process

 

 

SUSTAINABILITY ASSESSMENT:

 

Environment

 

Not Applicable

 

Social

 

Not Applicable

 

Economic

 

Not Applicable

 

Risk

 

Financial – inadequate coverage, higher premiums.

Asset – service levels inadequate

Reputational – lack of specialist knowledge

 

 

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS:

 

Direct and indirect impact on current and future budgets

 

Significant premium savings may result.

 

Source of fund and any variance to working funds

 

At this stage the only impact on working funds will be the $4,400 fee payable to Regional Procurement.

 

Service level changes and resourcing/staff implications

 

Current staff are not specialised in this area.

 

 

Attachments:

There are no attachments for this report.


Ordinary Council Meeting                                                                                               13 October 2016

General Manager's Report

ITEM 9.13    SF1438            131016         Community Stragetic Plan Review and Corporate Performance Reporting

 

AUTHOR/ENQUIRIES:    Scott Norman, Assistant General Manager Corporate Services         

 

Summary:

 

NSW Local Government uses a legislated Intergrade Planning and Reporting framework.  This framework aligns with the terms of elected Councils and a newly elected Council is required review the top level strategic document “the Community Strategic Plan” prior to 30 June the following year.  Changes in the “Community Strategic Plan” flow through to the subordinate planning and reporting documents, so it is useful if the Plan is reviewed early enough so the next budget reflects the priorities of the new Council.  This report lays out a time frame to deliver this.

 

 

Recommendation:

 

1        That Council note the information in this report.

 

2        That Council resolve to hold a workshop to develop a draft revised Community Strategic Plan on Thursday 15th December 2016.

 

 

 

OPTIONS:

 

The Integrated Planning and Reporting (IP&R) requirements are legislated; it is at Council discretion how they approach developing these documents.

 

 

DISCUSSION:

 

NSW Local Government uses a legislated Intergrade Planning and Reporting framework. 

 

The framework is commonly represented by the pictorial diagram below which shows the relationship between the key components.

 

 

At the top of the diagram is the Community Strategic Plan, this reflects its  role as the key strategic planning document that articulates the Council’s vision for the community and the key objectives that align with that vision.  The plan takes a long term view and must have at least 10 year time frame.  To make sure a newly elected Council’s objectives align with the plan it is required to review it prior to 30 June the following year. Changes to the Community Strategic Plan flow through to the subordinate planning and reporting documents so it is desirable the Plan be reviewed early enough so the next budget reflects the priorities of the new Council. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A more complete explanation of the Integrated Planning and Reporting can be found at https://www.olg.nsw.gov.au.

 

Detailed requirements can be found at Integrated-Planning-and-Reporting-Manual.

 

The “how to” on delivering these requirements can be found at Integrated-Planning-and-Reporting-Guidelines.  Complying with the guidelines is mandatory.

 

 

It is proposed the approach to reviewing the Plan be one of evolution not revolution; using the existing plan as the starting point and refining and changing the document as Council sees fit.  This is the second Community Strategic Plan prepared by Council and this approach should produce a more “mature” document by retaining the best of the original Plan and improving the rest.

 

An internal working group has already been agreed, their role is to support Council develop the new plan.  An initial project plan is provided below; this is provided as a guide.

 

Date

Action

June 16 Manex A

Agree to strategy, appoint Working Group

25 August 2016

A report on the progress on implementation of the Community Strategic Plan presented at the final meeting of the outgoing council.

10 Sept  2016

Council Election

29 Sept  2016

IPR Process reviewed by Manex

13 Oct  2016

IPR briefing for new Councillor’s before Council meeting.  Followed by first report on review of the Strategic Plan and Corporate Reporting to Council meeting (this report)  -set date for Community Plan Workshop.

15 December 2016

Community Plan Council Workshop (proposed)

Jan 2017

Draft Community Plan Strategic Plan presented to Council - Draft finalised

Feb 2017

Draft Community Plan Strategic Plan adopted  - out for Public Consultation

Mar 2017

Draft Community Plan Strategic Plan finalised and adopted by Council.

Mar  2017

Draft Delivery Program to Council - Reflects New Community Plan

May 2017

Draft Operational Plan to Council - Budget

June 2017

Draft Delivery Program and Operational Plan Public Consultation

Prior June 30 2017

Delivery Program and Operational Plan adopted.

Jan 2018

Report Achievements Against Delivery Program 6 months ended December 2017

 

 

CONSULTATION:

 

General Manager Michael Coulter, Manager Information Services Daniel Finlayson, Manager of Finance Craig Doolan.  Manex A

 

 

SUSTAINABILITY ASSESSMENT and FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

 

This is the process that establishes Council’s priories and allocates funding for the current term.

 

Attachments:

There are no attachments for this report.  


Ordinary Council Meeting                                                                                               13 October 2016

Corporate Services

ITEM 10.1    SF2230            131016         Investment Report To 31 July 2016

 

AUTHOR/ENQUIRIES:    Faye Hawthorne, Accountant         

 

Summary:

 

The return on investments from 1 July 2016 to 30 June 2017 is $978,491.

 

The budget allocation for the financial year “2016/17” was $876,100.

 

Council currently has $32.242 Million invested:

 

·      $   5.999     Million with Managed Funds,

·      $   1.927     Million with On Call Accounts

·      $ 21.316      Million on Term Deposits

·      $   3.000     Million with Floating Rate Notes

 

This report details all the investments placed during July and Council funds invested as at 30 September 2016.

 

The following investment report has been drawn up in accordance with the Local Government Act 1993 (as amended), the Regulations and Council Policy 1.9 – Investment of Surplus Funds

 

 

 

C P Doolan

Responsible Accounting Officer

 

 

Recommendation:

 

That the Accountants’ Report on Investments placed to 31 August 2016 be noted.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

OPTIONS:

 

This report is for information only.

 

DISCUSSION:

 

This report details all the investments placed during September 2016 and Council funds invested as at September 2016.

 

CONSULTATION:

 

Grove Research and Advisory

 

SUSTAINABILITY ASSESSMENT:

 

Environment

 

There are no environmental implications.

 

Social

 

There are no social implications.

 

Economic

 

Risk

 

That Council may not meet its budget returns for 2016/2017 based on current performance.

 

 

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS:

 

Direct and indirect impact on current and future budgets

 

A review of budgeted interest returns for 2016/2017 will be completed with the September 2016 Budget Review and GPG Research & Advisory will provide Council with the updated interest rates.

 

Source of fund and any variance to working funds

 

Interest on investments will be assessed with the September 2016 Budget Review, Variances will be distributed between the Water, Sewerage and General Funds for the financial year each quarter.

 

Service level changes and resourcing/staff implications

 

Not applicable

 

 

Attachments:

There are no attachments for this report.  


Ordinary Council Meeting                                                                                               13 October 2016

Corporate Services

ITEM 10.2    SF251              131016         Schedule of Council Public Meetings

 

AUTHOR/ENQUIRIES:    Monika Schuhmacher, Executive Assistant/Business Services Unit         

 

SUMMARY:

 

The following is a schedule of dates for public Council meetings.  The meeting dates may change from to time and this will be recorded in the next available report to Council.

 

 

 

Recommendation:

 

That the schedule of dates for public Council meetings be noted and received for information by Council.

 

 

 

MEETING

DATE

VENUE

COMMENCING

Council Induction Briefing

22 September

Council Chambers

4.00 pm

Access Committee Meeting

27 September

Council Chambers

2.00 PM

Ordinary Council Meeting

29 September

Council Chambers

5.30 PM

Ordinary Council Meeting

13 October

Bowraville Theatre

5.30 PM

Access Committee Meeting

25 October

Council Chambers

2.00 PM

Ordinary Council Meeting

27 October

Council Chambers

5.30 PM

Ordinary Council Meeting

10 November

Nambucca Community & Arts Centre, Nambucca Heads

5.30 PM

Access Committee Meeting

22 November

Council Chambers

2.00 PM

Ordinary Council Meeting

24 November

Council Chambers

5.30 PM

Ordinary Council Meeting

15 December

Utungun Community Hall

5.30 PM

 

Note:   Departure times to off-site meetings have been added.

Note:   Meetings at the Rural Halls commence with light refreshments at 5.00 pm.

 

 

 

Attachments:

There are no attachments for this report.  


Ordinary Council Meeting                                                                                               13 October 2016

Assistant General Manager Corporate Services Report

ITEM 10.3    SF298              131016         Argents Hill Hall Committee of Management - Minutes of Annual General Meeting - 12 September 2016

 

AUTHOR/ENQUIRIES:    Monika Schuhmacher, Executive Assistant/Business Services Unit         

 

:

 

The report acknowledges the Annual General Meeting of the Argents Hill Hall’s Committee of Management and the new Committee.  A copy of the Minutes of this meeting, which was conducted on 12 September 2016, is attached.  TO BE RECEIVED

 

 

Recommendation:

 

That Council endorse minutes of the Committee of Management for Argents Hill Hall’s Annual General Meeting held on 12 September 2016, and thank the outgoing Committee for their work in the past twelve months.

 

 

 

OPTIONS:

 

There are no real options.  Council needs voluntary Committees of Management to manage recreation and community facilities across the Nambucca Valley.

 

 

DISCUSSION:

 

The AGM of the Argents Hill Hall Committee of Management was held on Monday 12 September 2016.

 

The new office bearers for the Committee for 2016/17 are:

 

President:                       Mark Larkin

Vice President:                Gary Kohlhagen

Secretary:                       David Phillips

Treasurer:                        Leanne Davidson

Fundraising & Events      Denise Deboer

Committee Members:      Jenny Phillips, Bob Young

 

 

CONSULTATION:

 

There has been no consultation preparing this report.

 

 

SUSTAINABILITY ASSESSMENT:

 

Environment

 

There are no implications for the environment.

 

Social

 

There are no social implications.

 

Economic

 

There are no economic implications.

 

Risk

 

There are no risk implications.

 

 

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS:

 

Direct and indirect impact on current and future budgets

 

There are no financial implications.

 

Source of fund and any variance to working funds

 

There are no implications for working funds.

 

 

Attachments:

There are no attachments for this report.

 


Ordinary Council Meeting                                                                                               13 October 2016

Corporate Services

ITEM 10.4    SF344              131016         Warrell Creek Hall Committee of Management AGM - 2 September 2015 - Minutes

 

AUTHOR/ENQUIRIES:    Monika Schuhmacher, Executive Assistant/Business Services Unit         

 

Summary:

 

The report acknowledges the Minutes of the Annual General Meeting of the Warrell Creek Hall Committee of Management and the new Committee.  Copies of the Minutes of this meeting held on 7 September 2016, including the Treasurer’s report, are attached.

 

 

Recommendation:

 

That Council endorse the Minutes of the Committee of Management for the Warrell Creek Hall’s Annual General Meeting held on 7 September 2016 and thank the outgoing Committee for their work in the past twelve months.

 

 

OPTIONS:

 

There are no real options.  Council needs voluntary Committees of Management to manage recreation and community facilities across the Nambucca Valley.

 

 

DISCUSSION:

 

The Annual General Meeting of the Warrell Creek Hall’s Committee of Management was held on Wednesday 7 September 2016.

 

The Committee of Management for 2016/2017 comprises:

 

          President                        Ray Williams

          Vice President                 Helen Searle

          Secretary                        Robyn Wood

          Treasurer                         Julie Roberts

          Booking Officers             Julie Roberts

          Committee Members       Shane O’Neill, Tracey Welsh

 

 

CONSULTATION:

 

There was no consultation.

 

 

SUSTAINABILITY ASSESSMENT:

 

Environment

 

There are no implications for the environment.

 

Social

 

There are no social implications.

 

Economic

 

There are no economic implications.

 

Risk

 

This report poses no risk to Council.

 

 

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS:

 

Direct and indirect impact on current and future budgets

 

There are no financial implications.

 

Source of fund and any variance to working funds

 

There are no implications for working funds.

 

Service level changes and resourcing/staff implications

 

There are not changes to service levels nor are there any resourcing/staff implications.

 

 

Attachments:

1

31906/2016 - Minutes of AGM held 7 September 2016

 

  


Ordinary Council Meeting - 13 October 2016

Warrell Creek Hall Committee of Management AGM - 2 September 2015 - Minutes

 


 


 


 


 


Ordinary Council Meeting                                                                                               13 October 2016

Assistant General Manager Corporate Services Report

ITEM 10.5    SF588              131016         Nambucca District Historical Society Committee of Management - Minutes of Annual General Meeting - 20 September 2016

 

AUTHOR/ENQUIRIES:    Monika Schuhmacher, Executive Assistant/Business Services Unit         

 

SUMMARY:

 

The Nambucca District Historical Society held its Annual General Meeting on 20 September 2016 – a copy of the minutes and the Treasurer’s reports are attached

 

 

Recommendation:

 

That Council endorse the minutes of the Committee of Management for the Nambucca District Historical Society’s Annual General Meeting held on 20 September 2016.

 

 

OPTIONS:

 

There are no real options.  Council needs voluntary Committees of management to manage recreation and community facilities across the Nambucca Valley.

 

 

DISCUSSION:

 

The AGM of the Nambucca District Historical Society Committee of Management was held on 20 September 2016

 

The Committee of Management for 2016/2017 comprises:

 

          President                        Clyde Piggott

          Vice President                 Edna Stride

          Secretary                        Jenny Ballangarry

          Assistant Secretary         Sue Cambage

          Treasurer                         Sue Cambage

 

 

CONSULTATION:

 

There was no consultation.

 

 

SUSTAINABILITY ASSESSMENT:

 

Environment

 

There are no implications for the environment.

 

Social

 

There are no social implications.

 

Economic

 

There are no economic implications.

 

Risk

 

There are no risk implications.

 

 

INANCIAL IMPLICATIONS:

 

Direct and indirect impact on current and future budgets

 

There are no financial implications.

 

Source of fund and any variance to working funds

 

There are no implications for working funds.

 

Service level changes and resourcing/staff implications

 

There are no changes or implications stemming from this report.

 

 

 

Attachments:

1

33373/2016 - Minutes of AGM - 20 September 2016

 

  


Ordinary Council Meeting - 13 October 2016

Nambucca District Historical Society Committee of Management - Minutes of Annual General Meeting - 20 September 2016

 


 


 


 


 


Ordinary Council Meeting                                                                                               13 October 2016

Assistant General Manager Corporate Services Report

ITEM 10.6    SF323              131016         Nambucca Community and Arts Centre Committee of Management Annual General Meeting - 19 August 2016

 

AUTHOR/ENQUIRIES:    Monika Schuhmacher, Executive Assistant/Business Services Unit         

 

SUMMARY:

 

The report acknowledges the minutes of the Annual General Meeting (AGM) which was held on Wednesday 19 August 2016, of the Nambucca Community and Arts Centre Committee of Management.  Copies of the Minutes of this meeting and the Financial Statement are attached.

 

 

Recommendation:

 

That Council endorse the minutes of the Committee of Management for the Nambucca Community and Arts Centre’s Annual General Meeting held on 19 August 2016 and thank the outgoing Committee for their work in the past twelve months.

 

 

OPTIONS:

 

There are no real options.  Council needs voluntary Committees of Management to manage recreation and community facilities across the Nambucca Valley.

 

 

DISCUSSION:

 

The AGM of the Nambucca Entertainment Centre Committee of Management was held on Friday 19 August 2016.

 

The Committee of Management for 2016/2017 comprises:

 

          President                                  Dianne Gulson

          Vice President                          Marlene Griffin

          Secretary                                  Mike Griffin

          Booking Officer                        Carol McKee

          Treasurer                                  Pete Rundle

Committee Members:                Cr Anne Smyth, Pete Rundle, Arlene Duffus, Jo Smyth, Harold

                                                Fowler, Pat Richardson, Tony Waugh

 

 

CONSULTATION:

 

There was no consultation.

 

 

SUSTAINABILITY ASSESSMENT:

 

Environment

 

There are no implications for the environment.

 

Social

 

There are no social implications.

 

Economic

 

There are no economic implications.

 

Risk

 

There are no risk implications.

 

 

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS:

 

Direct and indirect impact on current and future budgets

 

There are no financial implications.

 

Source of fund and any variance to working funds

 

There are no implications for working funds.

 

Service level changes and resourcing/staff implications

 

There are no changes to service levels or resourcing.

 

 

Attachments:

1

33821/2016 - Minutes of AGM - 19 August 2016

 

  


Ordinary Council Meeting - 13 October 2016

Nambucca Community and Arts Centre Committee of Management Annual General Meeting - 19 August 2016

 


 


 


 


 


 

 


Ordinary Council Meeting                                                                                               13 October 2016

Assistant General Manager Engineering Services Report

ITEM 11.1    SF453              131016         Waste Disposal Vouchers

 

AUTHOR/ENQUIRIES:    Simon Chapman, Civic Services Coordinator; Michael Coulter, General Manager         

 

Summary:

 

It is anticipated that the new Coffs Coast Waste Service (CCWS) collection contract may see a significant cost increase for the kerbside collection of bulky goods The extension to the existing Coffs Coast Waste Service collection contract to March 2018 presented Council with an opportunity to trial the use of a voucher system and potentially transition away from the restricted areas of kerbside collection for bulky goods with the provision of a more equitable service to all of the community across the Nambucca Local Government area.

 

At the Council meeting held on the 28 January 2016 Council resolved to approve a proposed trial to the kerbside bulky goods collection with the introduction of a voucher system from 4 July 2016 and receive a report on the status of the trial and the outcome of a survey undertaken of residents on the use of the service and the proposed changes.

 

The survey provided an opportunity for the whole community to evaluate another alternative to the existing service. The survey results indicate:

 

·      That 70% of the respondents used the bulky goods collection service twice per year and 11% of the survey respondents only once per year.

 

·      That only 24% of the respondents said they would definitely use the new service and 15% said they would probably use it. A significant percentage of respondents (56%), were unlikely to use the service with the most common reason being they did not have a suitable vehicle.

 

Council will need to consider the various options for the “cost and ability to pay v’s the provision of service v’s the communities’ desire” as well as the provision of a more equitable service to all of the community.

 

 

Recommendation:

 

1        That Council receive and note the information provided in the bulky goods voucher system report.

 

2        That Council continue with the voucher system for both urban and rural residents until the cessation of the extended period for the waste contract (March 2018).

 

3        That one or more three cubic metre cage mounted box trailers be located at the Nambucca Waste Facility for use by eligible residents to transport their bulky goods in the case that they do not have access to a trailer.

 

 

OPTIONS:

 

1    Council can consider one only bulky goods kerbside collection per year.

 

2    Council can continue with the voucher system and allow the residents to trade two for one to receive a kerbside bulky goods collection.

 

3    Council can offer either one or two vouchers for rural residents to present at the waste depot as there is no collection for rural properties.

 

4    Council could offer an infirm residents service where they forgo one voucher per annum to receive a restricted collection service.

 

 

 

DISCUSSION:

 

The kerbside collection of bulky goods under the current Coffs Coast Waste Service collection contract commenced in November 2005 and is only available for properties that receive a domestic kerbside waste collection service.

 

Pending the determination of a new tender for the waste collection service in early 2017, the extension of the existing collection contract until March 2018 presented Council with an opportunity to transition away from the scheduled bulky goods collection service and trial the use of a voucher system where the community could evaluate another alternative to the existing service which is restricted to residents who receive a weekly kerbside waste collection.

 

Council at its meeting held on the 28 January 2016 resolved as follows:

 

1    That Council approve the proposed trial of the changes to the kerbside bulky goods collection with the introduction of a voucher system from 4 July 2016.

 

2    That Coffs Coast Waste Services and Council undertake extensive marketing on the changes to the bulky goods collection arrangements, including providing information with the rates notices to be mailed out in July 2016.

 

In May 2016, all Nambucca Shire Council premises paying a waste levy (including rural properties not receiving a weekly waste collection) were mailed a tri-fold brochure and a survey, introducing the proposed bulky goods trial voucher system.

 

The voucher system commenced on 4 July 2016 and is based on a system developed in consultation with Councils contractor (Handybin Waste Services) and administered under Coffs Coast Waste Services (CCWS). The process involved is as follows:

 

1    Residents telephone the Coffs Coast Waste Services (CCWS) 1800 Hotline and request a voucher;

2    The CCWS Call Centre collect the residents details, including the property address to which the voucher applies;

3    Call centre staff confirm eligibility for this service from the Council’s database;

4    If eligible, a voucher and information brochure is posted to the address provided;

5    The resident takes their bulky goods to the Nambucca Waste Facility and presents their voucher;

6    Waste facility staff scan the voucher and receive feedback from the online tracking system as to whether the voucher is eligible or not; and

7    Waste facility staff ensures compliance with requirements of the voucher system and direct residents to the correct area to dispose of their bulky goods.

 

Scheduled Kerbside Bulky Goods Collection System

 

The kerbside collection of bulky goods presented a number of increasing challenges for Council staff and its waste collection contractor over the period of the contract. These are indicated below:

 

·      Payment for the service – Regardless of whether the eligible residents use the service or not, Council pay for the service under the provisions of the contract.

·      Aesthetics - Piles of bulky goods material were presented at the front of properties throughout the Shire in two separate months every calendar year (generally around peak tourist /holiday periods) which created an eyesore for both residents and visitors alike.

·      Illegal Dumping - Illegally dumped materials were being presented as bulky goods which have become increasingly problematic over the past few years. This is as a direct result of increased landfill disposal rates attributed to the NSW Environment Protection Authority’s Waste to Landfill Levy. There is also increasing evidence that people located outside the kerbside collection areas are disposing of their unwanted items by placing them out the front of any house located in the kerbside collection areas in large quantities.

·      Incorrect Items - Despite ongoing education, incorrect items were continually being presented at the kerbside such as recyclable and hazardous materials, even though these are free to dispose of at the Nambucca Waste Facility.

·      Undersize Items - The kerbside collection system was initially designed to remove bulky waste items that won’t fit into residents wheelie bins, however smaller items are also being presented at the kerbside for collection.

·      Oversize Piles – Materials that were presented at the kerbside for collection significantly exceed the allowable 3 cubic metre maximum size under the contract. Dealing with non-compliant oversize piles takes significant resources in dealing with the offender(s), who invariably places the blame on other parties for dumping illegally in front of their house.

·      Safety - The collection of kerbside bulky goods will inevitably require an increased focus on traffic control and manual handling techniques for councils and its contractors into the future. Unattended piles of materials left on the kerbside for a bulky goods collection also poses a potential safety risk to home occupiers, pedestrians and the general public.

·      Scavenging - Kerbside bulky goods attracts scavenging for items that can be reused or sold. In theory this is helping recover resources however this process is completely uncontrolled and often happens late at night. Sought after items are typically located within a pile of other material, and the removal process often results in other items being scattered and left as is. Source separation at a licensed Waste Facility provides the same result within a controlled environment.

·      Littering – Bulky goods material presented at the kerbside prior to the scheduled collection results in unsecured items often being blown away from the pile causing unsightly litter, especially those smaller and lighter item that should have otherwise been disposed of in the residents’ wheelie bins.

·      Rural Residents - Rural properties are raised a “tip availability” charge which goes towards the operational costs of running a landfill for the Shire. This charge does not include a kerbside waste collection service.

·      Schedule Collection Dates – The bulky goods collection areas were broken up into 5 different areas across the Shire with key dates being advertised for material to be placed at the kerb. On most occasions during the current contract period, bulky goods materials were presented and placed at the kerb weeks before the scheduled date thereby exacerbating the points raised above,. The contracted dates also coincide with peak tourist/holiday period presenting an unsightly look

 

Bulky Goods Trial Voucher System

CCWS electronic reporting data base has been modified to incorporate the ability to extract reports on the trial voucher system identifying both town and rural residents that have requested vouchers. The tables below and attached (TRIM 33352/2016) indicate the total number of vouchers, mailed out and breakup between urban and rural areas and disposal tonnages since the inception on the 4 July 2016.

 

 

Non Rural

Rural

Total

Vouchers Mailed Out

414

132

546

 

 

Vouchers

Tonnage

Vouchers Presented

108

27.76

 

The benefits of a bulky goods voucher system have been identified as follows:

 

·      Flexibility - Residents are able to dispose of waste at a time that suits them, rather than wait for their kerbside service which is limited to one week every six months. This not only provides convenience to residents but is also likely to contribute to a reduction in illegal dumping.

·      Incorrect Items - The voucher system better controls the presentation of incorrect items, and therefore a better quality waste product is received at the waste facility. Residents are also entitled to drop off items free of charge to the waste facility at the same time as their bulky goods which would otherwise have not been collected through a scheduled bulky goods collection service. Such items include: car batteries, computers, gas cylinders, hazardous chemicals, light globes, motor oil (up to 20 lts), scrap metal, smoke detectors etc.

·      Property Identification - The trial voucher system requires call centre staff to check eligibility from Council’s database before issuing a voucher.

·      Improved Resource Recovery - The self-haul and delivery of individual loads to the waste management facility ensures maximum sorting and recovery / recycling of suitable items prior to landfill disposal in a controlled manner.

·      Data Collection - Data collection relating to the voucher system is collected “live” by the online tracking system, as vouchers are requested and/or presented at the waste facility. This system automatically tracks and reports on total vouchers requested and total vouchers presented, by both rural and non-rural properties. The system could also be extended into the future to link disposal tonnages to rural / non-rural or even by Suburb if required.

·      Education - The process of presenting bulky goods to the waste facility enables the face-to-face education of residents by waste facility staff, including details about the acceptability of items and how to maximise the recovery of recyclable materials.

·      Rural Residents - Approximately 1,440 rural properties who were not previously eligible for a kerbside bulky goods service, are now able to access the trial voucher system. This service is provided at no extra cost to these residents.

 

Bulky Goods Survey

 

The graphs attached (TRIM 33393/2016) indicate the survey questions and results of the survey that was included in the education material mailed out to all Council premises paying a waste management charge (including rural properties) in May 2016.

 

Access to an infirmed household service

 

Currently there are 50 registered infirmed services where the waste collection contractor wheels out their bin to be serviced, and returns their bin after emptying. It has been identified that these elderly residents are less likely than other residents to be able to physically transport their bulky goods to the waste management facility.

 

There is an option for infirmed residents to forgo one voucher per annum to receive a restricted collection service. This process would involve a 2-3 cubic metre skip bag being delivered to the property several weeks prior to a designated collection date once a year. 

 

To be eligible for this service, residents would need to be:

 

1    Located on the domestic kerbside waste collection route;

2    Registered with Council to receive an infirmed kerbside collection service;

3    Only present items that can fit inside the skip bag provided; and

4    Present the bag for collection at their front boundary where a truck can easily access for collection.

 

These residents would contact the Coffs Coast Waste Service Hotline to request and book a service and obtain the appropriate service information such as conditions of use and date of designated collection.

 

Cost – Council’s contractor (Handybin Waste Services) have advised that they can provide this service at a cost based on a per site service for the trial bulky goods collection period during the current contract extension period.  The following advice has been received from Handybin on the pricing of such a service.

 

“Assuming that we can source the correct size & type of bags for no more than $40 each (which I hope is likely), we can give an indicative charge (ex. GST) of $100 per site. So even if all 50-odd infirm services used this system, the total cost would not exceed $5,000 pa.

 

This would be based on the main assumption that we discussed previously, being that the collection service would be provided to all infirm services on the same day/week (probably late in the year), and that all bags would be delivered by us 2-4 weeks prior to the assigned collection time.

 

If you need a firmer quote, please let me know and I will follow up actual quotes for bags. From experience it might take a couple of weeks for suppliers to respond though.”

 

There are obvious issues with the option being how infirm residents would be able to load a 3 cubic metre bag with bulky items and secondly the cost, which at $100 per site seems expensive.

 

Access to a box caged trailer for eligible residents

 

It is proposed to provide one or more 3 cubic metre caged box trailers at no charge to eligible residents, and available for booking between either 9am and 12pm or 1pm and 4pm to assist them in transporting their bulky waste items to the landfill. To book the trailer, the resident will phone the Coffs Coast Waste Services (CCWS) Hotline and provide their details. A booking will be lodged online by the call centre staff.  The details will then be accessible by Council’s Waste Management Facility staff who will direct residents to the trailer at the facility upon presentation of a valid NSW Drivers Licence and contact details.

 

To be eligible for this service, residents will need to:

 

1    Reside in a property located within the Shire boundaries that qualify for the issuing of a bulky goods voucher;

2    Contact the CCWS Hotline to reserve a booking of the trailer;

3    Hold a valid NSW drivers licence;

4    Have a vehicle to tow the trailer which is registered and has a tow bar fitted;

5    Be prepared to pick the trailer up at the Nambucca Waste Facility;

6    Only use the trailer for its intended use and duration; and

 

Cost – The Contractor (Handybin Waste Services) has agreed to provide a 6 x 4 box trailer at no charge to Council. All related costs including insurance, maintenance and repairs will be provided by contractor (Handybin Waste Services) for the trial of the vouchers for the bulky goods collection period during the current contract extension period.

 

Other Transport Options

 

Transport options available to all other residents during the trial period without a suitable vehicle are as follows:

 

1    Passing landfill disposal vouchers onto a friend/neighbour/family member for assistance and transport to the Waste Facility;

2    Hire/borrow a trailer of family and friends to transport material to the Waste Facility;

3    Passing landfill disposal vouchers onto a contractor for transport (skip bin operators or local rubbish removers charges may apply);

4    Smaller bulky good items could possibly fit into the boot or back seat of a standard sedan or station wagon (depending on the size of the vehicle).

 

 

CONSULTATION:

 

Handybin Waste Services

Community feedback

 

Comment from General Manager

 

It is understood that there is a level of dissatisfaction amongst urban residents who received the twice yearly kerb side bulky goods collection with the current trial of a voucher system.  Council has now been advised that the tender for a new collection service has been advertised with the tender closing on 15 December.  The tender will include a range of options for bulky goods collection for the ensuing 10 year contract including a continuation of the previous twice yearly bulky goods kerb side collection (with all its faults), a once yearly bulky goods kerb side collection; an on-call service; a voucher system (as trialled); and combinations of these.

 

The Council is scheduled to decide on the 10 year waste collection contract and the type of bulky goods service it wants at the Council meeting on 30 March 2017.  The new contract would then become operational in March 2018.

 

There are issues in changing the existing trial arrangement as it will only be in place for approximately 18 months before a possible further change via the new contract.  To inform residents of another change and then to possibly change again in 18 months will cause significant confusion.  The other problem is that Council is in a fairly weak negotiating position in relation to negotiating with its contractor.  This is evidenced by the pricing of the option of a bulky goods collection service for infirm residents.

 

In the circumstances it is recommended that the trial be allowed to run to the commencement of the new contract in March 2018.  Balanced against the expressed dissatisfaction of many residents is the fact that they will be saving approximately $110,000 per annum plus upwards of $20,000 in costs attributed to illegal dumping associated with the bulky goods kerbside service.

 

 

SUSTAINABILITY ASSESSMENT

 

Environment:

 

All bulky goods waste materials are presented at the Waste Management Facility for source separation and / or landfilling in a controlled manner at a licenced waste disposal facility.

 

The cessation of a bulky goods collection or voucher system could result in illegal dumping across the Shire.

 

Social:

 

Discussions within the industry providers for this type of service have indicated that a new tendered price for a scheduled bulky goods collection service may significantly increase. Councils domestic waste management charges are already relatively high compared to other rural and regional Councils Local Ares

 

Economic:

 

There are no significant economic implications.

 

Risk:

 

There is the potential risk for illegal dumping with the reduction in service or potential cessation of a bulky goods collection or voucher system.

 

 

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

 

Direct and indirect impact on current and future budgets:

 

There is approximately $110,000.00 saving for the reduction of the kerb side bulky goods in comparison to offering the voucher system

 

There is a potential minor increase to cover the cost of providing infirmed services 

 

Source of fund and any variance to working funds:

 

Additional income will need to be sourced from the annual domestic waste management charge.

 

Service level changes and resourcing/staff implications:

 

The introduction of the voucher system has resulted in a potential lower level of service for eligible residents and an increased level of service for rural residents who were not eligible to receive a bulky goods collection,

 

There are no identifiable changes or implications to staff resources at this point.

 

Attachments:

1

33352/2016 - Report Attachment - Bulky Goods Voucher Stats and Inactive Report

 

2

33393/2016 - Report Attachment - Nambucca Shire Council Bulky Goods Survey Results

 

  


Ordinary Council Meeting - 13 October 2016

Waste Disposal Vouchers

 


Ordinary Council Meeting - 13 October 2016

Waste Disposal Vouchers